Beth Ellwood
Beth Ellwood
Hi, I’m Beth! I’m a freelance writer specializing in research writing.Source
Montréal, Québec
CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
2 reviews

RECENT ARTICLES

Sort by:
No Rating
Regular exercise offers stronger mental health benefits than cardiorespiratory fitness, study finds

Regular exercise offers stronger mental health benefits than cardiorespiratory fitness, study finds

A Swedish study published in has shed light on the well-known link between exercise and mental health. The researchers found that, when accounting for sedentary behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness does not appear to improve anxiety and depressive symptoms, while frequency of exercise does.The link between exercise and mental health has been well-documented, and yet findings are limited when it comes to the type of physical activity that is most beneficial. The literature has yet to establish the relative importance of the frequency, intensity, and duration of exercise.  As study authors...

Jan 19
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Coronavirus news can contribute to symptoms of psychosis

Coronavirus news can contribute to symptoms of psychosis

A recent UK study has found that pandemic-related news can exacerbate symptoms of paranoia and hallucinations among those with increased fear of COVID-19 and among those with low political trust. The findings were published in the journal While there has been great discussion about the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, study authors Barbara Lopes and colleagues say there is a lack of data concerning how the pandemic may be affecting symptoms of psychosis — and particularly, symptoms of paranoia and hallucinations.Paranoia refers to the irrational belief that one is being...

Jan 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Brain imaging study reveals blunted empathic response to others’ pain when following orders

Brain imaging study reveals blunted empathic response to others’ pain when following orders

A brain imaging study has found that inflicting pain on another person in compliance with an order is accompanied by reduced activation in parts of the brain associated with the perception of others’ pain. The study was published in .There exists a well-documented psychological phenomenon where people will go to great lengths to comply with authority even if it means harming others. The most famous example is the Milgram experiment, where subjects pressed a button to deliver what they believed were increasingly painful electric shocks to strangers at the request of experimenters. While this...

Jan 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Conservatives are more sensitive to the violation of social norms than leftists, study finds

Conservatives are more sensitive to the violation of social norms than leftists, study finds

New research published in has found evidence that a person’s sensitivity to social rule-breaking is linked to their political orientation.Social norms are underlying rules that guide our social behavior. These guidelines dictate what is and is not appropriate in a given situation, and people who breach them are met with negative evaluations. While social norms are widely enforced and followed, there are individual differences in sensitivity to these rules.Study authors Élise Désilets and colleagues wanted to explore one particular factor that may be associated with a person’s response to...

Jan 8
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Study suggests a cognitive bias toward social threat contributes to the maintenance of social anxiety in children

Study suggests a cognitive bias toward social threat contributes to the maintenance of social anxiety in children

New research published in offers evidence that the maintenance of social anxiety in children is not unlike that in adults. The study found that children with social anxiety disorder displayed a cognitive bias characterized by heightened negative automatic thoughts concerning social threats.Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is marked by an unrelenting fear of being judged by other people, which hinders a person’s social experiences. Most studies exploring the features of SAD have used adult samples, and much less is known about how the disorder is maintained in children. Study authors Barbara...

Jan 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Vaccine-hesitant parents have lower trust in physicians and a greater sensitivity to disgust than their counterparts

Vaccine-hesitant parents have lower trust in physicians and a greater sensitivity to disgust than their counterparts

New research published in has uncovered several demographic and personality characteristics that can predict parents’ hesitancy toward vaccines. Distrust of physicians, heightened sensitivity to disgust, and greater religiosity were among the predictors of parents’ resistance to vaccinating their children.Undeterred by the vast scientific evidence in favor of the safety and effectiveness of vaccines, a growing number of people are voicing their distrust of vaccinations. Vaccine hesitancy has distressing consequences, as evidenced by the increased incidences of vaccine-preventable diseases...

Jan 6
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Individuals with depression show a lack of positive bias when it comes to autobiographical memory

Individuals with depression show a lack of positive bias when it comes to autobiographical memory

A study published in suggests that autobiographical memory serves a self-enhancement purpose, whereby events that reinforce positive self-images are remembered with more detail and perceived as more central to one’s personal story. The researchers further found that this self-enhancement function is lacking in individuals with depressive symptoms.Autobiographical memory (ABM) consists of knowledge and experiences from a person’s history that are integrated into their self-concept. These memories can be retrieved with varying degrees of detail and are then used to guide our behavior.Study...

Jan 4
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Nature-based therapy can boost immune system function among older adults, study finds

Nature-based therapy can boost immune system function among older adults, study finds

A new study suggests that contact with nature can alleviate the aging immune system. Older adults who partook in six-months of horticultural therapy showed reduced T-cell exhaustion and inflammation. The findings were published inAs the immune system ages and declines, older adults are left with a greater risk of infection, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. While there are existing medical interventions that target age-related changes in the immune system, these procedures are costly and difficult to carry out over a wide population.Study authors Glenn Choon Lim Wong and team describe a...

Jan 1
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Being primed to feel older propels people to contribute to the greater good, study finds

Being primed to feel older propels people to contribute to the greater good, study finds

A study published in the uncovered a novel way to motivate people toward prosocial action. A series of studies found that increasing people’s subjective age motivates them to contribute more to the greater good of others.While charitable organizations often depend on donations from the public to continue their operations, garnering such support can be tricky. This is likely because people tend to be more inclined to help those who are close to them, rather than people they do not know. Study authors Jen H. Park and colleagues wanted to explore one factor that may lead people to be more...

Dec 31
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
People who base their self-worth on their financial success tend to have less satisfying romantic relationships

People who base their self-worth on their financial success tend to have less satisfying romantic relationships

According to new research, people who base their self-worth on how much money they have report more financial conflict within their romantic relationships, and in turn, lower relationship satisfaction. The study, published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, further found that the effect held regardless of a person’s financial status or level of economic stress. Money problems are one of the most common sources of strain within romantic relationships. While studies have revealed that couples experiencing financial hardship are more likely to fight over money issues, it is...

Aug 4
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
OUTLETS
psypost.org

psypost.org

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-trusted
91%