Pien Huang
Pien Huang
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RECENT ARTICLES
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'You Can't Treat If You Can't Empathize': Black Doctors Tackle Vaccine Hesitancy

'You Can't Treat If You Can't Empathize': Black Doctors Tackle Vaccine Hesitancy

To Overcome Vaccine Hesitancy Among Black Americans, Doctors Inform And Empower : Shots - Health News Black vaccine hesitancy goes back to history of distrust of medicine, say doctors and researchers. To help, it's important to empower people with knowledge to make their own choices.Black Americans have been catching the coronavirus, getting severely ill and dying from it, than other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. Black Americans are also less likely to want to get the COVID-19 vaccine, according to polls. A survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation last month found that around are not...

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Pien Huang
Jan 19
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Coronavirus FAQ: Do Airplane Passengers Not Know There's A Pandemic Going On?

Coronavirus FAQ: Do Airplane Passengers Not Know There's A Pandemic Going On?

Flying In The Pandemic: How To Cope With Folks Who Ignore Risk Reduction Rules : Goats and Soda Our correspondent took a flight Sunday and saw a number of concerning things in airports and on planes. So many questions were raised. We went in search of answers.Sheila Mulrooney EldredEach week, we answer "frequently asked questions" about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions." When I booked a flight from Boston to Washington, D.C., in mid-January, I knew that...

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Sheila Mulrooney Eldred
Jan 15
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Air Travelers To U.S. Must Test Negative For COVID-19 Before Boarding

Air Travelers To U.S. Must Test Negative For COVID-19 Before Boarding

Air Travelers To U.S. Must Test Negative For COVID-19 Before Boarding Any air passengers flying to the U.S. will have to test negative for COVID-19. The CDC policy takes effect later this month and require passengers to get tested within 3 days of their flight.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsAny air passengers flying to the U.S. will have to test negative for COVID-19. The CDC policy takes effect later this month and require passengers to get tested within 3 days of their flight.RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:Important news for people intending to fly to the U.S. - the CDC has announced...

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Pien Huang
Jan 13
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Here's How The U.S. Can Jump Start Its Sluggish COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout

Here's How The U.S. Can Jump Start Its Sluggish COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout

5 Ways To Speed Up The U.S. Vaccine Rollout : Shots - Health News With case and death counts still surging, the pressure is on to vaccinate as many people as possible. Here's what it will take to get more Americans their shots, fast.This time last year, the world was heading into a pandemic that would upend everything and cost 1.9 million lives — and counting. The promise of the new year is that vaccines are finally here and offer a way out. But the vaccination campaign has gotten off to a sluggish start in the U.S. Instead of 20 million people vaccinated by the end of 2020 — a frequent...

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Jan 8
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Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine

Black Doctors Use Social Media To Share Accurate Information About COVID-19 Vaccine A third of Black Americans are hesitant to get a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll. Some Black doctors are finding creative ways to encourage vaccine acceptance.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsA third of Black Americans are hesitant to get a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll. Some Black doctors are finding creative ways to encourage vaccine acceptance.AILSA CHANG, HOST:About a quarter of the American public is hesitant to get a COVID-19...

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Pien Huang
Jan 1
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Challenges Related To The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout

Challenges Related To The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout

Challenges Related To The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout The first COVID-19 vaccines are being administered. There are, however, still great challenges ahead when it comes to making sure that people receive the vaccine sooner rather than later.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsThe first COVID-19 vaccines are being administered. There are, however, still great challenges ahead when it comes to making sure that people receive the vaccine sooner rather than later.NPR thanks our sponsors

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Martha Bebinger
Dec 15
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CDC Advisers Agree With FDA: COVID-19 Vaccine Is OK For Public Use

CDC Advisers Agree With FDA: COVID-19 Vaccine Is OK For Public Use

CDC Panel Votes To Recommend COVID-19 Vaccine But Distribution Remains Tricky : Shots - Health News An independent federal advisory committee to the CDC recommends the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for people over 16. But state health leaders say distribution and funding challenges remain.Carmel WrothAn important federal advisory committee at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has added its vote of support for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. In an emergency meeting Saturday, the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted to recommend the first COVID-19 vaccine for...

