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Canada's vaccine deliveries further threatened as Europe mulls export controls

Canada's vaccine deliveries further threatened as Europe mulls export controls

OTTAWA --Canada's anxiety-laden COVID-19 vaccine programs are facing further threats as Europe warns drug makers it might impose export controls on European-made vaccine doses.All of Canada's current vaccine doses from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna are made in Europe, potentially putting at risk the entirety of Canada's vaccine deliveries.Europe -- like Canada -- is being shorted on deliveries from Pfizer as the company slows production to expand its plant in Belgium.But AstraZeneca has also now informed Europe productions issues will reduce initial deliveries of its vaccine, which Europe is...

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The Canadian Press
3h ago
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Canada's spy-catching system caused delay, angst in Delisle case: former FBI official

Canada's spy-catching system caused delay, angst in Delisle case: former FBI official

OTTAWA --The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation's former head of counter-intelligence says it fell to him to tell the RCMP about a spy in the Canadian navy, even though the Canadian Security Intelligence Service was already well aware of Jeffrey Delisle's sale of sensitive secrets to the Russians.In a newly published book, Frank Figliuzzi casts a critical eye on the Delisle case, pointing to the episode as a prime illustration of systemic problems with how Canadian agencies investigate espionage.As a sub-lieutenant at the Trinity intelligence centre in Halifax, Delisle had access to a...

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The Canadian Press
Jan 17
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Proud Boys confrontation was wake-up call about military racism, hate: Defence chief

Proud Boys confrontation was wake-up call about military racism, hate: Defence chief

OTTAWA --The outgoing commander of Canada's military says he first realized the Canadian Armed Forces had a real problem with hate and racism three years ago, when navy sailors identifying themselves as "Proud Boys" confronted Indigenous protesters in Halifax.Captured on video, the confrontation in July 2017 propelled the right-wing group, which officials are considering adding to Canada's list of terrorist organizations, into the public consciousness.Gen. Jonathan Vance says it also embarrassed the military -- and served as a wake-up call about the threat that hate and racism pose to the...

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The Canadian Press
Jan 13
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Canadian economy lost 63,000 jobs in Dec., first decline since April

Canadian economy lost 63,000 jobs in Dec., first decline since April

AdvertisementOTTAWA --Canada posted its first monthly decline in jobs since April amid tightened public health restrictions in December, and economists warn the losses are likely to continue as the number of new COVID-19 cases continue to rise.Friday the economy lost 63,000 jobs in December while the unemployment rate edged up to 8.6 per cent compared with 8.5 per cent in November.Had it included in the calculations Canadians who wanted to work last month but didn't search for a job, the unemployment rate would have been 10.9 per cent in December, unchanged from November."Due to both the...

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The Canadian Press
Jan 8
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U.S. aquarium agrees to delay acquisition of Marineland belugas amid lawsuit

U.S. aquarium agrees to delay acquisition of Marineland belugas amid lawsuit

AdvertisementA Connecticut aquarium has agreed to delay its acquisition of five beluga whales from an Ontario wildlife theme park amid a lawsuit by an animal rights group trying to stop the delivery.Mystic Aquarium will not import the whales from Marineland before March 31 to allow time for a judge to decide the lawsuit and avoid an effort by Friends of Animals to obtain a preliminary injunction to stop the delivery, according to documents filed in federal court in Hartford on Dec. 23.Friends of Animals, based in Darien, Conn., filed the lawsuit in September, saying the five belugas would...

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The Canadian Press
Jan 2
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Canadian companies paying bonuses -- and even increasing them amid COVID-19

Canadian companies paying bonuses -- and even increasing them amid COVID-19

AdvertisementTORONTO --Canadian companies may have spent the past year laying off staff and dealing with temporary closures stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, but that isn't stopping many from rewarding workers this holiday season.Several, including the country's top banks, say they are planning to thank their staff for a year of hard work with year-end bonuses -- and some are even topping up the amount.An online survey of 600 senior managers from companies with 20 or more employees in Canada revealed 48 per cent plan to offer year-end bonuses this year.The survey conducted by consulting...

