WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears confused at extradition hearing
WORLD · POLITICS · MEDIA
October 21, 20193 min read, 539 words

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears confused at extradition hearingWikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears confused at extradition hearing

 in 
Published: October 21, 2019  |  3 min read, 539 words
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appeared confused at a London court hearing on Monday, struggling to recall his name and age in his first public appearance in months as he sought to fight his extradition to the United States. Assange, 48, who spent seven years holed up in Ecuad...
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears confused at extradition hearing Read more

Scores for this article.

Percentage of critic and public trust in this article.
Balanced3
img-contested
N/A
critic score
critic reviews: 2
img-trusted
67%
public score
public reviews: 6

CRITIC REVIEWS

Surface Level
October 23, 2019
Reuters reports that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange "appeared in good health" but was also mumbling and stuttering, like he could not remember his name and date of birth. The way it is reported it's as if Assange has a verbal tic and maybe this is another aspect of his eccentric personality. There is no context. So, here's some that would be useful to readers. On May 9, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture Nils Melzer visited the Belmarsh prison, where Assange is confined. Two medical experts, who specialize in examining potential victims of torture and abuse, accompanied Melzer and conducted a medical assessment. “Mr. Assange showed all symptoms typical for prolonged exposure to psychological torture, including extreme stress, chronic anxiety, and intense psychological trauma,” one expert concluded. The expert added, “[He] has been deliberately exposed, for a period of several years, to progressively severe forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, the cumulative effects of which can only be described as psychological torture.” What is tacked on at the bottom of the report is pablum to satisfy two audiences—the people who may think Reuters was too sympathetic to Assange and the people who may think Reuters was too hostile to Assange. "Admirers have hailed..." but "his detractors..." It demonstrates the surface level understanding defined by conventional wisdom that permeates this reporting on an administrative hearing in a critical case. In fact, at no point in the report do the words "Espionage Act" appear. Reuters never bothers to call attention to the significance of prosecuting a journalist under this 1917 law.
October 23, 2019
Is this helpful?
Balanced
October 22, 2019
A just-the-facts look at the ongoing and long-running referenced matter. The writer belies no bias and merely lays out the current state of affairs. Mildly speculative as to the mental state of the individual in question but that can be forgiven. Contextually relevant in the broader scope of this tale and nicely compact in detailing such. Prospective readers, even those who have not followed this story from the beginning, will find themselves brought up to speed and generally well-informed after having read it.
October 22, 2019
Is this helpful?

PUBLIC REVIEWS

Lack of Reliable Sources
October 22, 2019
Maybe Assange's mental health is a story. Maybe not! A writer says Assange mumbled. It would be VERY surprising if a man who'd “holed up” the last 7 years was NOT disoriented and unsure of what was happening, what he should do, what to think about. I took the inference that the writer wanted us to believe something was clinically wrong, despite presenting no evidence. Maybe I misread the article, but it seems a reasonable read, one that the author made no effort to dispel.
October 22, 2019
Is this helpful?
Surface Level
October 22, 2019
What's worrisome is that Assange apparently is having "a hard time to think" and seeming incoherent, but no explanation was given as to why. Add to this sham of a case the question of 'why is he being jailed anyway?' The case against him is a classic CIA frame, with so many holes in it that it's a botch before it's started. That said, I have always had a hard time understanding the USA's extradition claims on him -- he's not a USA citizen, he's an international journalist, and he was leaked info that he published (with redactions based on journalist & govt responses) which transformed USA's understanding that the secret military and NSA really are violating most of the laws they supposedly enforce.
October 22, 2019
Is this helpful?
Great Context
October 22, 2019
This shows you a glimpse at the big picture as to what this story was about. It is not a full summary, far from it, but it does inform someone enough to give them an idea of what is going on.
October 22, 2019
Is this helpful?
Balanced
October 22, 2019
The article is balanced and gives you a good overview of what is happening to this man. The story is much deeper as we know, but surely it's a good way to keep up to date with how the story is evolving.
October 22, 2019
Is this helpful?
Balanced
October 22, 2019
This user only left a rating
October 22, 2019
Is this helpful?
Anecdotal Evidence
October 21, 2019
This is a pretty balanced serving of context for readers who haven't been following this enormous story. I will say that the author talking about Assange appearing confused means nothing to me and serves only as anecdotal evidence. I was however pleasantly surprised to see the writers of this article provide the proper defenses of Assange when stating what he's been accused of. With all that said, there wasn't much new information in the piece, so if you're familiar with the story, you can avoid this read.
October 21, 2019
Is this helpful?