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
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Dec 12
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New COVID-19 Data Release Shows Where Hospitals Around The Country Are Filling Up

New COVID-19 Data Release Shows Where Hospitals Around The Country Are Filling Up

Federal Government Releases Local Hospitalizations Data Showing Hot Spots : Shots - Health News The federal government has released detailed local data on where hospitals are starting to fill up with patients. Researchers and health leaders say this was urgently needed.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsNew data released by the Department of Health and Human Services on Monday gives the most detailed picture to date of how COVID-19 is stressing individual hospitals in the United States. The information provides nationwide data on hospital capacity and bed use at a...

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Pien Huang
Dec 8
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Some Health Care Workers Are Wary Of Getting COVID-19 Vaccines

Some Health Care Workers Are Wary Of Getting COVID-19 Vaccines

Some Health Care Workers Are Wary Of Getting COVID-19 Vaccines Health care workers are expected to get a COVID-19 vaccine first. But the speed of vaccine development, and the politicization of the process, has left some doctors and nurses skeptical and reluctant.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsHealth care workers are expected to get a COVID-19 vaccine first. But the speed of vaccine development, and the politicization of the process, has left some doctors and nurses skeptical and reluctant.NPR thanks our sponsors

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Pien Huang
Nov 24
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Operation Warp Speed's Logistics Chief Weighs In On Vaccine Progress

Operation Warp Speed's Logistics Chief Weighs In On Vaccine Progress

A COVID-19 Vaccine Could Begin Deployment In U.S. In December, If FDA-Approved : Shots - Health News Gen. Gustave Perna says as soon as the FDA deems a vaccine safe and effective, his team is ready to coordinate deployment of tens of millions of doses as early as next month.Toggle more optionsToggle more optionsA top U.S. Army general who is co-leading the federal COVID-19 vaccine initiative anticipates that the first of millions of Americans could start receiving COVID-19 vaccines as soon as next month. "I think a safe and effective vaccine will be available initially in December," told...

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Pien Huang
Nov 10
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First COVID-19 Vaccine Doses To Go To Health Workers, Say CDC Advisers

First COVID-19 Vaccine Doses To Go To Health Workers, Say CDC Advisers

First COVID-19 Vaccine Doses To Go To Health Workers, Say CDC Advisers : Shots - Health News A team of independent advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a science-based outline for deploying a vaccine when it's ready. The goal is to stop deaths and viral spread fast.Toggle more optionsToggle more optionsHealth care workers will almost certainly get the first doses of COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S. when one is approved, according to Dr. José Romero, head of the committee that develops evidence-based immunization guidelines for the Centers for Disease Control and...

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Pien Huang
Nov 5
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Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

Who Should Get The COVID-19 Vaccine First? CDC Advisory Group Mulls Strategy : Shots - Health News In advance of a COVID-19 vaccine being available, a group of independent medical advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention weighed Friday who should get the vaccine first and how.Toggle more optionsToggle more optionsStates should be working toward being ready to give out COVID-19 vaccines by Nov. 15, according to a target date made public by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday. That's an aspirational date so far — there is still no vaccine approved for...

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Joe Neel
Oct 30
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Advisers To CDC Discuss Potential Coronavirus Vaccines

Advisers To CDC Discuss Potential Coronavirus Vaccines

Advisers To CDC Discuss Potential Coronavirus Vaccines Advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention met virtually Friday to review what's known about potential coronavirus vaccines. The main issue is who should get a vaccine first.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsAdvisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention met virtually Friday to review what's known about potential coronavirus vaccines. The main issue is who should get a vaccine first.AILSA CHANG, HOST:A group of advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention met virtually today to...

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Pien Huang
Oct 30
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Internal Documents Reveal COVID-19 Hospitalization Data The Government Keeps Hidden

Internal Documents Reveal COVID-19 Hospitalization Data The Government Keeps Hidden

Federal Documents Show Which Hospitals Are Filling Up With COVID Patients : Shots - Health News Where are hospitals reaching capacity? Which metro areas are running out of beds? NPR has learned federal agencies collect and analyze this information in detail but don't share it with the public.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsAs coronavirus cases rise swiftly around the country, surpassing both the spring and summer surges, health officials brace for a coming wave of hospitalizations and deaths. Knowing which hospitals in which communities are reaching capacity could be key to an...

