Sarah Gibbens
Sarah Gibbens
Environment journalist @NatGeo | Previously at National Journal | Tejana | send tips/questions ➡️ sarah.gibbens@natgeo.comSource
Washington, DC
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Will warming spring temperatures slow the coronavirus outbreak?

Will warming spring temperatures slow the coronavirus outbreak?

Please be respectful of copyright. Unauthorized use is prohibited.Whether the coronavirus that’s quickly spreading around the world will follow the flu season and subside with spring’s arrival is unsatisfyingly uncertain, and many scientists say it’s too soon to know how the dangerous virus will behave in warmer weather.Dozens of viruses exist in the coronavirus family, but only seven afflict humans. Four are known to cause mild colds in people, while others are more novel, deadly, and thought to be transmitted from animals like bats and camels. Health officials have labeled this new virus...

March 10, 2020
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Ginkgo trees nearly went extinct. Here’s how we saved these ‘living fossils.’

Ginkgo trees nearly went extinct. Here’s how we saved these ‘living fossils.’

These ancient trees persisted for nearly 200 million years until they all but vanished. Now they line city streets.On the streets of Manhattan and Washington, D.C., in neighborhoods in Seoul and parks in Paris, ginkgo trees are gradually losing their bright yellow leaves in reaction to the first bout of frigid winter air.This leaf drop, gradual at first, and then suddenly, carpets streets with golden, fan-shaped leaves every year. But around the world, are of the event happening later and later, a possible indication of climate change.“People would ask us, ‘When should I come out to see...

November 30, 2020
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New Atlantic marine sanctuary will be one of world's largest

New Atlantic marine sanctuary will be one of world's largest

Whales, sharks, seals, tens of millions of seabirds, and just under 300 humans inhabit the small islands that make up Tristan da Cunha.The waters around one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands, in the middle of the South Atlantic Ocean, are set to become the fourth largest completely protected marine area in the world, and the largest in the Atlantic.Tristan da Cunha, a British territory, is 2,300 miles east of South America and 1,600 miles west of South Africa. To reach it requires a seven-day boat trip from South Africa, and once you’re there, “you feel so much like you’re at the...

November 13, 2020
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How Hurricane Laura hastened Louisiana’s rapidly disappearing wetlands

How Hurricane Laura hastened Louisiana’s rapidly disappearing wetlands

Strong storms temporarily change an ecosystem, and over time, they could help permanently alter it.

September 11, 2020
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How to compost—and why it’s good for the environment

How to compost—and why it’s good for the environment

Please be respectful of copyright. Unauthorized use is prohibited.About a around the world goes to waste, and much of it ends up in landfills—where it becomes a source of methane, a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide. , but some will always remain. For that there is a solution that nearly anyone can do: composting.Composting turns rotting garbage into a valuable soil enhancer that helps plants thrive. Farmers call it “black gold.” And whether you compost in your backyard or at a community facility, experts say it will reduce your trash and in a small way help fight climate...

Mar 30
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