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Wee footprint of baby stegosaur discovered in China

Wee footprint of baby stegosaur discovered in China

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.A hundred million years ago, a wee baby stegosaur pranced around on its hind feet in what is today China. The footprint of this adorable, cat-size tot from the was discovered in Xinjiang, a territory in northwest China. At only 2.25 inches (5.7 centimeters) long, it's the smallest stegosaur print ever found, the authors reported March 3 .The site where the tiny prints were found was also pock-marked with large footprints from stegosaurs — a group of herbivorous...

Apr 19
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HIV vaccine stimulates 'rare immune cells' in early human trials

HIV vaccine stimulates 'rare immune cells' in early human trials

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.A new vaccine for is raising excitement after its first in-human trials showed 97% success at stimulating a rare set of immune cells that play a key role in fighting the virus. The approach is a new attempt to head off the fast-mutating human immunodeficiency virus, which has eluded vaccines in the past because it attacks part of the immune system directly and is good at evading other immune defenses. Developed by scientists at Scripps Research in San Diego and the...

Apr 7
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Humans Have The Biological Toolkit to Have Venomous Saliva, Study Finds

Humans Have The Biological Toolkit to Have Venomous Saliva, Study Finds

Could humans ever evolve venom? It's highly unlikely that people will join  and  among the ranks of venomous animals, but new research reveals that humans do have the tool kit to produce venom - in fact, all reptiles and mammals do. This collection of flexible genes, particularly associated with the salivary glands in humans, explains how venom has evolved independently from nonvenomous ancestors more than 100 times in the animal kingdom."Essentially, we have all the building blocks in place," said study co-author Agneesh Barua, a doctoral student in evolutionary genetics at the Okinawa...

Mar 30
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Why Russian scientists just deployed a giant telescope beneath Lake Baikal

Why Russian scientists just deployed a giant telescope beneath Lake Baikal

TrendingSpace is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Russian scientists have deployed a giant telescope into the frigid depths of in southern Siberia to search for the tiniest known particles in the universe. The telescope, Baikal-GVD, is designed to search for , which are nearly massless subatomic particles with no electrical charge. Neutrinos are everywhere, but they interact so weakly with the forces around them that they're hugely challenging to detect.That's why scientists are looking under Lake Baikal, which, at...

Mar 22
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Ultrapowerful magnetic fields revealed in 1st ever image of a black hole

Ultrapowerful magnetic fields revealed in 1st ever image of a black hole

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.First-of-their-kind images of the magnetic field around a black hole may explain how the black hole shoots out a jet of energy and matter more than 5,000 light-years into space. The new images come from the first black hole ever photographed, which sits at the center of Messier 87, a giant elliptical galaxy 55 million light-years away. In 2017, an international collaboration of more than 300 researchers coordinated 11 radio telescopes around the globe to observe the...

Mar 24
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Meet the swirlon, a new kind of matter that bends the laws of physics

Meet the swirlon, a new kind of matter that bends the laws of physics

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Fish school, insects swarm and birds fly in murmurations. Now, new research finds that on the most basic level, this kind of group behavior forms a new kind of active matter, called a swirlonic state. Physical laws such as — which states that as a force applied to an object increases, its acceleration increases, and that as the object's mass increases, its acceleration decreases — apply to passive, nonliving matter, ranging from atoms to planets. But much of the matter...

Mar 1
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Rare red sprite and blue jet create otherworldly light show above Hawaii

Rare red sprite and blue jet create otherworldly light show above Hawaii

TrendingSpace is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.Sprites and jets are fleeting atmospheric phenomena, hard enough to witness, let alone photograph. But a new image from an observatory in Hawaii captures both a red sprite and a blue jet in the same shot. The photo, , comes courtesy a "cloud cam" at the Gemini North telescope, part of the International Gemini Observatory located on Maunakea. Sprites and jets are upper-atmospheric phenomena caused by electrical discharges. Sprites, which are typically reddish-orange...

Mar 2
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Lumpy, 30-pound meteorite that crashed in Sweden recovered in local village

Lumpy, 30-pound meteorite that crashed in Sweden recovered in local village

TrendingSpace is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.A half-melted hunk of iron-rich rock found in Uppsala, Sweden, is part of a meteorite that fell there in November 2020. The lumpy meteorite is about the size of a loaf of bread and weighs around 31 pounds (14 kilograms), according to the Swedish Museum of Natural History. It was once part of a larger space rock, probably weighing more than 9 tons (8.1 metric tons), that created a over Uppsala on Nov. 7. After that impact, scientists at the Swedish Museum of Natural...

Mar 1
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Dinosaur-killing space rock may have originated at the edge of the solar system

Dinosaur-killing space rock may have originated at the edge of the solar system

TrendingSpace is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.The chunk of space rock that killed the nonavian may have been a piece of a comet that Jupiter's gravity kicked onto a collision course with Earth. A new study suggests that the dinosaur-killing object was not an asteroid from between Jupiter and Mars, as is often hypothesized. Instead, the study authors argue, the impactor was a piece of a comet from the Oort cloud, a mass of icy bodies that surrounds the outer edges of the solar system. So-called long-period comets...

Feb 22
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'Flatliners' still have heartbeats left. But death comes within 5 minutes.

'Flatliners' still have heartbeats left. But death comes within 5 minutes.

Live Science is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.(Image: © Shutterstock)Death is not a linear process. New research finds that it's fairly common for the to restart — usually just for a beat or two — after a person initially flatlines. No one in the study, which took place in intensive care units (ICUs) in three countries, survived or even regained consciousness. The longest gap between someone's heart stopping and restarting again was 4 minutes and 20 seconds. That's an important number, according to study leader...

Jan 29
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