Andy Greenberg
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Meet Darkside, Russia's dark web drug lord

Meet Darkside, Russia's dark web drug lord

TRIAL OFFERPrint + Digital Only £1Loading...0/0Welcome to WIRED UK. This site uses cookies to improve your experience and deliver personalised advertising. You can at any time or find out more by reading our .Among the handful of black markets that have survived law enforcement's , the drug selling site RAMP is different: First, it's written in the Russian language, and caters to only Russian clientele. Second, it's the ; It's outlived both the Silk Road and Silk Road 2. And third, there's the unusual figure behind it: A chatty, no-nonsense drug lord who goes by the name of...

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Andy Greenberg
Dec 5
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Facebook Messenger Adds Safety Alerts—Even in Encrypted Chats

Facebook Messenger Adds Safety Alerts—Even in Encrypted Chats

year, governments around the world have pressured Facebook to abandon its plans for , arguing that the feature . Today Facebook is rolling out new abuse-detection and alert tools in Messenger that may help address that criticism—without weakening its protections.Facebook today announced new features for Messenger that will alert you when messages appear to come from financial scammers or potential child abusers, displaying warnings in the Messenger app that provide tips and suggest you block the offenders. The feature, which Facebook started rolling out on Android in March and is now...

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Andy Greenberg
5d ago
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Web Giants Scrambled to Head Off a Dangerous DDoS Technique

Web Giants Scrambled to Head Off a Dangerous DDoS Technique

a botnet of called Mirai , one of the companies that provides the global directory for the web known as the Domain Name System or DNS. The attack took down Amazon, Reddit, Spotify, and Slack temporarily for users along the East Coast of the US. Now one group of researchers says that a vulnerability in DNS could allow a similar scale of attack, but requiring far fewer hacked computers. For months, the companies responsible for the internet's phone book have been rushing to fix it.Today researchers from Tel Aviv University and the Interdisciplinary Center of Herzliya in Israel released new...

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Andy Greenberg
May 19
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The Confessions of the Hacker Who Saved the Internet

The Confessions of the Hacker Who Saved the Internet

am on a quiet Wednesday in August 2017, Marcus Hutchins walked out the front door of the Airbnb mansion in Las Vegas where he had been partying for the past week and a half. A gangly, 6'4", 23-year-old hacker with an explosion of blond-brown curls, Hutchins had emerged to retrieve his order of a Big Mac and fries from an Uber Eats deliveryman. But as he stood barefoot on the mansion's driveway wearing only a T-shirt and jeans, Hutchins noticed a black SUV parked on the street—one that looked very much like an FBI stakeout. He stared at the vehicle blankly, his mind still hazed from sleep...

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Andy Greenberg
May 12
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Thunderbolt Flaws Expose Millions of PCs to Hands-On Hacking

Thunderbolt Flaws Expose Millions of PCs to Hands-On Hacking

warned for years that any laptop left alone with a hacker for more than a few minutes should be considered compromised. Now one Dutch researcher has demonstrated how that sort of physical access hacking can be pulled off in an ultra-common component: The found in millions of PCs.On Sunday, Eindhoven University of Technology researcher Björn Ruytenberg . On Thunderbolt-enabled Windows or Linux PCs manufactured before 2019, his technique can bypass the login screen of a sleeping or locked computer—and even its hard disk encryption—to gain full access to the computer's data. And while his...

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Andy Greenberg
May 10
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The Untold Story of NotPetya, the Most Devastating Cyberattack in History

The Untold Story of NotPetya, the Most Devastating Cyberattack in History

perfect sunny summer afternoon in Copenhagen when the world’s largest shipping conglomerate began to lose its mind. The headquarters of A.P. Møller-Maersk sits beside the breezy, cobblestoned esplanade of Copenhagen’s harbor. A ship’s mast carrying the Danish flag is planted by the building’s northeastern corner, and six stories of blue-tinted windows look out over the water, facing a dock where the Danish royal family parks its yacht. In the building’s basement, employees can browse a corporate gift shop, stocked with Maersk-branded bags and ties, and even a rare model of the company’s...

