Trump cries fake news as image of dramatic orange tan line goes viral
U.S. · POLITICS · MEDIA
February 9, 20202 min read, 318 words

Trump cries fake news as image of dramatic orange tan line goes viralTrump cries fake news as image of dramatic orange tan line goes viral

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Published: February 9, 2020  |  2 min read, 318 words
An image of a windswept Donald Trump, which appears to show a dramatic forehead tan line through his blown-back blond hair, has gone viral – prompting the hashtag #orangeface to trend on Twitter. This image was posted late Friday afternoon to an unverified Twitter account called...
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Credible2
img-contested
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critic reviews: 0
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67%
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public reviews: 3

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Credible
February 9, 2020
The article itself is surface level and playful, not declaring the authenticity of the photo in question. Although some might see this article as an excuse to take a cheap shot at Trump, this photo did indeed go viral and it could be argued that it warrants a story. The author definitely adds some salt to the wound at the end of the article when she includes a couple of the most clever jabs at Trump regarding the photo, which I admittedly found funny.
February 9, 2020
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Failing Occam's Razor
February 10, 2020
The article says the photo was “adjusted” with (non-Photoshop) software so it's technically correct it wasn't photoshopped. But no journalism standard supports altering a photo's appearance to exaggerate ANY aspect of it, or to change the context by cropping. Without seeing the unadjusted photo, it's impossible to tell how ridiculous the fake tan looked to people who were there. Certainly, the Guardian would not have published the photo alongside its news coverage of the day, without confirming that the photo was legit. This story is a half-truth, unverifiable in the meaning most people will take from it.
February 10, 2020
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Credible
February 9, 2020
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February 9, 2020
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