CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews

RECENT ARTICLES

Sort by:
No Rating
More fissures are opening up at the Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland

More fissures are opening up at the Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland

×ByPhotographer Brian EmfingerTHIS extraordinary aerial shot of an ongoing volcanic eruption near the city of Reykjavik in Iceland encapsulates the beauty and destructive power.Photojournalist Brian Emfinger used a drone to capture the image of bubbling hot lava flowing out of the Fagradalsfjall . It first erupted on 19 March and has since attracted numerous awe-struck spectators. This fissure in the volcano – the fourth to appear during this series of eruptions – began to ooze lava in the early hours of 9 April, resulting in the scorching blanket of molten rock seen in this...

Apr 25
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Unexpected beauty of cancer research revealed in competition shortlist

Unexpected beauty of cancer research revealed in competition shortlist

×THESE striking images show the intricate and unexpected beauty of cancer research. All were taken by people working at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), London, and the Royal Marsden Hospital, London. They are shortlisted for the ICR’s .Above is Marta Forés Maresma’s image of larval-stage tissue of a fruit fly, an organism used to study cancer and tumours. Fluorescent confocal microscopy was used to detect proteins in cells that glow red or green, a method that can help in studying cell interaction in cancer.AdvertisementAbove is Stella Man’s image of a soft tissue sarcoma tumour...

Mar 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Amazing gecko photos captured using X-rays from a particle accelerator

Amazing gecko photos captured using X-rays from a particle accelerator

×INTRICATELY preserved with its internal make-up laid bare, this composite image of a mummified Schlegel’s Japanese gecko (Gekko japonicus) shows the power of the high-energy X-rays emitted by a special type of particle accelerator.Gary Ruben, Florian Schaff, Marcus Kitchen and Steve Morton at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, captured the image with a , which accelerates electrons to close to the speed of light so that they emit high-energy X-rays. The main difference between a synchrotron’s X-rays and those from a hospital X-ray machine is brilliance: a synchrotron can produce...

Mar 1
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
CRISPR gene-editing urgently needs an off-switch – now we have one

CRISPR gene-editing urgently needs an off-switch – now we have one

×THERE is a technology that could tackle some of life’s most pressing problems, from disease to malnutrition. It could fix medical conditions such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anaemia simply by changing a bit of genetic code. It could eliminate malaria by making male mosquitoes infertile. It could wipe out pests that destroy crops. And it could modify other organisms to increase their usefulness, helping to create foods that are tastier and more nutritious.This is the promise of CRISPR, a biochemical tool at the forefront of a gene-editing revolution. Produced naturally by bacteria,...

Jan 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Weird caterpillar uses its old heads to make an elaborate hat

Weird caterpillar uses its old heads to make an elaborate hat

×PhotographerAlan HendersonTHIS caterpillar sports a unique headpiece: each ball is one of its old moulted heads, precariously stacked on top of each other.AdvertisementAs the caterpillar of the moth Uraba lugens grows, it sheds its exoskeleton – but rather than getting rid of the previous head section, it stays attached to its body to create a bizarre “hat”.This has earned it the nickname the mad hatterpillar, after the Mad Hatter in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. Found in Australia and New Zealand, U. lugens is also known as the gum-leaf skeletoniser, thanks to the...

July 13, 2020
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
There is so much we don't yet know about fungi

There is so much we don't yet know about fungi

×Bodley HeadYOU may never look at fungi in the same way. This enigmatic community of organisms pulls the strings of life, yet we don’t know the half of what fungi get up to. Thankfully, Entangled Life: How fungi make our worlds, change our minds & shape our futures, by mycologist and author Merlin Sheldrake, is an eye-opening exploration of this .Nothing illustrates this better than when he . Mycelia – complex, branched networks of fungal …Existing subscribers, please with your email address to link your account access.Paid annually by Credit CardInclusive of applicable taxes...

June 6, 2020
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
  • Total 6 items
  • 1
OUTLETS
newscientist.com

newscientist.com

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A