TECH
Tesla launches its Megapack, a new massive 3 MWh energy storage product
TECH

Tesla launches its Megapack, a new massive 3 MWh energy storage product

Published: July 30, 2019  |  5 min read, 914 words
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Tesla is launching today its ‘Megapack’, a massive new energy storage product that combines up to 3 MWh of storage capacity and a 1.5 MW inverter. Electrek exclusively reported last year that Tesla has been working on a new energy storage system called ‘Megapack’. We found out that Tesla was going to use the Megapack at a giant new energy storage project in California. Today, almost a year later, the company is now officially launching the product. Tesla wrote about it in a blog post: “Megapack significantly reduces the complexity of large-scale battery storage and provides an easy... READ MORE
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Fred Lambert
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Credible3
Well Sourced2
Science Misrepresented1

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Credible
July 31, 2019
Credible
While the article must be deemed credible because of the direct sources quoted (the Tesla.com blogpost) it stops at a superficial descriptive outline of the facts without providing the reader with further information. Instead of including in the article the whole blogpost multiple times, the author could have provided the reader with a critical analysis of the social and political implications of the release of the Megapack and a direct link to the blogpost. Even though the article remains at a superficial level, the author provides accurate information and helps circulate the news of Tesla's latest and greatest creation.
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Science Misrepresented
July 31, 2019
Science Misrepresented
As I said in a previous review (iceberg making machine): the best match is not "science misrepresented" but rather "science either profoundly misunderstood or purposefully ignored." The article breezily states: "“Using Megapack, Tesla can deploy an emissions-free 250 MW, 1 GWh power plant in less than three months on a three-acre footprint ... " It may well be (almost) emissions free WHILE IN OPERATION but that does NOT mean that its existence is without ecological consequence ... of the sort it purports to be alleviating. The manufacture of the Megapack required the expenditure of CO2-emitting processes from the mining, processing & transport of raw materials, to the energy used in final manufacture, to the transportation to its final resting spot. The CO2 molecule is long-lived in the atmosphere ... several centuries. Therefore NO beneficial claims about green-technology should be made without inclusion of the critical calculation: "CO2 emissions saved in use minus CO2 emitted to manufacture, deploy, maintain, including ultimate disposal." A company capable of making such a product can certainly do the calculation. It can be considered both a proof of validity of design AND an essential marketing tool. Tesla has claimed its "total global footprint to more than 2 GWh of cumulative storage." Some sort of frame of reference should be given, like current global electricity use and projects for future demand. Also the source of the critical lithium needs be considered.
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Credible
July 31, 2019
Credible
The article reads a bit like a press release, with the majority of the word count coming directly from Tesla's released statements about the new Megapack product. With that said, this is also information that would only be available from the source (Tesla) itself, so I won't hold it against author Fred Lambert or Electrek.co too much. I'm glad someone is covering this story in a time when so many are looking for excuses to criticize Tesla rather than embrace the incredible progress they've given us so far.
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Credible
July 30, 2019
Credible
This article has me on the fence. It was a bit jargony at first - I had to search some of the acronyms - but then it helped give context to what these more efficient, denser batteries mean for use. But then it lacked in context for the impact that these Megapack's would have... only talked about a deal with PG&E with no real details. Overall credible but lacking.
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Well Sourced
July 31, 2019
Well Sourced
Interesting and links to the original blog post announcement. I wish there was a little more on what's new about this other than that it's bigger.
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Well Sourced
July 31, 2019
Well Sourced
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