Mitchell Clark
Mitchell Clark
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This browser extension shows what the Internet would look like without Big Tech

This browser extension shows what the Internet would look like without Big Tech

Filed under:A web without Google, Facebook, Microsoft, or AmazonThe Economic Security Project is trying to make a point about big tech monopolies by releasing a browser plugin that will block any sites that reach out to IP addresses owned by Google, Facebook, Microsoft, or Amazon. The extension is called , and after using the internet with it for a day (or, more accurately, trying and failing to use), I’d say it drives home the point that it’s almost impossible to avoid these companies on the modern web, even if you try.Currently, the app has to be side-loaded onto Chrome, and the Economic...

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Mitchell Clark
3d ago
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Google says it’s working to get ‘Hey Google’ working on Wear OS again

Google says it’s working to get ‘Hey Google’ working on Wear OS again

Filed under:It seems like the functionality has been broken for monthsActivating the Google Assistant by saying “Hey Google” has been broken for months, . Google tells The Verge it’s now working on a fix, saying that it’s “aware of the issues some users have been encountering” and will help its partners “address these and improve the overall experience.”There are a good number of users reporting the issue — a post has almost a thousand stars. Reading through the thread, it’s clear that many users with different smartwatch models are all reporting the same issue going back to November 2020....

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Mitchell Clark
2d ago
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Elon Musk says Starlink internet speeds will double to 300 Mbps this year

Elon Musk says Starlink internet speeds will double to 300 Mbps this year

Filed under:He also promises latency improvementsStarlink, SpaceX’s satellite-based internet provider, will double in speed “later this year”, according to , posted as a reply to someone who had just received their (). The company , and Musk specifically calls out a 300 Mbps goal in his tweet.While 300 Mbps isn’t unheard-of speed, it’s faster than many people currently have access to, especially in the low-to-medium population density areas that Musk talks about targeting in .Speed will double to ~300Mb/s & latency will drop to ~20ms later this year— Elon Musk (@elonmusk)Most of Earth by...

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Mitchell Clark
4d ago
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Comcast is yet again delaying its data cap rollout to 12 states, this time until 2022

Comcast is yet again delaying its data cap rollout to 12 states, this time until 2022

Filed under:The caps were supposed to roll out in March, then JulyIf you live in one of the last states where Comcast hasn’t rolled out its data caps, you’re getting another reprieve: that it’s now pushing back the rollout to some time in 2022 (). The 1.2TB data caps, which incur extra charges if users go over them, were but were then . Comcast hasn’t said specifically when next year the rollout would occur.“We are providing them with more time to become familiar with the new plan.”These caps will be familiar if you don’t live in Comcast’s Northeast region, which consists of Connecticut,...

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Mitchell Clark
Feb 19
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After firing a top AI ethicist, Google is changing its diversity and research policies

After firing a top AI ethicist, Google is changing its diversity and research policies

Filed under:The company’s head of AI apologized for his handling of the situationGoogle is changing its policies related to research and diversity after completing an internal investigation into the firing of ethical AI team co-leader , . The company intends to tie the pay of certain executives to diversity and inclusivity goals. It’s also making changes to how sensitive employee exits are managed.Although Google did not reveal the results of the investigation, the changes seem to be direct responses to . After Google demanded that a paper she co-authored be retracted, Gebru told research...

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Zoe Schiffer
Feb 19
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Facebook’s Australian media ban is taking down official government pages

Facebook’s Australian media ban is taking down official government pages

Filed under:Fire agencies and health departments’ posts have disappeared from the platformThe Facebook pages of many Australian government agencies seem to have been caught up in the . Users on Twitter have reported that the pages of agencies like the Bureau of Meteorology, Department of Fire and Emergency Services Western Australia, and Queensland Health have no posts available.When Verge staff in the US tried to access the pages, some saw them as having no posts. Other Verge staffers saw posts appearing as normal, however, though were often viewing pages without logging into Facebook....

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Mitchell Clark
Feb 17
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You shouldn’t have to publicly humiliate AT&T to get usable internet

You shouldn’t have to publicly humiliate AT&T to get usable internet

Filed under:After spending $10,000 to complain, Aaron Epstein is going from 3Mbps to 300Earlier this month, Aaron Epstein spent $10,000 to buy an ad in The Wall Street Journal to tell AT&T’s CEO he wasn’t happy with his internet service — service that was limited to a paltry 3Mbps (. Now, AT&T , and he’s getting over 300 Mbps up and down. All it took was getting interviewed by Ars, , and .In his ad, the North Hollywood, CA resident says he’s been an AT&T customer for 60 years (and backs it up with a @pacbell.net email address), and says he’s disappointed that the company isn’t keeping up...