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The Canadian Press
Jan 3
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Dawn of Biden era offers new opportunities, old challenges for Canada-U.S. relations

Dawn of Biden era offers new opportunities, old challenges for Canada-U.S. relations

WASHINGTON, D.C. --If Donald Trump has anything in common with Canada, it might be this: a shared craving for the attention of the American people that at times can border on the pathological.Both could go through withdrawal symptoms in the new year.Whatever else history will say about the outgoing president, he had a knack for scratching that uniquely Canadian itch for acknowledgment from south of the border, even if it often left a painful welt.“South Park” fans might call it the “blame Canada” doctrine: Trump branded the country a national-security threat, an existential danger to U.S....

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James McCarten
Dec 23
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Unusual world junior men's hockey championship set to open in Edmonton

Unusual world junior men's hockey championship set to open in Edmonton

AdvertisementEDMONTON --A world junior men's hockey championship like no other opens Friday in Edmonton with zero spectators and teams walled off from the general public because of the COVID-19 pandemic.The world under-20 tournament at Rogers Place is modelled on the NHL's “bubble”, which allowed that league to complete the 2019-20 season in the same arena without any positive tests for the novel coronavirus over an eight-week span.Defending champion Canada opens the tournament Saturday against Germany.Shorter in duration with fewer personnel than when the NHL post-season “bubble” started,...

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The Canadian Press
Dec 23
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Wildfires take over from industry as major source of cancer-causing air toxins: study

Wildfires take over from industry as major source of cancer-causing air toxins: study

AdvertisementWildfires have taken over from industry as a major source of a group of cancer-causing chemical toxins in the air, Environment Canada says.The first national assessment of polycyclic aromatic compounds in more than 25 years has found that air has improved around aluminum and steel plants. But wildfires and vehicles have stepped in to keep average concentrations at about the same level that they were in the 1990s, says federal researcher Elisabeth Galarneau."Those big industrial point sources have been reduced to a very small fraction of the total," she says. "The largest...

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The Canadian Press
Dec 14
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U.S. prosecutors say Montreal men ran $1M telemarketing scam

U.S. prosecutors say Montreal men ran $1M telemarketing scam

AdvertisementMONTREAL --Federal prosecutors in the United States say they've charged five Quebec men with running a telemarketing scam that allegedly stole more than $1 million.The U.S. Department of Justice claims the men called people across the United States, telling them that they owed money for magazine subscriptions and that their credit would be damaged or they could face legal action if they didn't pay.Prosecutors say in a news release Tuesday that the men, who are from Montreal's West Island, continued to call victims who did pay, telling them they had additional debts.U.S....

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The Canadian Press
Dec 9
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Wartime disease diagnosed four times in Winnipeg

Wartime disease diagnosed four times in Winnipeg

AdvertisementWINNIPEG --As an infectious diseases specialist, Dr. Carl Boodman has had a longtime interest in an illness that commonly afflicted soldiers during the First World War as well as people who now live in crowded refugee camps.But Boodman had no idea when he encountered a case of trench fever in Winnipeg earlier this year that he'd soon be treating three more patients with the same condition and that all of them had spent time in a homeless shelter.Trench fever is transmitted through the feces of body lice, which can be left on clothing and trigger an itchy reaction causing people...

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The Canadian Press
Dec 7
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BlackBerry shares soar in wake of Amazon deal to develop vehicle data platform

BlackBerry shares soar in wake of Amazon deal to develop vehicle data platform

AdvertisementWATERLOO, ONT. --Shares in BlackBerry Ltd. gained as much as 63.9 per cent in intraday trading on Tuesday following news of a deal with Amazon Web Services to develop and market BlackBerry's intelligent vehicle data platform, called IVY.The stock traded as high as $12.54, up from Monday's close of $7.65, before drifting lower and closing at a new 52-week high of $9.08, up 18.7 per cent.The companies said they had settled on a multi-year, global agreement to develop and market IVY, a scalable, cloud-connected software platform that will give automakers a new way to read vehicle...

