Katherine Ellison
Katherine Ellison
CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews

RECENT ARTICLES

Sort by:
No Rating
Diane Rehm tackles ‘death with dignity’ again, this time in a new documentary

Diane Rehm tackles ‘death with dignity’ again, this time in a new documentary

John Rehm’s death changed Diane Rehm’s life.Ten years after John was diagnosed with , he couldn’t stand, walk, eat or go to the toilet by himself. Outraged because the his doctor to help hasten his death, he resolved to stop eating and drinking.Diane, the celebrated NPR talk show host and John’s wife of 54 years, kept vigil for the next 10 days. Just after 2 a.m. on June 23, 2014 — a few hours before John died — she took out her iPad and typed the first sentences of a for medical aid in dying.“In most of America, lawmakers and the church are deciding this issue for other people,” she says....

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Apr 2
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
A new treatment may halt cluster headaches. But some say psychedelic drugs are the real answer.

A new treatment may halt cluster headaches. But some say psychedelic drugs are the real answer.

ADImagine a hot poker inside your brain, pressing hard on the back of your eye.That’s how Bob Wold describes a “cluster headache”: a rare and poorly understood disorder he has suffered for the past 40 years.The hour-long attacks — four or more a day — occur in “clusters” that drag on for up to three months. Wold has seen neurologists, chiropractors and acupuncturists, tried more than 70 drugs, had teeth removed and root canals, and considered brain surgery.Nothing helped for the first 20 years, until the day the strait-laced, middle-aged construction contractor tried psilocybin — the active...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Apr 2
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Sleep-deprived kids have gotten a break with remote learning’s later start times. Some hope it’s a wake-up call for schools.

Sleep-deprived kids have gotten a break with remote learning’s later start times. Some hope it’s a wake-up call for schools.

ADSleep-deprived adolescents — forced for generations to wake for school before the chimes of their circadian clocks — have had an unexpected break amid the anxiety and losses of the pandemic. Remote learning has allowed many of them to stay in bed an extra hour or more, providing a “natural experiment” that sleep experts hope will inform the long and stubborn debate over school starting times.So far, many results are anecdotal. Some kids are sleeping longer and more soundly, starting classes ready and refreshed. Others are tossing and turning, beset by anxiety or staying up later staring...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Mar 26
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Perspective | Are women making many of the vaccine appointments for the men in their lives?

Perspective | Are women making many of the vaccine appointments for the men in their lives?

ADFor more than 20 years, I’ve done all of my family’s administrative chores, from scheduling pediatrician visits to paying the bills. I also prepare our taxes — always a gamble when you add my attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder to our accountant’s dyslexia.So I wasn’t surprised when I heard that many women were scheduling vaccination appointments — a singularly boring and that has been compared to waiting in a Soviet-style — for the men in their lives. Men, in most cases, who are perfectly capable of doing it themselves.“It’s so second nature,” said my friend Barbara Graham, a Marin...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Mar 19
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Five things worth knowing about empathy

Five things worth knowing about empathy

ADA tortoise lies on its back, legs waving in distress, until a second tortoise crawls up to turn it over. Millions have watched this , with many leaving heartfelt comments. “Great sense of solidarity,” says one. “There is hope,” says another.The viewers are responding to what many interpret as empathy — a sign that even in the animal world, life isn’t just dog-eat-dog. Alas, they’re probably wrong. As one reptile expert observed, the second tortoise’s motives were likelier more sexual than sympathetic.Consider it a cautionary tale for our times, in which politicians urge us to cultivate...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Jan 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Philanthropies flow funds to climate technologies

Philanthropies flow funds to climate technologies

Four years ago, Shreya Dave left MIT with a doctorate in mechanical engineering and an idea that just might revolutionize the way the world makes chemicals and paper.She and two colleagues had invented a new filtration system that could slash energy costs for a wide swath of businesses, from paper mills to pharmaceuticals. By doing so, it would also fight climate change, potentially saving more than a billion tons of greenhouse gases each year — nearly the total emissions of — if used by up to 15 percent of eligible companies worldwide.Dave’s team launched a start-up in Somerville, Mass.,...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Oct 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Caregivers of elderly loved ones face heavy emotional, physical, financial toll

Caregivers of elderly loved ones face heavy emotional, physical, financial toll

Nearly four years after her longtime partner’s death, Michelle Murphy still wakes in a panic, imagining that she forgot to help him breathe.At 61, Jeffrey Senne was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also called Lou Gehrig’s disease. Murphy had become his main financial support and caregiver in their woodsy Northern California home. She ended up devoting 11 years to looking after him. As the disease progressed, Senne, who Murphy says once looked like Harrison Ford, grew bald and frail, lost control of his bowels and could no longer speak or swallow. To prevent him from...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Sep 27
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Telling the difference between flu and coronavirus is essential for treatment

Telling the difference between flu and coronavirus is essential for treatment

About a week before Pennsylvania shut down last March, at the start of the pandemic, Amanda Bernstein felt short of breath. Then she had a dry cough, followed by a fever.Bernstein, a 29-year-old insurance analyst, asked for a test, but her doctor said he didn’t have one. Instead, he tested her for influenza. When that came back negative, he said she probably had a “bug,” and indeed, she was fine after a few days of Tylenol and cough syrup.“I’ll never know if I had covid,” Bernstein said. “If I’d have known more back then about how serious it was, I’d have been much more worried.”Six months...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Sep 5
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
What to know about being pregnant during the covid-19 pandemic

What to know about being pregnant during the covid-19 pandemic

Wide-awake in the middle of the night, Angela Magno, eight months pregnant and diabetic, found that only one thing could take her mind off the coronavirus pandemic. With a bottle of Pine-Sol and a bucket of hot water, she repeatedly cleaned her home: wiping baseboards and handrails, washing walls and mopping floors. “I was petrified,” said Magno, a school clerk in Bakersfield, Calif., whose daughter Madelyn was born safely on April 7. “What if I got it? What if I gave it to the baby?” As if being pregnant weren’t enough all by itself to make you nervous, covid-19 has raised a brood of...

washingtonpost.com
Katherine Ellison
Apr 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
  • Total 9 items
  • 1
OUTLETS
washingtonpost.com

washingtonpost.com

CRITIC
img-trusted
77%
PUBLIC
img-trusted
68%