Adam Serwer
Adam Serwer
Adam Serwer is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers politics.Source
Texas, United States
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RECENT ARTICLES
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Julián Castro: ‘This Is the Time to Make Change’

Julián Castro: ‘This Is the Time to Make Change’

Julián Castro was ahead of the curve. The former San Antonio mayor and secretary of housing and urban development failed to get traction in the 2020 Democratic primary, but his campaign was focused on the issues of racial and economic justice that are now at the center of the national debate over discrimination in America, .When I , he was already proposing the creation of a federal database for police misconduct, the imposition of rules compelling cops to report impropriety by fellow officers, and the curtailment of qualified immunity, the legal doctrine that makes it nearly impossible for...

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Adam Serwer
Jun 26
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It Didn’t Have to Be Like This

It Didn’t Have to Be Like This

W took office in 2017, he pointed to “mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation,” and vowed to end this “American carnage.” From now on, he said, “every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American families.” And he made a promise: “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”More than three years later, tens of millions of the Americans Trump promised not to forget are out of work, many of...

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Adam Serwer
Jun 16
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Trump Gave Police Permission to Be Brutal

Trump Gave Police Permission to Be Brutal

When the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin dug his knee into the back of George Floyd’s neck for nine minutes while Floyd pleaded for help, he was merely following the president’s advice.“Please don’t be too nice,” Donald Trump of police officers on Long Island in 2017, in a speech largely focused on the MS-13 gang. The audience laughed. “When you see these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon, you just see them thrown in, rough. I said, ‘Please don’t be too nice.’”Floyd’s killing has sparked nationwide protests, despite the fact that the coronavirus outbreak, which has...

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Adam Serwer
Jun 3
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Bad Apples in Buffalo

Bad Apples in Buffalo

After an elderly protester in Buffalo, New York, was pushed to the ground by police officers and left to lie there as blood pooled beneath his head, the head of the local police union, John Evans, said his colleagues were disgusted.Disgusted, that is, that two of the officers seen in the video were suspended without pay.“Fifty-seven resigned in disgust because of the treatment of two of their members, who were simply executing orders,” Evans , offering a classic Nuremberg defense. The officers ; they have simply resigned from the riot team that was deployed to clear the city’s Niagara...

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Adam Serwer
Jun 5
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The Fight Over the 1619 Project Is Not About the Facts

The Fight Over the 1619 Project Is Not About the Facts

A dispute between a small group of scholars and the authors of The New York Times Magazine’s issue on slavery represents a fundamental disagreement over the trajectory of American society. When the new york times magazine published its 1619 Project in August, people lined up on the street in New York City to get copies. Since then, the project—a historical analysis of how slavery shaped American political, social, and economic institutions—has spawned a podcast, a high-school curriculum, and an upcoming book. For Nikole Hannah-Jones, the reporter who conceived of the project, the response...

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Adam Serwer
Dec 28
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The Trump Infallibility Doctrine

The Trump Infallibility Doctrine

William Barr was outraged about the special-counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. The claim that President Donald Trump could have obstructed justice by conducting official acts, such as firing the FBI director, was “fatally conceived,” he wrote in a June 2018 memo, and could do “lasting damage to the presidency and the administration of law in the executive branch.” Still, Barr conceded, it was theoretically possible for the president to obstruct justice. “Thus, for example, if a President knowingly destroys or alters evidence, suborns perjury, or induces...

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Adam Serwer
Nov 17
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Why Republicans Aren't Turning on Trump

Why Republicans Aren't Turning on Trump

The Democrats grew a spine. The detention camps weren’t enough. The policy of deliberate child torture was insufficient. The neglect of Americans displaced by natural disasters didn’t pass muster. The hush money shelled out to the president’s former mistresses in violation of federal law was too small a crime. The president using his office to enrich himself wasn’t sufficient. Deflecting blame from a foreign government’s effort to elect the president while seeking financial gain from that government, and then attempting to obstruct the investigation, was deemed too complicated to pursue. ...

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Adam Serwer
Oct 7
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What Americans Do Now Will Define Us Forever

What Americans Do Now Will Define Us Forever

The conservative intelligentsia flocked to the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., this week for the National Conservatism Conference, an opportunity for people who may never have punched a time clock to declare their eternal enmity toward elites and to attempt to offer contemporary conservative nationalism the intellectual framework that has so far proved elusive. Yoram Hazony, the Israeli scholar who organized the conference, explicitly rejected white nationalism, barring several well-known adherents from attending, my colleague Emma Green reported. But despite Hazony’s efforts, the...

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Adam Serwer
Jul 22
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A Crime by Any Name

A Crime by Any Name

The horrors detailed in the press were hard to believe. Detainees described that “it was difficult to move in any direction without jostling and being jostled.” The water provided them was foul, “of a dark color, and an ordinary glass would collect a thick sediment.” The “authorities never removed any filth.” A detainee wrote that the “only shelter from the sun and rain and night dews, was what we could make by stretching over us our coats or scraps of blanket.” As for the food, “Our ration was in quality a starving one, it being either too foul to be touched or too raw to be digested.”Such...

theatlantic.com
Adam Serwer
Jul 3
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