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Andy Greenberg
Aug 22
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India's Covid-19 Contact Tracing App Could Leak Patient Locations

India's Covid-19 Contact Tracing App Could Leak Patient Locations

the world rush to that can help , privacy advocates have cautioned that those systems could, if implemented badly, result in a dangerous mix of . India's new contact tracing app may serve as a lesson in those privacy pitfalls: Security researchers say it could reveal the location of Covid-19 patients not only to government authorities but to any hacker clever enough to exploit its flaws.Independent security researcher Baptiste Robert today sounding that warning about India’s Health Bridge app, or Aarogya Setu, created by the government’s National Informatics Centre. Robert found that one...

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Andy Greenberg
May 6
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Google and Apple Reveal How Covid-19 Alert Apps Might Look

Google and Apple Reveal How Covid-19 Alert Apps Might Look

you've been exposed to a serious disease through a push notification may still seem like something out of dystopian science fiction. But the ingredients for that exact scenario will be baked into Google and Apple's operating system in as soon as a matter of days. Now the two companies have shown not only , but how it could look—and how it'll let you know if you're at risk.On Monday, Apple and Google released a few new details about the Bluetooth system they're building into both Android and iOS that will let health care authorities track potential encounters with Covid-19. The companies...

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Andy Greenberg
May 4
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How Spies Snuck Malware Into the Google Play Store—Again and Again

How Spies Snuck Malware Into the Google Play Store—Again and Again

for Android apps has never had a reputation for the strictest protections from malware. and even banking trojans have managed over the years to . Now security researchers have found what appears to be a more rare form of Android abuse: state-sponsored spies who repeatedly slipped their targeted hacking tools into the Play Store and onto victims' phones.At a remote virtual version of its annual Security Analyst Summit, researchers from the Russian security firm Kaspersky today plan to present research about a hacking campaign they call PhantomLance, in which spies hid malware in the Play...

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Andy Greenberg
Apr 28
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Amid Its Covid-19 Crisis, China Was Still Hacking Uighurs’ iPhones

Amid Its Covid-19 Crisis, China Was Still Hacking Uighurs’ iPhones

been one of the first countries to lock down over the first months of 2020, as began its global spread. But that didn't stop suspected Chinese spies from carrying out a new smartphone-hacking campaign aimed at one of their favorite targets: the country's Uighur ethnic minority.From as early as December of last year and continuing through March, Chinese hackers used so-called "watering hole" attacks to plant malware on the iPhones of Uighurs, according to new findings from the security firm Volexity. To do so, a hacker group that Volexity calls Evil Eye compromised popular Uighur websites,...

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Andy Greenberg
Apr 22
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Is Apple and Google's Covid-19 Contact Tracing a Privacy Risk?

Is Apple and Google's Covid-19 Contact Tracing a Privacy Risk?

Apple that the two companies are building changes into Android and iOS to enable Bluetooth-based Covid-19 contact tracing, they touched off an immediate firestorm of criticisms. The notion of a Silicon Valley scheme to monitor yet another metric of our lives raised immediate questions about the system's practicality and its privacy. Now it's time to seek answers.Apple and Google say that starting next month they'll add new features to their mobile operating systems that make it possible for certain approved apps, run by government health agencies, to use Bluetooth radios to track physical...

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Andy Greenberg
Apr 17
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How Apple and Google Are Enabling Covid-19 Bluetooth Contact-Tracing

How Apple and Google Are Enabling Covid-19 Bluetooth Contact-Tracing

its spread across the world, to track infections via smartphones. Now, Google and Apple are teaming up to give contact-tracers the ingredients to make that system possible—while in theory still preserving the privacy of those who use it.On Friday, the two companies announced a rare joint project to create the groundwork for Bluetooth-based contact-tracing apps that can work across both iOS and Android phones. In mid-May, they plan to release an application programming interface that apps from public health organizations can tap into. The API will let those apps use a phone's Bluetooth...

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Andy Greenberg
Apr 10
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High-Stakes Security Setups Are Making Remote Work Impossible

High-Stakes Security Setups Are Making Remote Work Impossible

It's a rule of thumb in cybersecurity that the more sensitive your system, the less you want it to touch the internet. But as the US hunkers down to limit the spread of Covid-19, cybersecurity measures present a difficult technical challenge to working remotely for employees at critical infrastructure, intelligence agencies, and anywhere else with high-security networks. In some cases, working from home isn't an option at all.Companies with especially sensitive data or operations often limit remote connections, segment networks to limit a hacker's access if they do get in, and sometimes...

