Ben Turner
Ben Turner
Ben Turner is a U.K. based staff writer at Live Science. He covers physics and astronomy, among other topics like weird animals and climate change. He graduated from University College London with a degree in particle physics before training as a journalist. When he's not writing, Ben enjoys reading literature, playing the guitar and embarrassing himself with chess.Source
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Lab-made hexagonal diamonds are stronger than the real thing

Lab-made hexagonal diamonds are stronger than the real thing

Diamonds may be the strongest known natural material, but researchers have just created some stiff competition. By firing a dime-sized graphite disk at a wall at 15,000 mph (24,100 km/h), scientists momentarily created a hexagonal diamond that is both stiffer and stronger than the natural, cubic kind. Hexagonal diamonds, also known as Lonsdaleite diamonds, are a special type of diamond with carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal pattern. Formed when graphite is exposed to extreme heat and stress, such as at meteor impact sites, the rare material has long been theorized to be stronger than...

April 2, 2021
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Antarctica's 'Doomsday Glacier' is melting faster than expected

Antarctica's 'Doomsday Glacier' is melting faster than expected

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.A robotic submarine has returned from the dark underbelly of one of largest glaciers with chilling news — it could be melting faster than we previously thought.Thwaites Glacier, a gigantic ice shelf in West Antarctica, has been on climate scientists' radars for two decades now. But they didn't know just how fast the glacier was melting, and how close it was to complete collapse, until researchers sent an unmanned submarine below the ice shelf. The first measurements...

April 14, 2021
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Astronomers detect a bright-blue bridge of stars, and it’s about to blow

Astronomers detect a bright-blue bridge of stars, and it’s about to blow

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Astrophysicists have found a new region of the Milky Way, and it's filled with searingly hot, bright-blue stars that are about to explode.The researchers were creating the most detailed map yet of the star-flecked spiral arms of our galactic neighborhood with the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia telescope when they discovered the region, which they have named the Cepheus spur, they reported in a new study.Nestled between the Orion Arm — where our is— and the...

April 9, 2021
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Antimatter cooled to near absolute zero by laser beam

Antimatter cooled to near absolute zero by laser beam

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Researchers have cooled antimatter to near absolute zero for the first time — by capturing it in a magnetic trap and blasting it with concentrated laser light.The method enabled scientists in Canada working at CERN's Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus (ALPHA) experiment to cool antimatter to temperatures just one-twentieth of a degree above absolute zero, making it over 3,000 times colder than the coldest recorded temperature in the Antarctic.In theory, this...

April 1, 2021
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Sperm whales outwitted 19th-century whalers by sharing evasive tactics

Sperm whales outwitted 19th-century whalers by sharing evasive tactics

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Catching a during the 19th century was much harder than even Moby Dick showed it to be. That's because sperm whales weren't just capable of learning the best ways to evade the whalers' ships, they could quickly share this information with other whales, too, according to a study of whale-hunting records. By analyzing newly-digitized logbooks kept by whalers during their hunting voyages in the North Pacific, the researchers found that the strike rates of the hunters upon...

March 19, 2021
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Physicists measure the tiniest gravitational force ever

Physicists measure the tiniest gravitational force ever

TrendingLive Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Physicists have measured the smallest gravitational field ever recorded, in an experiment that could help in the search for a unified theory of physics.Of the four fundamental forces known to physics — the weak and strong interactions, the electromagnetic force and the gravitational force — only gravity remains unintegrated into the playbook of physics called the Standard Model, which describes how the zoo of subatomic particles behaves. Gravity is instead...

March 11, 2021
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