Navy Ditches Touchscreens For Knobs And Dials After Fatal Crash
U.S.
August 12, 20193 min read, 515 words

Navy Ditches Touchscreens For Knobs And Dials After Fatal CrashNavy Ditches Touchscreens For Knobs And Dials After Fatal Crash

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Published: August 12, 2019  |  3 min read, 515 words
A collision at sea that claimed the lives of 10 sailors has led to the Navy deciding to replace an unpopular touchscreen interface in some ships with more traditional mechanical controls. “Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” a Navy official said of the outgoing technol...
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Scores for this article.

Percentage of critic and public trust in this article.
Balanced2
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N/A
critic score
critic reviews: 1
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75%
public score
public reviews: 4

CRITIC REVIEWS

Credible
August 12, 2019
The reader will find this a brief but interesting read. The author oversimplifies the pertinent issues a bit, but that is to be expected when attempting to condense a complex issue into layman's terms. A worthwhile read particularly for those interested in broadening the scope of their understanding with regard to the referenced incident.
August 12, 2019
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PUBLIC REVIEWS

Balanced
August 12, 2019
The article is somewhat surface level, but for a technology focused news outlet, it does well to remain balanced and provide quotes that are somewhat anti-technology.
August 12, 2019
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Balanced
August 13, 2019
The article does a good job of presenting a problem outside the usual scope of the news site (usually purely tech-related) to its audience. It manages to provide a surface level explanation of the technological-related problem, referencing the full in-detail article of the incident and the discussion sparked from it, and steer away from biased comments. Quick and interesting read that will provide the user with an insight on how UX/UI problems can affect the navigation of a military ship.
August 13, 2019
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Credible
August 12, 2019
While I believe another reviewer, Patricia B., has this right, I do believe the information gathered and presented is credible overall. The article sites the real reason for switching away from touchscreens but the headline is a bit sensationalized in its wording - simply because of the timeline of events.
August 12, 2019
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Begging the Question
August 12, 2019
This article places the blame for a 2017 collision between a USN vessel and an oil tanker on new electronic touch screens used for navigation. However, it also states the persons navigating this vessel did not have sufficient training to know how the electronic system worked. Further, where was the Captain and senior staff during this emergency? Electronic touch screens will be replaced by throttles "because its what the crew wants". Fine. But without sufficient training the vessel is still at risk no matter what system is used to maneuver it. The real question left after reading this article is whether or not this crew has received the training necessary to properly steer this vessel in open seas and in port? 10 sailors died and 54 people were injured due to lack of training. Lastly, why was a picture of a black woman sailor chosen for the lead picture of the article? Do black women comprise the majority of sailors in the USN? If this were a story of heroism in steering a ship away from a collision in high seas would a black female sailor still be in the lead photo?
August 12, 2019
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