Damian Carrington
Damian Carrington
I'm Environment Editor at the Guardian - DMs openSource
London, England
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Total ban on bee-harming pesticides likely after major new EU analysis

Total ban on bee-harming pesticides likely after major new EU analysis

The world’s most widely used insecticides pose a serious danger to both honeybees and wild bees, according to a major new assessment from the European Union’s scientific risk assessors.The conclusion, based on analysis of more than 1,500 studies, makes it highly likely that the neonicotinoid pesticides will be banned from all fields across the EU when nations vote on the issue next month.The (Efsa), published on Wednesday, found that the risk to bees varied depending on the crop and exposure route, but that “for all the outdoor uses, there was at least one aspect of the assessment...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
March 1, 2018
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Climate crisis has shifted the Earth’s axis, study shows

Climate crisis has shifted the Earth’s axis, study shows

Massive melting of glaciers has tilted the planet’s rotation, showing the impact of human activities Environment editorFri 23 Apr 2021 04.00 EDTLast modified on Fri 23 Apr 2021 07.52 EDTThe massive melting of glaciers as a result of global heating has caused marked shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s, research has shown. It demonstrates the profound impact humans are having on the planet, scientists said.The planet’s geographic north and south poles are the point where its axis of rotation intersects the surface, but they are not fixed. Changes in how the Earth’s mass is...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
Apr 23
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Toxic impact of pesticides on bees has doubled, study shows

Toxic impact of pesticides on bees has doubled, study shows

Analysis contradicts claims that the environmental impact of pesticides is falling, say scientists Environment editorThu 1 Apr 2021 14.00 EDTThe toxic impact of pesticides on bees and other pollinators has doubled in a decade, new research shows, despite a fall in the amount of pesticide used.Modern pesticides have much lower toxicity to people, wild mammals and birds and are applied in lower amounts, but they are even more toxic to invertebrates. The study shows the higher toxicity outweighs the lower volumes, leading to a more deadly overall impact on pollinators and waterborne insects...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
Apr 1
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Just 3% of world’s ecosystems remain intact, study suggests

Just 3% of world’s ecosystems remain intact, study suggests

Pristine areas in the Amazon and Siberia may expand with animal reintroductions, scientists say Environment editorThu 15 Apr 2021 00.00 EDTLast modified on Thu 15 Apr 2021 00.09 EDTJust 3% of the world’s land remains ecologically intact with healthy populations of all its original animals and undisturbed habitat, a study suggests.These fragments of wilderness undamaged by human activities are mainly in parts of the Amazon and Congo tropical forests, east Siberian and northern Canadian forests and tundra, and the Sahara. Invasive alien species including cats, foxes, rabbits, goats and camels...

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Damian Carrington
Apr 15
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'Dimming the sun': $100m geoengineering research programme proposed

'Dimming the sun': $100m geoengineering research programme proposed

All options to fight climate crisis must be explored, says national academy, but critics fear side-effects Environment editorThu 25 Mar 2021 11.00 EDTLast modified on Tue 6 Apr 2021 12.17 EDTThe US should establish a multimillion-dollar research programme on solar geoengineering, according to the country’s national science academy.In it recommends funding of $100m (£73m) to $200m over five years to better understand the feasibility of interventions to dim the sun, the risk of harmful unintended consequences and how such technology could be governed in an ethical way.The National Academies...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
Mar 25
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Elite minority of frequent flyers 'cause most of aviation's climate damage'

Elite minority of frequent flyers 'cause most of aviation's climate damage'

AdvertisementAn “elite minority” of frequent flyers cause most of the climate damage resulting from aviation’s emissions, according to an environmental charity.The from the countries with the highest aviation emissions, shows a worldwide pattern of a small group taking a large proportion of flights, while many people do not fly at all.In the US, 12% of people took 66% of all flights, while in France 2% of people took half of the flights, the report says. In China 5% of households took 40% of flights and in India just 1% of households took 45% of all the flights.It was already known that in...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
Mar 31
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Whitest-ever paint could help cool heating Earth, study shows

Whitest-ever paint could help cool heating Earth, study shows

New paint reflects 98% of sunlight as well as radiating infrared heat into space, reducing need for air conditioning Environment editorThu 15 Apr 2021 14.00 EDTLast modified on Thu 15 Apr 2021 14.14 EDTThe whitest-ever paint has been produced by academic researchers, with the aim of boosting the cooling of buildings and tackling the climate crisis.The new paint reflects 98% of sunlight as well as radiating infrared heat through the atmosphere into space. In tests, it cooled surfaces by 4.5C below the ambient temperature, even in strong sunlight. The researchers said the paint could be on...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
Apr 15
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Average westerner's eating habits lead to loss of four trees every year

Average westerner's eating habits lead to loss of four trees every year

Research links consumption of foods such as coffee and chocolate to global deforestation Environment editorMon 29 Mar 2021 11.00 EDTLast modified on Tue 30 Mar 2021 00.08 EDTThe average western consumer of coffee, chocolate, beef, palm oil and other commodities is responsible for the felling of four trees every year, many in wildlife-rich tropical forests, research has calculated.Destruction of forests is a major cause of both the climate crisis and plunging wildlife populations, as natural ecosystems are razed for farming. The study is the first to fully link high-resolution maps of global...

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Damian Carrington
Mar 29
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Plastic particles pass from mothers into foetuses, rat study shows

Plastic particles pass from mothers into foetuses, rat study shows

Nanoparticles found in foetal brains and hearts, but impact on human health is as yet unknown Environment editorThu 18 Mar 2021 10.00 EDTLast modified on Thu 18 Mar 2021 11.59 EDTTiny plastic particles in the lungs of pregnant rats pass rapidly into the hearts, brains and other organs of their foetuses, research shows. It is the first study in a live mammal to show that the placenta does not block such particles.The experiments also showed that the rat foetuses exposed to the particles put on significantly less weight towards the end of gestation. The research follows the revelation in...

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Damian Carrington
Mar 18
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Arctic sea ice thinning twice as fast as thought, study finds

Arctic sea ice thinning twice as fast as thought, study finds

Sea ice across much of the Arctic is thinning twice as fast as previously thought, researchers have found. Arctic ice is melting as the climate crisis drives up temperatures, resulting in a vicious circle in which more dark water is exposed to the sun’s heat, leading to even more heating of the planet. The faster ice loss means the shorter north-eastern shipping passage from China to Europe will become easier to navigate, but it also means new oil and gas extraction is more feasible. Calculating the thickness of sea ice from satellite radar data is difficult because the amount of snow...

theguardian.com
Damian Carrington
Jun 4
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