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Andy Greenberg
Mar 13
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Hackers Can Clone Millions of Toyota, Hyundai, and Kia Keys

Hackers Can Clone Millions of Toyota, Hyundai, and Kia Keys

Over the past few years, owners of cars with keyless start systems have learned to worry about so-called relay attacks, in which hackers exploit radio-enabled keys to . Now it turns out that many millions of other cars that use chip-enabled mechanical keys are also vulnerable to high-tech theft. A few cryptographic flaws combined with a little old-fashioned hot-wiring—or even a well-placed screwdriver—lets hackers clone those keys and drive away in seconds.Researchers from KU Leuven in Belgium and the University of Birmingham in the UK earlier this week new vulnerabilities they found in the...

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Andy Greenberg
Mar 7
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Dangerzone Lets You Open Email Attachments Safely

Dangerzone Lets You Open Email Attachments Safely

Opening email attachments from untrusted senders has long been one of the to get hacked. But unlike other common security screwups—using "password" for your password, downloading pirated software from shady websites—there's no practical way for a modern human to avoid opening the occasional mystery-meat attachment.Now one technologist has produced a solution. Micah Lee, the head of information security for First Look Media, plans to release an alpha version of a free tool called Dangerzone on GitHub a week from Sunday, timed to a talk about it at the Nullcon conference in Goa, India....

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Andy Greenberg
Mar 2
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The US Blames Russia's GRU for Sweeping Cyberattacks in Georgia

The US Blames Russia's GRU for Sweeping Cyberattacks in Georgia

For more than a decade, Russian hackers have tormented the country's neighbors, and even . As long as Russia has kept those relentless, disruptive cyberattacks within its own region, the West has mostly turned a blind eye. But as the US seeks to head off any digital meddling in its own upcoming election, the State Department is trying something different: Calling out Russia for a broad-scale act of digital sabotage that hit the country of Georgia last fall.State Department officials today issued a blaming the Russian military intelligence agency known as the GRU for cyberattacks that hit...

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Andy Greenberg
Feb 22
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Signal Is Finally Bringing Its Secure Messaging to the Masses

Signal Is Finally Bringing Its Secure Messaging to the Masses

Last month, the cryptographer and coder known as Moxie Marlinspike was getting settled on an airplane when his seatmate, a Midwestern-looking man in his sixties, asked for help. He couldn't figure out how to enable airplane mode on his aging Android phone. But when Marlinspike saw the screen, he wondered for a moment if he was being trolled: Among just a handful of apps installed on the phone was Signal.Marlinspike launched Signal, widely considered the world's most secure end-to-end encrypted messaging app, , and today heads the nonprofit Signal Foundation that maintains it. But the man on...

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Andy Greenberg
Feb 14
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Conservative News Sites Track You Lots More Than Left-Leaning Ones

Conservative News Sites Track You Lots More Than Left-Leaning Ones

In an age of hyper-partisanship, Americans increasingly get their news from sites that align with their political beliefs. But more separates those right- and left-leaning sides of the web than their opposite ideologies. According to a new study, the right end of the fractured online news industry also tracks its audience far more aggressively than the left does.In a study published last week, researchers from King's College London, the privacy-focused browser firm Brave, and the research arm of Spanish telecom firm Telefonica compared the surveillance practices of left- and right-leaning...

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Andy Greenberg
Feb 11
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Twitter Still Can't Keep Up With Its Flood of Junk Accounts, Study Finds

Twitter Still Can't Keep Up With Its Flood of Junk Accounts, Study Finds

learned of on social media and , Twitter has scrambled to polluting its platform. But when it comes to the larger problem of automated accounts on Twitter designed to spread spam and scams, inflate follower counts, and game trending topics, a new study finds that the company still isn’t keeping up with the deluge of garbage and abuse.In fact, the paper's two researchers write that with a machine-learning approach they developed themselves, they can identify abusive accounts in far greater volumes and faster than Twitter does—often flagging the accounts months before Twitter spotted and...

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Andy Greenberg
Feb 11
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