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The Canadian Press
Dec 1
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Elected officials dine out after urging others to stay home

Elected officials dine out after urging others to stay home

 San Francisco Mayor London Breed dined at a posh Napa Valley restaurant the day after California's governor was there. San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo went to his parents' house for Thanksgiving. And a Los Angeles County supervisor dined outdoors just hours after voting to ban outdoor dining there.All three local officials were on the hot seat Tuesday after various reports that they violated rules aimed at controlling the spread of the coronavirus — or at a minimum, violating the spirit of the rules as they repeatedly urged others to stay home.Breed joined seven others at the three...

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The Canadian Press
Dec 2
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MLSE cuts salaries for full-time staff, extends management and executive reductions

MLSE cuts salaries for full-time staff, extends management and executive reductions

AdvertisementTORONTO --Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment says it is cutting the salaries of up to one quarter of its full-time staff, and extending salary reductions for senior management and executives to deal with the financial impact of COVID-19.The company that owns Toronto professional sports teams including the Maple Leafs, the Raptors and the Argonauts as well as sports venues, says up to 25 per cent of full-time staff will be moved to temporary inactive status.Extended management and executive salary reductions will be effective Jan. 1.Affected employees will remain on MLSE...

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The Canadian Press
Dec 1
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Canadian Food Inspection Agency warns against consuming meat bottled by P.E.I. man

Canadian Food Inspection Agency warns against consuming meat bottled by P.E.I. man

AdvertisementCHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. --The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is warning against consuming beef and chicken that was bottled by a Prince Edward Island man and sold through classified ads in provincial newspapers.The agency said Thursday the meat products made by Robert Waite of Tignish, P.E.I., carry a risk of botulism. It said the meats sold in 500-millilitre jars with no labels, up to and including Nov. 26, should not be consumed.But the man behind the bottles of brined chicken and beef maintains there is nothing wrong with his product. "A little bit of salt goes in, a little...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 27
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Advocates aim to shape 'Vancouver model' for drug decriminalization

Advocates aim to shape 'Vancouver model' for drug decriminalization

City councillors in Vancouver voted unanimously this week to ask the federal government to decriminalize small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, a decision advocates hope will blaze a trail in other municipalities.It’s within Health Minister Patty Hajdu’s power to grant an exemption to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to allow decriminalization across Canada, said Sandra Ka Hon Chu, the director of research and advocacy for the Toronto-based HIV Legal Network.We apologize, but this video has failed to load.Try refreshing your browser, or.“She can issue a very sweeping...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 27
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Help from B.C. man allows American family to reunite in Alaska

Help from B.C. man allows American family to reunite in Alaska

A woman from Georgia says her family’s reunion was saved by a man from B.C. who drove them to the Alaskan border after she got stranded in a snowstorm and appealed for help.Lynn Marchessault began her trip with her two children, two dogs and a cat on Nov. 10 from Georgia to the Alaska border to join her husband, who is in the U.S. military.We apologize, but this video has failed to load.Try refreshing your browser, or.“I had never driven in the snow,” she said. “It was like a whiteout kind of snowstorm. I wasn’t really familiar with that or even knew what it was called until this day.”The...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 25
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Quebec City mosque shooter's sentence reduced by 15 years

Quebec City mosque shooter's sentence reduced by 15 years

AdvertisementQUEBEC CITY --The man who murdered six people in a Quebec City mosque in 2017 will be eligible to apply for parole in 25 years rather than 40, the province's highest court ruled Thursday as it declared the section of the Criminal Code allowing consecutive life sentences unconstitutional.Alexandre Bissonnette, 30, was sentenced in February 2019 to life in prison with no possibility of parole for 40 years.That sentence has been reduced to 25 years in Thursday's Quebec Court of Appeal decision, which took issue with a 2011 amendment to the Criminal Code that allowed life sentences...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 26
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Head of WHO praises Canada's anti-COVID response; warns vaccine won't be a panacea

Head of WHO praises Canada's anti-COVID response; warns vaccine won't be a panacea

SubscriptionTORONTO — Canada deserves praise for its efforts to fight COVID-19 both at home and abroad as well as for its commitment to public health, the head of the World Health Organization said on Tuesday.In a speech to the Empire Club of Canada, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the WHO, cited among other things, Ottawa’s $440-million donation to the organization’s anti-pandemic initiative.We apologize, but this video has failed to load.Try refreshing your browser, or.“This pandemic has reminded us of the importance of multilateralism, something that Canadians have...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 17
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Quebec Major Junior Hockey to bubble at the Videotron Centre

