Maya Wei-Haas
Maya Wei-Haas
Science writer @NatGeo | PhD Enviro Chem | Lover of rocks and rxns | Former @SmithsonianMag @AAASMassMedia | Tips: Maya.Wei-Haas@natgeo.comSource
Washington, DC
CRITIC
img-trusted
100%
5 reviews
PUBLIC
img-trusted
100%
13 reviews
RECENT ARTICLES
gold-cheese100%
Weird ‘boomerang’ earthquake detected under the Atlantic Ocean

Weird ‘boomerang’ earthquake detected under the Atlantic Ocean

The temblor shot eastward across a deep gash in the seafloor, and then zipped back to where it started at incredible speeds. It moved so fast it created the geologic version of a sonic boom. A magnitude 7.2 earthquake bolted past Rosario García González’s house in Baja California on a spring afternoon in 2010. González, an elder of the indigenous Cucapah community, later recounted the remarkable sight to scientists: As the quake cracked open the surface, it kicked up a cloud of dust, like a car racing across the shrubby landscape But the car, it seemed, was going the wrong way. ...

nationalgeographic.com
Maya Wei-Haas
Aug 10
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
First active fault zone found on Mars

First active fault zone found on Mars

Millions of miles away, a robot geologist stands alone on the dusty surface of Mars, listening for faint seismic echoes in the ground below. Its finger on the red planet’s pulse is sensitive enough to pick up the whoosh of wind, the drone of dust devils, the creak of tectonic cracks, and many other rumbles ricocheting though the planet’s insides. While most of these signals have been indistinct murmurs, two have stood out loud and clear, allowing scientists to trace them back to their source: the first active fault zone yet found on the red planet. Known as marsquakes, the events clocked...

nationalgeographic.com
Maya Wei-Haas
Dec 28
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Controversial new study pinpoints where all modern humans arose

Controversial new study pinpoints where all modern humans arose

The research reignites a long-simmering debate about how and where our species emerged. A powdery white layer blankets the desiccated landscape of Botswana’s Makgadikgadi pans, one of the world's largest salt flats. But some 200,000 years ago, this blank canvas would have been painted in the blues and greens of a flourishing wetland. Set in the middle of a harsh desert in southern Africa, the lush landscape would have been an appealing place for early humans to call home. Now, a controversial new study in Nature argues that this oasis, known as the Makgadikgadi–Okavango wetland, was not...

nationalgeographic.com
Maya Wei-Haas
Nov 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Strange waves rippled around the world, and nobody knows why

Strange waves rippled around the world, and nobody knows why

On the morning of November 11, just before 9:30 UT, a mysterious rumble rolled around the world. The seismic waves began roughly 15 miles off the shores of Mayotte, a French island sandwiched between Africa and the northern tip of Madagascar. The waves buzzed across Africa, ringing sensors in Zambia, Kenya, and Ethiopia. They traversed vast oceans, humming across Chile, New Zealand, Canada, and even Hawaii nearly 11,000 miles away. These waves didn't just zip by; they rang for more than 20 minutes. And yet, it seems, no human felt them. Only one person noticed the odd signal on the U.S....

nationalgeographic.com
Maya Wei-Haas
Oct 23
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Earth's Inner Core is Doing Something Weird

Earth's Inner Core is Doing Something Weird

On September 27, 1971, a nuclear bomb exploded on Russia’s Novaya Zemlya islands. The powerful blast sent waves rippling so deep inside Earth they ricocheted off the inner core, pinging an array of hundreds of mechanical ears some 4,000 miles away in the Montana wilderness. Three years later, that array picked up a signal when a second bomb exploded at nearly the same spot. This pair of nuclear explosions was part of hundreds of tests detonated during the throes of Cold War fervor. Now, the records of these wiggles are making waves among geologists: They have helped scientists calculate...

nationalgeographic.com
Maya Wei-Haas
Aug 19
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
A tectonic plate is dying under Oregon. Here’s why that matters.

A tectonic plate is dying under Oregon. Here’s why that matters.

Something was nagging at William Hawley, and it was more about what was missing than what was there. As a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley, Hawley is fascinated with the geologic complexities of the Cascadia subduction zone, a giant fault off the coast of the Pacific Northwest. There, the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate plunges under the North American plate, building strain throughout the region and prompting fears of the massive earthquake that could strike when it releases. Hawley, however, was distracted by a peculiar region below central Oregon where it appears...

nationalgeographic.com
Maya Wei-Haas
Jul 29
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
OUTLETS
nationalgeographic.com

nationalgeographic.com

CRITIC
img-trusted
100%
PUBLIC
img-trusted
98%