Why We Can’t Have the Male Pill
SCIENCE · CULTURE
August 3, 201718 min read3684 words
Published: August 3, 2017  |  18 min read3684 words
The trouble began, as it so often does, with a bottle of Chivas Regal. Back in the 1950s, scientists at Sterling Drug, a now-defunct pharmaceutical company, synthesized a class of chemicals that made male rats temporarily infertile. They thought they might be onto something big:...
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Credible12
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N/A
critic score
critic reviews: 0
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92%
public score
public reviews: 12
img-trusted
94%
critic score
32 reviews
img-trusted
62%
public score
106 reviews
img-contested
N/A
critic score
0 reviews
img-trusted
92%
public score
12 reviews

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PUBLIC REVIEWS

Credible
August 5, 2017
A very in depth presentation of past and present attempts at male contraceptives and the limitations faced in the scientific community. Well written and sums up all of the factors at play in getting a male "pill." A bit lengthy but thorough.
August 5, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
Very well written and comprehensive article on the challenges facing male-contraception. Seems that a lack of funds is the greatest inhibitor to accomplishing an effective form of male-contraception, which begs the question as to what pharmaceutical companies deem valuable investments. I'm surprised by the german study of 9,000 men of which 55 percent of the respondents would take male contraception if given the choice.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
Overall, this article was fairly well written. Some portions of the article dropped in quality and began referring to inferred information and mentioned unsubstantiated claims; however, when unverified information was presented, that was expressed by the author. Otherwise, the rest of the article was written in a manner that was engaging, personally relevant, and at times captivating. One trend that really caught my attention was the natural transition that the article progressed through, starting with scientific and technical information supplemented with historical context before leading into advantageous business opportunities and potential regulatory implications. The transition was relatively smooth and the organization of the article in this manner helped walk the reader through a logical development of the issue at hand. On a similar note, the first portion of the article that more frequently utilized technical and scientific information was burdensome when it relied too much on the reader's assumed expertise and existing knowledge. This is not unique to any one academic field. Academic, scientific, and technical professionals are accustomed to regularly speaking with other professionals within their respective specialties in a very specific language utilized primarily by that field. This requires the reader to posses a certain level of knowledge or expertise in order to understand much of the language being used, which has a high potential for isolating the reader by preaching about the issue rather than educating or informing about it. One last thing: the accessibility of the references included in the article was somewhat disturbing. Many of the underlined portions of the article that had hyperlinks attached for the respective reference it was drawing the information from was exclusive by nature. In order to follow up on these "exclusive" citations, one would need to be a Bloomberg Professional Service subscriber. This immediately preselects those who are able to verify the credibility of the article, and subsequently those who cannot. Though there were some specific concerns regarding the quality of communication and accessibility of references, the article should be trusted as a credible source that explains the current status of the ever-emerging market of male contraception.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 5, 2017
Both thorough explanation and humanity are articulated in this article. The sources are both appropriate humanizing with little pop science thrown in. No unrealistic projections are made and the process that any procedure or pharmaceutical would have to go through to gain FDA approval is explained well. Neither emotional nor cold, the question is addressed and answered in an informative and succinct way.
August 5, 2017
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Credible
August 4, 2017
The author does a great job introducing a massively under-discussed topic introducing history, technical issues and social point of view providing references. The humour that runs throughout helps the reader remain focused and entertained on an article that is longer than the average length.
August 4, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
Fantasticly thorough and interesting article, the author did a wonderful job in gathering research and putting it all together.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
The author, Emily Anthes, provides history, context, research, objections, and the future of male contraceptives in one succinct article. The article is engaging enough for its length and is an interesting topic whether you're male or female.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
It's interesting that the male contraceptive option has to be "squeaky clean" before it is approved. Women face many side affects with the pill, but that didn't stop it's approval. Looks like the male pill is quite a ways off. Too bad...it's a great idea to make men a part of the contraception process as well.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
This article does a fantastic job of introducing the history of male birth control research, its struggles, and the teams working to try to overcome them. The author does a great job of using mild humor to keep the reader engaged in what is a somewhat longer-from article. This is a very under-discussed topic and one I'd never really thought about until now. Overall it's a very eye-opening and informative piece.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 5, 2017
Fascinating article with great explanations for every issue there currently is with male birth-control.
August 5, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
A very well researched and well written, interesting article. The author gives us a ton of history and information on the topic, and uses a lot of direct quotes. I've often wondered why there wasn't any type of male contraceptive similar to the pill, and now I feel like I fully understand why. I also thought it was interesting how, like Lee B. said, the male contraceptive option has to be nearly perfect with no side effects, but many females deal with several side effects while using the pill.
August 3, 2017
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Credible
August 3, 2017
Excellent article. I wish the test-men wouldn't be such pansies..
August 3, 2017
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