Ronen Bergman
Ronen Bergman
The New York Times, Yedioth Ahronoth, Author of “Rise and Kill First", a Mossad History. One of writers of "a long & boring story" according to @realDonaldTrumpSource
Tel Aviv, Israel
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The Scientist and the A.I.-Assisted, Remote-Control Killing Machine

The Scientist and the A.I.-Assisted, Remote-Control Killing Machine

Iran’s top nuclear scientist woke up an hour before dawn, as he did most days, to study Islamic philosophy before his day began. That afternoon, he and his wife would leave their vacation home on the Caspian Sea and drive to their country house in Absard, a bucolic town east of Tehran, where they planned to spend the weekend. Iran’s intelligence service had warned him of a possible assassination plot, but the scientist, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, had brushed it off. Convinced that Mr. Fakhrizadeh was leading Iran’s efforts to build a nuclear bomb, Israel had wanted to kill him for at least 14...

Sep 24
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Israel’s Spy Agency Snubbed the U.S. Can Trust Be Restored?

Israel’s Spy Agency Snubbed the U.S. Can Trust Be Restored?

Israel’s new prime minister, Naftali Bennett, heads to Washington promising better relations and seeking support for covert attacks on Iran’s nuclear program. The cable sent this year by the outgoing C.I.A. officer in charge of building spy networks in Iran reverberated throughout the intelligence agency’s Langley headquarters, officials say: America’s network of informers had largely been lost to Tehran’s brutally efficient counterintelligence operations, which has stymied efforts to rebuild it. Israel has helped fill the breach, officials say, its robust operations in Iran providing the...

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Aug 26
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Leaked Iranian Intelligence Reports Expose Tehran’s Vast Web of Influence in Iraq

Leaked Iranian Intelligence Reports Expose Tehran’s Vast Web of Influence in Iraq

In mid-October, with unrest swirling in Baghdad, a familiar visitor slipped quietly into the Iraqi capital. The city had been under siege for weeks, as protesters marched in the streets, demanding an end to corruption and calling for the ouster of the prime minister, Adil Abdul-Mahdi. In particular, they denounced the outsize influence of their neighbor Iran in Iraqi politics, burning Iranian flags and attacking an Iranian consulate. The visitor was there to restore order, but his presence highlighted the protesters’ biggest grievance: He was Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, head of Iran’s...

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November 20, 2019
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