Nicoletta Lanese
Nicoletta Lanese
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Person who had measles 100 years ago helps scientists trace origins of virus

Person who had measles 100 years ago helps scientists trace origins of virus

TrendingLive Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Formalin-fixed lung of 1912 measles patient(Image: © Navena Widulin/Berlin Museum of Medical History at the Charité)A diseased human lung, fixed in the preservative formalin for more than 100 years, helped scientists trace the history of the measles virus and place its origin as far back as the sixth century B.C.For years, the lung sat in the basement of the Berlin Museum of Medical History along with hundreds of other lung specimens, all collected and...

June 18, 2020
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Chlamydia cousin discovered in deep Arctic Ocean

Chlamydia cousin discovered in deep Arctic Ocean

TrendingLive Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Illustration of Chlamydia bacteria(Image: © Shutterstock)Deep under the Arctic Ocean seafloor lurks several newfound species of chlamydia bacteria. The species, cousins to the one that causes the sexually transmitted infection (STI), seem to survive despite a lack of oxygen and obvious hosts to prey upon, new research suggests.    is the most commonly reported STI in the U.S., with an estimated 2.86 million infections occurring each year, according to the . The...

March 10, 2020
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Blind people could 'see' letters that scientists drew on their brains with electricity

Blind people could 'see' letters that scientists drew on their brains with electricity

TrendingLive Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.(Image: © Shutterstock)Scientists sent patterns of electricity coursing across people's brains, coaxing their brains to see letters that weren't there. The experiment worked in both sighted people and blind participants who had lost their sight in adulthood, according to the study, published today (May 14) in the journal . Although this technology remains in its early days, implanted devices could potentially be used in the future to stimulate the brain and...

May 14, 2020
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