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Mitchell Clark
Feb 13
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Turns out that Florida water treatment facility left the doors wide open for hackers

Turns out that Florida water treatment facility left the doors wide open for hackers

Filed under:Can you even call this a hack?By now, you’ve probably heard of how hackers managed to infiltrate the computer systems at a water treatment plant in Oldsmar, Florida and remotely control the chemical levels — but it turns out that description gives the hackers far, far too much credit.The reality? The water treatment plant itself left off-the-shelf remote control software on these critical computers — and apparently never, ever bothered to change the password.about the incident from the state of Massachusetts (via ) explains that the SCADA control system was accessed via...

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Sean Hollister
Feb 11
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Someone modded a Game Boy Color to act as a much better Apple TV remote

Someone modded a Game Boy Color to act as a much better Apple TV remote

Filed under:It does two things the Apple TV remote doesn’t: work well and play Mario TennisMost people who have used the Apple TV Siri remote have probably craved something that isn’t — but most of us haven’t modded a Game Boy Color to work as one (). That’s exactly what , and while his project looks sleek as all get-out, it’s surprising how well it works using the Game Boy’s original hardware.First off, we have to talk about the case he used. It was apparently made by a company called , specifically for the project, and it looks incredible with its blend of ‘90s Apple and Nintendo...

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Mitchell Clark
Feb 5
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Comcast is delaying its rollout of 1.2TB data caps that would have hit 12 states in March

Comcast is delaying its rollout of 1.2TB data caps that would have hit 12 states in March

Filed under:They’re still coming, just in July instead of MarchIf you live in one of the twelve states where Comcast is planning to roll out 1.2TB data caps, we have some moderately good news: you won’t have to start monitoring your bill for extra charges until July. The ISP charging customers $10-and-up fees for using more than 1.2TB of data starting this March, but the rollout has been delayed (). This gives us a few more months until the scourge of Comcast home internet data caps are truly nationwide.The areas affected are in Comcast’s Northeast region: Connecticut, Delaware,...

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Mitchell Clark
Feb 3
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Gambling apps are coming to Google’s Play Store in the US and 14 other countries

Gambling apps are coming to Google’s Play Store in the US and 14 other countries

Filed under:They were previously only allowed in fourAn upcoming change to Google’s Play Store policies will allow gambling and betting Android apps that use real money in 15 more countries, including the US, . Currently, gambling apps are only allowed in : Brazil, France, Ireland, and the United Kingdom.The new rules will be applied starting on March 1st, and they’ll permit gambling apps in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. Of course, each country will have its own limitations...

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Mitchell Clark
Jan 28
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US Defense Intelligence Agency admits to buying citizens’ location data

US Defense Intelligence Agency admits to buying citizens’ location data

Filed under:The agency claims it doesn’t need a warrant to collect the infoAn intelligence agency has just confirmed that the US government does indeed buy location data collected by its citizens’ smartphones. In a memo sent to and , the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) admitted that it buys location data from brokers — and that the data isn’t separated by whether a person lives in the US or outside of it.Data brokers are companies that, as the name implies, collect and sell people’s information. The companies by paying app makers and websites for it. Once the broker has the information,...

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Mitchell Clark
Jan 22
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Apple is blocking Apple Silicon Mac users from sideloading iPhone apps

Apple is blocking Apple Silicon Mac users from sideloading iPhone apps

Filed under:You can now only install iPhone apps from the Mac App StoreApple has turned off users’ ability to unofficially install iOS apps onto their M1 Macs (). While iOS apps are still available in the Mac App Store, many apps, such as Dark Sky and Netflix, don’t have their developer’s approval to be run on macOS. Up until now, that allowed the use of third-party software to install the apps without having to use the Mac App Store, but it seems like Apple has remotely disabled it.When we tried to install an unsupported app on an M1 Mac running macOS 11.1, we got an error message saying...

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Mitchell Clark
Jan 15
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Federal courts go low-tech for sensitive documents following SolarWinds hack

Federal courts go low-tech for sensitive documents following SolarWinds hack

Filed under:Public document access won’t be affected, but sensitive documents are moving offlineThe list of companies and agencies discovering that they’ve been is still growing, and they’re working with a big unknown: how far the hackers got into their systems. The federal judiciary system is likely now one of them (), and it isn’t taking any chances. It’s worried enough that court workers will now have to physically deliver sensitive documents, despite the ongoing pandemic.The judiciary’s sound rather intense:Under the new procedures announced today, highly sensitive court documents...

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Mitchell Clark
Jan 7
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Apple patents point to using your MacBook to wirelessly charge your iPhone and Apple Watch

Apple patents point to using your MacBook to wirelessly charge your iPhone and Apple Watch

Filed under:It’s a feature present on some Android phones, but turned to 11Apple has been granted two patents that describe adding two-way wireless charging to its devices (). The patents, first , include drawings that show a MacBook charging various devices, including an iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch, as well as drawings of iPads and iPhones doing the same.If this sounds familiar, it’s because have released devices with similar . Although Apple’s take is a little different. According to the patent images, a MacBook’s lid, palm rest, or trackpad could be used to charge a wireless...