Quebec Major Junior Hockey to bubble at the Videotron Centre

AdvertisementLONGUEUIL --The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) announced Sunday that it will move forward with its plans to bubble players from Nov.17 to 27 at the Videotron Centre in Quebec City.This decision was adopted unanimously by the league’s board before being approved by Quebec Public Health.“The QMJHL has always and will continue to follow Public Health directives to ensure the safety of its participants, and this event will be no exception, '' read the league's press release.The Gatineau Olympiques, the Drummondville Voltigeurs, the Blainville-Boisbriand Armada, the...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 8
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Parks Canada plans first captive breeding program for Jasper National Park caribou

Parks Canada plans first captive breeding program for Jasper National Park caribou

AdvertisementEDMONTON --Caribou herds in Canada's Rocky Mountains are now so precarious that Parks Canada is preparing a plan to round up females from nearly vanished herds and pen them in a captive breeding program to replenish others.The highly invasive move is hinted at in an email distributed last week."Parks Canada has been investigating the feasibility of developing a caribou conservation breeding program and is now at the point where a proposal will undergo a review by external experts," the email said.A draft of the plan dated 2017 is outlined in documents obtained by The Canadian...

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The Canadian Press
Nov 2
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Trudeau says pandemic 'really sucks,' and that Christmas gatherings are up in the air

Trudeau says pandemic 'really sucks,' and that Christmas gatherings are up in the air

OTTAWA --Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the global COVID-19 pandemic "really sucks," and could jeopardize large gatherings with friends and family over Christmas after a reined-in Thanksgiving.Acknowledging frustrations around partial lockdowns and scrapped Halloween plans in some parts of the country, Trudeau said Tuesday that Canadians need to gird themselves for a "tough winter ahead" amid the second wave of the virus."It's frustrating to have to explain to your kids in many parts of the country, like here in Ottawa, that we're not going to be trick-or-treating this weekend. And it's...

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The Canadian Press
Oct 27
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The RCMP have 'let down' Indigenous fishers facing violence in Nova Scotia: minister

The RCMP have 'let down' Indigenous fishers facing violence in Nova Scotia: minister

AdvertisementOTTAWA --The RCMP in Nova Scotia have failed to properly protect Indigenous people embroiled in an ugly dispute over lobster fishing, Canada's Indigenous services minister said Monday.Marc Miller was one of four federal cabinet ministers who took part in a news conference that followed a turbulent weekend in the southwestern corner of the province, where a lobster pound was burned to the ground and police accused one person of assaulting a Mi'kmaq leader and another of setting fire to a van owned by an Indigenous fisherman."Indigenous people have been let down by the police,...

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The Canadian Press
Oct 19
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Goodbye, Asbestos, hello, Val-des-Sources: town's new name revealed

Goodbye, Asbestos, hello, Val-des-Sources: town's new name revealed

AdvertisementMONTREAL --The Quebec town synonymous with the cancer-causing fibre asbestos has voted for a new name: Val-des-Sources.Mayor Hugues Grimard said Monday night during a live-streamed council meeting that Val-des-Sources won with 51.5 per cent of the vote after three rounds.Asbestos residents over the age of 14 and local property owners were eligible to cast their votes for the new name of the town, located about 130 km east of Montreal.The name Val-des-Sources was officially adopted by council and Grimard said it will be proposed to the provincial government for approval.Asbestos...

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The Canadian Press
Oct 19
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N.S. calls on Ottawa to define a 'moderate livelihood,' as fishing dispute boils over

N.S. calls on Ottawa to define a 'moderate livelihood,' as fishing dispute boils over

AdvertisementHALIFAX --Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil is urging Ottawa to define what constitutes legal harvesting in a "moderate livelihood" fishery, after a dispute about Indigenous fishing treaty rights boiled over on the weekend.In a statement Saturday on Twitter, McNeil said the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans needs to answer the question of what a moderate livelihood looks like before the province can examine its own rules for fish buyers.He said Nova Scotia's regulations rely on the federal department's "authority and responsibility to manage the fishery and identify...

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The Canadian Press
Oct 18
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