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Oct 30
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Facing Many Unknowns, States Rush To Plan Distribution Of COVID-19 Vaccines

Facing Many Unknowns, States Rush To Plan Distribution Of COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Will Be Challenging. States Rush To Plan Ahead : Shots - Health News A vaccine will only work if a lot of people can get immunized. State health officials are working furiously to design outreach and distribution plans, with little clarity from the federal government.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsUpdated at 1 pm, to include comment from the White House and the Department of Health and Human Services Even the most effective, safest coronavirus vaccine won't work to curb the spread of the virus unless a large number of people get immunized. And...

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Selena Simmons-Duffin
Oct 16
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Past CDC Director Urges Current One To Stand Up To Trump

Past CDC Director Urges Current One To Stand Up To Trump

Former CDC Director Says Agency Has Gone From "Gold to Tarnished Brass" : Coronavirus Live Updates In a private, leaked letter, a former CDC director urges Dr. Robert Redfield to stand up for public health and stop the "slaughter" caused by COVID-19 in the U.S.Dr. William Foege doesn't know how his private letter to the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Robert Redfield, got leaked — but he stands by its contents. "I think we've got about the worst response to this pandemic that you could possibly have," said Foege, who served as CDC director from 1977 to 1983,...

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Pien Huang
Oct 8
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Hospitals Failing To Meet New COVID-19 Data Reporting Mandate To Get Warning Letters

Hospitals Failing To Meet New COVID-19 Data Reporting Mandate To Get Warning Letters

Hospitals May Lose Federal Funding For Not Reporting Daily COVID-19 Data : Shots - Health News New enforcement guidelines are now in place, pushing hospitals to comply with rigorous reporting requirements, or risk losing a crucial funding stream from the federal government.The federal government is starting to crack down on the nation's hospitals for not reporting complete COVID-19 data into a federal data collection system. The enforcement timeline starts Wednesday, said Seema Verma, administrator for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in a call with reporters Tuesday. to...

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Pien Huang
Oct 7
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Trump's Missed Opportunities To Personally Stop The Spread Of The Coronavirus

Trump's Missed Opportunities To Personally Stop The Spread Of The Coronavirus

Trump Repeatedly Raised His Risk Of Spreading COVID-19 : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus The president's missteps after being exposed to the coronavirus have amplified the risks of spreading it to others and undermined the recommendations of public health officials.Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET Last Thursday afternoon, when Hope Hicks tested positive for the coronavirus, President Trump was aboard Marine One, at his New Jersey golf club. Hicks, a top Trump aide, had traveled with the president to a Minnesota fundraiser and rally the day before and reportedly felt ill on the...

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Pien Huang
Oct 6
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Why A Negative Coronavirus Test Doesn't Necessarily Mean You're In The Clear

Why A Negative Coronavirus Test Doesn't Necessarily Mean You're In The Clear

Trump's Close Contacts Report Negative Test Results. Are They In The Clear? : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus Political figures who had contact with the president in the past week are being tested — and reporting negative results. Doctors sound a note of caution about what those results indicate.Several members of Congress and cabinet members who've spent time with President Trump in the last week were tested for coronavirus — and have announced the result was negative. But that doesn't mean they're in the clear. These results could be a false negative — which are common...

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Pien Huang
Oct 2
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Examining The Ethics Involved When Distributing A COVID-19 Vaccine

Examining The Ethics Involved When Distributing A COVID-19 Vaccine

Examining The Ethics Involved When Distributing A COVID-19 Vaccine When a COVID-19 vaccine is approved, who gets first dibs? Bioethicists say the focus should be on saving the lives of people most at risk. Frontline health workers go first, but the rest is trickier.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsWhen a COVID-19 vaccine is approved, who gets first dibs? Bioethicists say the focus should be on saving the lives of people most at risk. Frontline health workers go first, but the rest is trickier.NPR thanks our sponsors

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Pien Huang
Sep 22
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Researchers Say Fresh Air Can Prevent Aerosol Transmission Of The Coronavirus

Researchers Say Fresh Air Can Prevent Aerosol Transmission Of The Coronavirus

Researchers Say Fresh Air Can Prevent Aerosol Transmission Of The Coronavirus There's increasing evidence that the coronavirus can linger and spread through the air in crowded indoor rooms. Researchers say infectious clouds can be dispersed with fresh air.Toggle more optionsHeard onToggle more optionsThere's increasing evidence that the coronavirus can linger and spread through the air in crowded indoor rooms. Researchers say infectious clouds can be dispersed with fresh air.AILSA CHANG, HOST:Researchers say there is increasing evidence that in crowded indoor spaces, the coronavirus is...

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Pien Huang
Sep 7
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