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Mitchell Clark
Jan 5
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Jack Dorsey says proposed cryptocurrency regulation would create "perverse incentives"

Jack Dorsey says proposed cryptocurrency regulation would create "perverse incentives"

Filed under:The Square CEO warns that the regulations could lead to cryptocurrency transactions being less visible, not moreJack Dorsey, the CEO of Twitter and Square, isn’t happy about the new . He emphasized how the regulation would hurt Square, a financial services company, in a letter posted to the company website.In October, Square . The company also has invested heavily in the cryptocurrency ecosystem, so Square has plenty of skin in the game. The regulations create “unnecessary friction and perverse incentives for cryptocurrency customers to avoid regulated entities for...

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Mitchell Clark
Jan 4
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Apple pulls iPhone app promoting secret parties during the COVID-19 pandemic

Apple pulls iPhone app promoting secret parties during the COVID-19 pandemic

Filed under:Vybe Together urged users to ‘get your rebel on’An iOS app called Vybe Together that promoted private parties during the COVID-19 pandemic has been removed from the Apple App Store, had its account on TikTok banned, and scrubbed most of its online presence. The app’s creators told The Verge that Apple was the one to take it off the App Store.Vybe Together billed itself on TikTok and as a place to organize and attend underground parties, using the tagline “Get your rebel on. Get your party on.” Organizers would have to approve everyone who wanted to attend, and those who got...

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Adi Robertson
Dec 30
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Your car may be recording more data than you know

Your car may be recording more data than you know

Filed under:Information from vehicles has been used to solve crimes, and for more nefarious purposesWhen we think about privacy and who can access our location data, we’re often , and not on the machine that actually takes us places: our car. A goes into just how much data is collected by our vehicles, and how it can be used by police and criminals alike.Your car, depending on how new it is and what capabilities it has, could be collecting all sorts of data without your knowledge — including location data, when its doors were opened, and even recordings of your voice. The NBC article uses...

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Mitchell Clark
Dec 28
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Nuro can now charge for robot deliveries in California

Nuro can now charge for robot deliveries in California

Filed under:The permit allows them to charge for human-free deliveriesNuro is now the first company in California that’s allowed to operate autonomous cars commercially (). The company received a permit that allowed it earlier this year, but this permit will allow the firm to actually charge people for the service.According to , the company is planning to “announce [its] first deployment in California with an established partner.” Who that partner is remains to be seen, but it’s likely to be a delivery service that can make use of Nuro’s completely driverless Prius vehicles, though the...

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Mitchell Clark
Dec 23
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Nearly half a billion users played Among Us in November

Nearly half a billion users played Among Us in November

Filed under:That’s so many tasks left undoneWith reportedly playing it in November, Among Us has had the most monthly players for a mobile game ever, beating giants and Candy Crush Saga. According to Nielsen’s SuperData, the game is “by far the most popular game ever in terms of monthly players.”The success is even more remarkable because InnerSloth — the company that makes Among Us — . That’s roughly 125 million players per person who works on the game. It’s proven to be so popular that the studio decided to and just put all its effort into improving the original. It even caught the...

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Mitchell Clark
Dec 23
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Big tech companies including Intel, Nvidia, and Cisco were all infected during the SolarWinds hack

Big tech companies including Intel, Nvidia, and Cisco were all infected during the SolarWinds hack

Filed under:The full extent of the hack is still being investigatedLast week, news broke that IT management company SolarWinds had been hacked, , and the US Treasury, Commerce, State, Energy, and Homeland Security departments have been affected — as a result of the hack. Other government agencies and many companies are investigating due to SolarWinds’ extensive client list. The Wall Street Journal is now reporting that .Cisco, Intel, Nvidia, Belkin, and VMware have all had computers on their networks infected with the malware. There could be far more: SolarWinds had stated that “fewer than...

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Mitchell Clark
Dec 21
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Google and Apple are banning technology for sharing users’ location data

Google and Apple are banning technology for sharing users’ location data

Filed under:Developers have been given a week or two to remove the tracking techYou may have never heard of the company X-Mode Social, but its code may be in some of the apps on your phone, tracking and selling your location data. Now, Google and Apple are trying to put a stop to it. According to a , the tech companies have told developers to remove X-Mode’s code from their apps, or risk getting them pulled from their respective app stores.X-Mode works by giving developers code to put into their apps, known as an SDK, which tracks users’ location and then sends that data to X-Mode, which...

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Mitchell Clark
Dec 11
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Your 7-year fear of Americans legally getting to make in-flight calls has come to an end

Your 7-year fear of Americans legally getting to make in-flight calls has come to an end

Filed under:One less thing to worry about when we all start flying againThe next time you get on a plane, you’ll probably have plenty of new things to worry about, but having to listen to people talking on the phone won’t be one. Way back in 2013, that it would be considering removing a ban on passengers making phone calls once the plane was above 10,000 feet. The proposal was unpopular even within the FCC, with he would prefer people not be allowed to make calls on a plane.The FCC originally announced that it would be considering the proposal on December 12 (of 2013), but it to reach a...

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Mitchell Clark
Dec 4
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