CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews

RECENT ARTICLES

Sort by:
No Rating
Corals’ hidden genetic diversity corresponds to distinct lifestyles

Corals’ hidden genetic diversity corresponds to distinct lifestyles

Stony corals that build reefs have been hiding their diversity in plain sight. A genetic analysis of the most widespread reef coral in the Indo-Pacific revealed that rather than being a single species (Pachyseris speciosa), it was actually of coral, researchers report April 2 in Current Biology.Coral reefs are the condominiums of ocean biodiversity, supporting more species per square meter than any other marine habitat. Understanding which coral species foster that biodiversity and how those corals behave is vital to taking care of them, especially as a warming climate (SN: 5/6/20). “Just...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 12
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Hints of an ancient coronavirus outbreak appear in modern East Asian DNA

Hints of an ancient coronavirus outbreak appear in modern East Asian DNA

An ancient coronavirus, or a closely related pathogen, triggered an epidemic among ancestors of present-day East Asians roughly 25,000 years ago, a new study indicates.Analysis of DNA from more than 2,000 people shows that accumulated over the next 20,000 years or so, David Enard, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Arizona in Tucson, reported April 8 at the . The finding raises the possibility that some East Asians today have inherited biological adaptations to coronaviruses or closely related viruses.The discovery opens the way to exploring how genes linked to ancient viral...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
How the laws of physics constrain the size of alien raindrops

How the laws of physics constrain the size of alien raindrops

Whether they’re made of methane on Saturn’s moon Titan or iron on the exoplanet WASP 76b, alien raindrops behave similarly across the Milky Way. They are always close to the same size, regardless of the liquid they’re made of or the atmosphere they fall in, according to the first generalized physical model of alien rain.“You can get raindrops out of lots of things,” says planetary scientist Kaitlyn Loftus of Harvard University, who published for what happens to a falling raindrop after it has left a cloud in the April Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets. Previous studies have looked at...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 19
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
50 years ago, scientists claimed marijuana threatened teens’ mental health

50 years ago, scientists claimed marijuana threatened teens’ mental health

The continuing battle over pot — , April 24,1971The White House Conference on Youth voted to legalize the sale of grass (with restrictions). On the same day, the Journal of the American Medical Association published an article condemning the use of marijuana by the young.… The researchers conclude that marijuana smoking is particularly harmful to the adolescent. It adds unnecessary anxieties to the already disturbing problems of physical and psychological maturation.Fifty years after the recommendation to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, at least 15 U.S. states have done so. In...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 20
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Only 3 percent of Earth’s land hasn’t been marred by humans

Only 3 percent of Earth’s land hasn’t been marred by humans

The Serengeti looks largely like it did hundreds of years ago.Lions, hyenas and other top predators still stalk herds of wildebeests over a million strong, preventing them from eating too much vegetation. This diversity of trees and grasses support scores of other species, from vivid green-orange Fischer’s lovebirds to dung beetles. In turn, such species carry seeds or pollen across the plains, enabling plant reproduction. Humans are there too, but in relatively low densities. Overall, it’s a prime example of what biologists call an ecologically intact ecosystem: a bustling tangle of...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
A record-breaking, oxygen-starved galaxy may be full of gigantic stars’ shrapnel

A record-breaking, oxygen-starved galaxy may be full of gigantic stars’ shrapnel

The most oxygen-poor star-forming galaxy ever found hints that the first galaxies to arise after the universe’s birth glittered with supermassive stars that left behind big black holes.Such galaxies are rare now because almost as soon as a galaxy initiates star formation, massive stars produce huge amounts of oxygen, which is the most abundant element in the cosmos after hydrogen and helium. Astronomers prize the few such galaxies found close to home because they offer a glimpse of what conditions were like , before stars had made much oxygen (SN: 8/7/19).The new galaxy’s oxygen-to-hydrogen...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 9
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Europe’s oldest known humans mated with Neandertals surprisingly often

Europe’s oldest known humans mated with Neandertals surprisingly often

When some of the earliest human migrants to Europe encountered Neandertals already living there around 45,000 years ago, hookups flourished.Analyses of DNA found in human fossils from around that time — the oldest known human remains in Europe — suggest that interbreeding between Homo sapiens and Neandertals, who were on the fast track to extinction, occurred more commonly than has often been assumed, two new studies suggest. Both reports appear April 7 in Nature Ecology & Evolution.Genetic evidence in the new reports indicates for the first time that distinct human populations reached...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Newly made laser-cooled antimatter could test foundations of modern physics

Newly made laser-cooled antimatter could test foundations of modern physics

For the first time, physicists have used lasers to deep-freeze antimatter.In a new experiment, an ultraviolet laser quelled the thermal jitters of antihydrogen atoms, . This technique for slowing down antimatter — the oppositely charged counterpart to normal matter — could help scientists build the first antimatter molecules. Taming unruly antimatter with laser light may also allow physicists to measure the properties of antiatoms much more precisely, researchers report in the April 1 Nature. Comparing antiatoms with normal atoms could test some fundamental symmetries of the universe.Lasers...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 5
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
A gene defect may make rabbits do handstands instead of hop

A gene defect may make rabbits do handstands instead of hop

One defective gene might turn some bunnies’ hops into handstands, a new study suggests.To move quickly, a breed of domesticated rabbit called sauteur d’Alfort sends its back legs sky high and walks on its front paws. That strange gait may be the result of , researchers report March 25 in PLOS Genetics.Sauteur d’Alfort rabbits aren’t the only animal to adopt an odd scamper if there’s a mutation to this gene, known as RORB. Mice with a mutation to the gene also do handstands if they start to run, says Stephanie Koch, a neuroscientist at University College London who was not involved with the...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Mar 25
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
No Rating
Fast radio bursts could help solve the mystery of the universe’s expansion

Fast radio bursts could help solve the mystery of the universe’s expansion

Astronomers have been arguing about the rate of the universe’s expansion for nearly a century. A new independent method to measure that rate could help cast the deciding vote.For the first time, astronomers calculated the Hubble constant — the rate at which the universe is expanding — from observations of cosmic flashes called fast radio bursts, or FRBs. While , the technique could mature into a powerful tool for nailing down the elusive Hubble constant, researchers report April 12 at arXiv.org.Ultimately, if the uncertainties in the new method can be reduced, it could help settle the...

sciencenews.org
1719 N Street
+1
Apr 21
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
OUTLETS
sciencenews.org

sciencenews.org

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A