Horizon Zero Dawn, Joss Whedon and the Problem with "Strong Female Characters"
CULTURE
July 26, 20196 min read, 1178 words

Horizon Zero Dawn, Joss Whedon and the Problem with "Strong Female Characters"Horizon Zero Dawn, Joss Whedon and the Problem with "Strong Female Characters"

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Published: July 26, 2019  |  6 min read, 1178 words
Over the past weekend it emerged that Joss Whedon, the legendary creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, might be a bit of a scumbag. Whedon, who in the past decade has built something of a reputation as a leading male feminist in pop culture, was recently divorced from his wife of ...
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Anecdotal Evidence
August 25, 2017
Much of this piece stems from the anecdotal evidence of author Holly Green who has apparently come into contact with misogyny in the workplace. There is no evidence provided throughout this piece to support her claims. I would have liked to have seen a breakdown of women vs. male lead characters in video games. Then I would have liked to see the percentage breakdown of sexually appealing male vs. female characters out of that data set. I have a feeling most female lead characters are sexually attractive, while I'm sure male characters have more range(ex. scar-faced and rag wearing warrior). I too had issue with the sentence "in the end, we’re strong, because we’re trying to survive you [men]". This is a problem I see with modern day feminism which insists that men/patriarchy are purposefully keeping women down. I believe the more complicated and nuanced reality is rooted in evolutionary psychology. For example: Women and children off the burning bus first. When there's a draft, it's men that are called upon. When women demand equality in the workplace, you never hear them demanding more jobs as ditch-diggers, trash collectors, coal miners, or any of the other dangerous jobs that society needs in order to function. Feminism began as a female led movement against the horrors of unregulated capitalism, and I hope the movement can regain their focus because they'll find a lot of support from men. The current belief that men are the oppressors and women are the oppressed is an overly simplistic explanation and assumes that men are bad-intentioned. In reality, it's a complicated issue that stems back to our earliest roles in human survival. It's one that we should work to correct together, and that won't happen if feminism assigns all men as the problem.
August 25, 2017
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Anecdotal Evidence
August 24, 2017
I applaud the author, Holly Green, for writing about a new, logical approach to presenting women, whether in video games or not, rather by agency then strength. I also appreciated the fervor in which she wrote this article. Yet, the way in which she arrived at her conclusion I did not. Much of the article is anecdotal evidence based on her own gatherings, ripe with speculation, generalization, opinion and gender bias ("in the end, we’re strong, because we’re trying to survive you [men]"). I wish, instead of focusing on a negative bias, opted for further context on how we, as a society, as a man, and even as other women, we can help depict the agency of a woman - not just in the last paragraph.
August 24, 2017
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Pure Opinion
August 24, 2017
A very interesting thought piece about the connection between creators of strong female characters and misogyny. It is not so much reporting on a story as describing and discussing a current issue and phenomenon.
August 24, 2017
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Credible
August 24, 2017
Very interesting article that explains why creating strong female character is not enough to fight misogyny. Very nice parallel between one of the best female characters in modern videogames, and how women are usually portrayed.
August 24, 2017
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