Brian P. Dunleavy
Brian P. Dunleavy
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Study suggests COVID-19 may have remained in Wuhan past April

Study suggests COVID-19 may have remained in Wuhan past April

A neighborhood wet market in Wuhan was identified as the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the virus may have lingered longer in the city than previously thought, according to a new study. File Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI |The outbreak in Wuhan, China may have lasted into May, according to an analysis published Thursday by .If accurate, the findings are significant given that Chinese officials declared the city free of the virus and lifted lockdown restrictions there in April."We conclude that ... a large amount of asymptomatic carriers of [the new coronavirus] existed after...

Jan 7
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Study: Parents born early nearly twice as likely to have children with autism

Study: Parents born early nearly twice as likely to have children with autism

Parents born prematurely or with low birth weight are nearly twice as likely to have children with autism spectrum disorder, a new study has found. File Photo by nickelbabe/Parents who were born very prematurely are nearly twice as likely to have children with autism spectrum disorder, according to a study published Thursday by the .Women and men who were born at less than 37 weeks or with low birth weight were more likely to have children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than those born at full term and healthy weight, the data showed.The findings suggest that autism spectrum...

Jan 7
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Fatigue, breathing, mental health problems may persist for months after COVID-19

Fatigue, breathing, mental health problems may persist for months after COVID-19

COVID-19 symptoms can persist for months, even if patients don't experience serious illness initially, two new studies have found. File Photo by Debbie Hill/UPI |More than 75% of people diagnosed with have at least one symptom of the disease six months after they were infected with the virus, a study published Friday by found.Fatigue and muscle weakness were the most common persistent symptoms, affecting more than 60% of study participants, the data showed.In addition, about one in four participants reported sleep difficulties or symptoms of anxiety or depression months after they were...

Jan 8
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COVID-19 hospitalization rates for children rise in U.S., study finds

COVID-19 hospitalization rates for children rise in U.S., study finds

Children are being hospitalized with COVID-19 at an increasing rate, a new study has found. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI |The hospitalization rate for children across the United States increased by 800% over the course of six months between mid-May and mid-November of last year, according to a study published Monday by .The analysis of data from 22 U.S. states revealed that trends in hospitalization rates for children infected with the new coronavirus nationally typically mirrored those of older adults, the researchers said.However, while children are far less likely to be hospitalized...

Jan 11
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Study: Coffee reduces risk for prostate cancer

Study: Coffee reduces risk for prostate cancer

Coffee consumption may reduce prostate cancer risk, a new analysis has found. File Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI |Drinking several cups of coffee daily appears to lower risk for developing prostate cancer, according to an analysis published Monday by .Each additional daily cup of coffee reduced the drinker's risk for the cancer, the data showed."This study suggests that increased coffee consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer," researchers from Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University wrote."Further research is still warranted to explore the underlying...

Jan 11
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Oral sex frequency, number of partners linked to HPV-related cancer risk in study

Oral sex frequency, number of partners linked to HPV-related cancer risk in study

A new study suggests that frequency, number of partners and age of first time engaging in oral sex are linked to significantly increased risk for HPV-related cancers. Photo by /PixabayHaving more than 10 oral sex over a lifetime partners quadruples a person's risk for human papillomavirus-related mouth and throat cancer, a study published Monday by the journal found.In addition, having oral sex at a younger age, and with more partners, also increases the risk for cancers of the mouth and throat caused by human papillomavirus, or HPV, the data showed."Our research helps patients and...

Jan 11
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U.S. expands COVID-19 vaccine priority to include all seniors 65 and up

U.S. expands COVID-19 vaccine priority to include all seniors 65 and up

Federal officials on Tuesday announced that COVID-19 vaccine availability includes people aged 65 years and older. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI |U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials Tuesday expanded vaccine availability during the initial phase of distribution to include people age 65 years and older.The changes also give priority to those with underlying health conditions that place them at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 infection, officials said.People with conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and respiratory illnesses such as chronic obstructive...

Jan 12
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Many in U.S. nervous about seeking medical care due to COVID-19, survey says

Many in U.S. nervous about seeking medical care due to COVID-19, survey says

Many Americans are delaying medical appointments because of the pandemic, a new survey has confirmed. Photo by John Liston/FlickrNearly 70% of adults in the United States worry about going to medical appointments when rates are high in their area, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Orlando Health Heart and Vascular Institute in Florida.More than half of those surveyed said they are "hesitant" to go to the hospital even for an emergency. In addition, nearly half of respondents indicated they won't reschedule missed in-person medical appointments until COVID-19 concerns are reduced...

Jan 12
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Cancer deaths in U.S. down by nearly one-third in last 20 years, analysis finds

Cancer deaths in U.S. down by nearly one-third in last 20 years, analysis finds

Improved diagnosis and treatment approaches have helped reduce cancer deaths in the United States, according to a new analysis. Photo by klbz/Deaths from cancer in the United States fell 31% between 1991 and 2018, according to an analysis published Tuesday by the .However, the report estimates that this year, nearly 1.9 million people will be diagnosed cancer and more than 600,000 will die from the disease.The estimates are based on currently available data on cancer incidence and mortality from 2018 and do not account for the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the society said."The impact of...

Jan 12
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Researchers close in on 'universal' flu vaccine as COVID-19 fight takes priority

Researchers close in on 'universal' flu vaccine as COVID-19 fight takes priority

Researchers may be one step closer to a universal flu vaccine, even as COVID-19 takes priority. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI |Researchers believe they are one step closer to a "universal" flu vaccine, even as concerns over the seasonal virus move to the back burner during the pandemic.T cells found in the lungs may hold the key to long-lasting immunity against influenza A, the more common and often more severe form of the virus, according to the researchers behind a study published Friday by .These cells, which the researchers call resident helper T cells, help the body initiate...

Jan 8
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