Jon Brodkin
Jon Brodkin
Senior IT Reporter for @ArsTechnica. Intergalactic ALF of mystery. "Probably Comcast's least favorite journalist" - The Daily Beast.Source
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Pentagon explains odd transfer of 175 million IP addresses to obscure company

Pentagon explains odd transfer of 175 million IP addresses to obscure company

The US Department of Defense puzzled Internet experts by apparently transferring control of tens of millions of dormant IP addresses to an obscure Florida company just before President Donald Trump left the White House, but the Pentagon has finally offered a partial explanation for why it happened. The Defense Department says it still owns the addresses but that it is using a third-party company in a "pilot" project to conduct security research."Minutes before Trump left office, millions of the Pentagon's dormant IP addresses sprang to life" was the title of a on Saturday. Literally three...

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Jon Brodkin
Apr 26
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Venmo’s new crypto service lets you buy and sell bitcoin, ether, and litecoin

Venmo’s new crypto service lets you buy and sell bitcoin, ether, and litecoin

The PayPal-owned Venmo service will let users buy, sell, and hold bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies within the Venmo app, the company . "Customers will have the ability to buy and sell cryptocurrency using funds from their balance with Venmo, or a linked bank account or debit card," the announcement said.Users will be able to buy or sell bitcoin, ether, litecoin, and bitcoin cash. The feature is rolling out to some users today and "will be available for all customers directly in the Venmo app within the next few weeks."When it becomes available, users can get started "by clicking on...

arstechnica.com
Jon Brodkin
Apr 20
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AT&T/Verizon workers’ union urges states to regulate ISPs as utilities

AT&T/Verizon workers’ union urges states to regulate ISPs as utilities

The Communications Workers of America (CWA) union is lobbying state governments to regulate Internet service providers as utilities.The CWA, which represents workers at AT&T and at Verizon, on Monday a "multi-state effort to pass state legislation that would establish public utility commission oversight of broadband in public safety, network resiliency and consumer protection.""Legislation has already been introduced in California, Colorado and New York, and CWA is in active conversations with policymakers in state houses across the country about its model bill, the Broadband Resiliency,...

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Jon Brodkin
Apr 14
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ISP imposes data cap, explains it to users with condescending pizza analogy

ISP imposes data cap, explains it to users with condescending pizza analogy

Cable company WideOpenWest (which markets itself as WOW!) yesterday told customers that it is imposing a data cap and explained the change with a pizza analogy that would seem more appropriate for a kindergarten classroom than for an email informing Internet users of new, artificial limits on their data usage.The email said WOW is "introducing a monthly data usage plan for your Internet service on June 1, 2021" and described the system as follows:What's a monthly data usage plan? Let us illustrate …Imagine that the WOW! network is a pizza. Piping hot. Toppings galore. Every WOW! customer...

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Jon Brodkin
Apr 2
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Supreme Court’s pro-Facebook ruling could unleash “flood” of robocalls

Supreme Court’s pro-Facebook ruling could unleash “flood” of robocalls

A today in favor of Facebook limits the reach of a 1991 US law that bans certain kinds of robocalls and texts. The court found that the anti-robocall law only applies to systems that have the ability to generate random or sequential phone numbers. Systems that lack that capability are thus not considered autodialers under the law, even if they can store numbers and send calls and texts automatically.Advocates say the ruling will make it harder to block automated calls and texts, potentially unleashing a "flood" of new robocalls.The ruling "nullifies one of the most important protections...

arstechnica.com
Jon Brodkin
Apr 1
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ISP imposes data cap, explains it to users with condescending pizza analogy

ISP imposes data cap, explains it to users with condescending pizza analogy

Cable company WideOpenWest (which markets itself as WOW!) yesterday told customers that it is imposing a data cap and explained the change with a pizza analogy that would seem more appropriate for a kindergarten classroom than for an email informing Internet users of new, artificial limits on their data usage.The email said WOW is "introducing a monthly data usage plan for your Internet service on June 1, 2021" and described the system as follows:What's a monthly data usage plan? Let us illustrate …Imagine that the WOW! network is a pizza. Piping hot. Toppings galore. Every WOW! customer...

arstechnica.com
Jon Brodkin
Apr 2
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Cable lobby says it hates Biden plan to expand broadband and lower prices

Cable lobby says it hates Biden plan to expand broadband and lower prices

President Biden's is, predictably, facing bitter opposition from cable companies that want to maintain the status quo.NCTA–The Internet & Television Association, which represents Comcast, Charter, Cox, and other cable companies, argued that Biden's plan is "a serious wrong turn." NCTA is particularly mad that Biden wants to expand municipal broadband networks that could fill gaps where there's no high-speed broadband from private ISPs and lower prices by providing competition to cable companies that usually ."The White House has elected to go big on broadband infrastructure, but it risks...

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Jon Brodkin
Apr 1
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Biden broadband plan will be hated by big ISPs, welcomed by Internet users

Biden broadband plan will be hated by big ISPs, welcomed by Internet users

President Biden's plan to connect all Americans with high-speed broadband includes proposals to boost competition, build more publicly owned networks, lower prices, and prioritize "future-proof" networks instead of ones that would quickly become outdated. In other words, the plan includes some of the broadband industry's least-favorite ideas and is sure to meet fierce resistance from cable and telecom lobby groups and Republicans.Biden's $100 billion broadband proposal is part of the American Jobs Plan described by the White House in a . The broadband details released so far are a bit...

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Jon Brodkin
Mar 31
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AT&T lobbies against nationwide fiber, says 10Mbps uploads are good enough

AT&T lobbies against nationwide fiber, says 10Mbps uploads are good enough

AT&T is lobbying against proposals to subsidize fiber-to-the-home deployment across the US, arguing that rural people don't need fiber and should be satisfied with Internet service that provides only 10Mbps upload speeds.AT&T Executive VP Joan Marsh detailed the company's stance Friday in a titled "Defining Broadband For the 21st Century." AT&T's preferred definition of 21st-century broadband could be met with wireless technology or AT&T's , a that brings but uses copper telephone wires for the final connections into each home."[T]here would be significant additional cost to deploy fiber to...

arstechnica.com
Jon Brodkin
Mar 29
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Charter charges more money for slower Internet on streets with no competition

Charter charges more money for slower Internet on streets with no competition

It's no surprise that cable companies charge lower prices for broadband when they face competition from fiber-to-the-home services. But an provides a good example of how dramatically promotional prices for Charter's Spectrum Internet service can vary from one street to the next.In this example, Charter charges $20 more per month for slower speeds on the street where it faces no serious competition. When customers in two areas purchase the same speeds, the customer on the street without competition could have to pay $40 more per month and would have their promotional rates expire after only...

arstechnica.com
Jon Brodkin
May 27
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