Max G. Levy
Max G. Levy
Freelance science journalist. former @AAASMassMedia fellow @WIRED. former editor @massivesci. phd @CUBoulder. probably napping. he/himSource
Los Angeles, CA
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Could Being Cold Actually Be Good for You?

Could Being Cold Actually Be Good for You?

Nobody likes A frozen butt. So when François Haman attempts to recruit subjects to his studies on the health benefits of uncomfortable temperatures, he gets a lot of, well … cold shoulders. And he doesn’t blame them. “You're not going to attract too many people,” says Haman, who studies thermal physiology at the University of Ottawa, Canada. The human body is simply lousy at facing the cold. “I've done studies where people were exposed to 7 degrees Celsius [44.6 Fahrenheit], which is not even extreme. It's not that cold. Few people could sustain it for 24 hours,” he says. (Those subjects...

Jan 3
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Forget Blood—Your Skin Might Know If You’re Sick

Forget Blood—Your Skin Might Know If You’re Sick

biological information flows just beneath the outermost layers of your skin, in which a hodgepodge of proteins squeeze past each other through the interstitial fluid surrounding your cells. This "interstitium" is an expansive and structured space, making it, to some, But its wealth of biomarkers for conditions like tuberculosis, heart attacks, and cancer has attracted growing attention from researchers looking to upend reliance on diagnostic tools they say are inefficient, invasive, and blood-centric."Blood is a tiny fraction of the fluid in our body," says Mark Prausnitz, a chemical...

February 8, 2021
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Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light

Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light

of a University of Pennsylvania engineering building, Mohsen Azadi and his labmates huddled around a set of blinding LEDs set beneath an acrylic vacuum chamber. They stared at the lights, their cameras, and what they hoped would soon be some action from the two tiny plastic plates sitting inside the enclosure. “We didn't know what we were expecting to see,” says Azadi, a mechanical engineering PhD candidate. “But we hoped to see something.”Let’s put it this way: They wanted to see if those plates would levitate, lofted solely by the power of light. Light-induced flow, or photophoresis,...

February 12, 2021
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Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light | WIRED

Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light | WIRED

In the basement of a University of Pennsylvania engineering building, Mohsen Azadi and his labmates huddled around a set of blinding LEDs set beneath an acrylic vacuum chamber. They stared at the lights, their cameras, and what they hoped would soon be some action from the two tiny plastic plates sitting inside the enclosure. “We didn't know what we were expecting to see,” says Azadi, a mechanical engineering PhD candidate. “But we hoped to see something.”Let’s put it this way: They wanted to see if those plates would levitate, lofted solely by the power of light. Light-induced flow, or...

February 12, 2021
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A New Way to Restore Hand Mobility—With an Electrified Patch

A New Way to Restore Hand Mobility—With an Electrified Patch

of overcoming paralysis tends to start with the legs: Superman ; a soap opera character steps out of their wheelchair. “I think society has a tendency to focus solely on the walking aspect of disability,” says Ian Ruder, a magazine editor with the United Spinal Association, a nonprofit advocacy group for people with spinal cord injuries and disorders. But Ruder, who has used a wheelchair following an injury 23 years ago, says even restoring just a fraction of his hand function would improve his quality of life more than walking. “The difference between being able to pinch with my thumb and...

January 29, 2021
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A slime mold changes its mind: an interview with slime mold scientist Audrey Dussutour

A slime mold changes its mind: an interview with slime mold scientist Audrey Dussutour

From the volcanoes of Costa Rica to the deepest reaches of the galaxy, discover the innovative scientific research and incredible personal stories of six #WomenInScience working at the forefront of their fields.Watch Science Friday’s latest film series at . This episode: Slime Minder.Audrey Dussutour is not shy about admitting that her career, and fame, is a bit of an accident. The French specialist in animal behavior didn’t set out to make discoveries about slime minds, or to write a hugely popular book (Le Blob) about the single-celled learners. “It was not my wish to work on slime molds...

October 28, 2020
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