Theresa Machemer
Theresa Machemer
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Heat in Jupiter’s Moon Europa Might Have Made Its Oceans Habitable

Heat in Jupiter’s Moon Europa Might Have Made Its Oceans Habitable

Europa is Jupiter’s sixth-largest moon, but it's smaller than Earth’s moon and hosts an ocean that may be twice the volume of Earth’s own. Now, presented at the suggests that, based on how the Jovial moon’s ocean formed, Europa may have been capable of supporting life.Researchers at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a new computer model to demonstrate how radioactive heating inside of Europa could have caused the ocean to form, Will Dunham reports for . The ocean—positioned above the moon's layered interior—is blanketed with ice about sits on top of the ocean.The computer...

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Theresa Machemer
6d ago
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Cold-Blooded, but Not Cold-Hearted, Garter Snakes Form Friendships

Cold-Blooded, but Not Cold-Hearted, Garter Snakes Form Friendships

Garter snakes are some of the snakes in North America. As the weather warms up, they can be spotted slithering across lawns or sunning on rocks. Their range spans from Canada to Costa Rica, and new evidence suggests they don’t go it alone. Instead, garter snakes seem to form social bonds.The research, published last month in the journal , looked at the behavior of 40 garter snakes—30 of them wild-caught, 10 captive-bred. When placed in an enclosure with a limited number of hiding places, the snakes not only formed groups, but returned to the same cliques after they were scrambled around....

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Theresa Machemer
May 18
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Authorities Recover 19,000 Artifacts in International Antiquities Trafficking Sting

Authorities Recover 19,000 Artifacts in International Antiquities Trafficking Sting

A joint operation undertaken by Interpol, Europol, the World Customs Organization and local police forces has recovered 19,000 artifacts from 103 countries, the this week. Objects recovered range from a pre-Hispanic gold mask to a trove of ancient coins and Roman figurines. Authorities arrested 101 people as part of the crackdown.The undercover operations, dubbed Athena II and Pandora IV, took place last fall. Due to “operational reasons” cited in the statement, the missions’ results were withheld until now.Pandora IV is the latest in a series of similarly titled stings. Per the ’s Kabir...

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Theresa Machemer
May 8
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Celebrate Mother's Day With Nine Baby Animal Livestreams

Celebrate Mother's Day With Nine Baby Animal Livestreams

Spring is just about in full swing in the northern hemisphere. Snow has melted, and bears have begun from hibernation with their cubs. Among the flowers blooming in your backyard, you might find a . (Don’t panic and don’t move them—in three weeks, they’ll be grown up and hop out of your hair.)These baby animals and more are starting to scamper around—just in time for Mother's Day. Enjoy these live cams of busy animal mamas and their young ones to help celebrate motherhood all across the animal kingdom.The puppies shown on Warrior Canine Connection’s “” are hard at work, even when napping in...

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Theresa Machemer
May 8
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The Forces Behind Venus’ Super-Rotating Atmosphere

The Forces Behind Venus’ Super-Rotating Atmosphere

is Earth’s sister planet, similar in size and history, and our closest planetary neighbor in the solar system. It’s also like an evil twin, with a surface hot enough to melt lead covered with thick, sulfuric acid clouds. Venus spins on its axis in the as most planets in the solar system, and it takes its time to rotate—one Venusian day lasts 243 Earth days.That is, if you’re measuring the planet’s rocky surface. Its atmosphere, however, moves about 60 times faster. Powered by constant, hurricane-force winds, Venus’ clouds can lap the planet in just four Earth days. This odd phenomenon is...

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Theresa Machemer
Apr 28
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On May 27, Astronauts Will Launch From U.S. Soil for the First Time in Nine Years

On May 27, Astronauts Will Launch From U.S. Soil for the First Time in Nine Years

The last space shuttle flight launched on July 8, 2011, from Kennedy Space Center’s Launchpad 39A. Since the shuttle’s return to Earth 11 days later, NASA astronauts have flown to the International Space Station on Soyuz rockets, managed by Russia. On Friday, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine that on May 27, astronauts will lift off from United States soil for the first time in almost nine years.Two NASA astronauts, Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley, will fly on the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft, set to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket at 4:32 P.M that day. After about 24 hours, the Crew Dragon...

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Theresa Machemer
Apr 21
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New Tool for Biomedical Research Was Invented in Ancient Egypt

New Tool for Biomedical Research Was Invented in Ancient Egypt

Thousands of years ago, a bright blue pigment the walls of tombs, ceramic figurines, and the crown of the Bust of Nefertiti. This colorful chemical, calcium copper silicate, was invented in ancient Egypt and still fascinates researchers today.A new study published last month in details how nanoscale sheets of the pigment, also called Egyptian blue, can be used in biology research. Through a series of steps, powdered Egyptian blue pigment can be flaked apart into mineral sheets 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, according to a . Then, when inserted into biological samples, it can...

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Theresa Machemer
Apr 1
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Pluto Has a Nitrogen Heartbeat

Pluto Has a Nitrogen Heartbeat

Pluto has a heartbeat of sorts, according to a new study from NASA’s team.Each day, sunlight hits the Sputnik Planitia basin—the left side of the heart—and nitrogen ice vaporizes. At night, Pluto’s temperature drops, and the vaporized nitrogen condenses back to ice. The cycle repeats every Plutonian day, which is about , and powers the winds that shaped the dwarf planet’s landscape, per the study published on February 4 in the ."Before New Horizons, everyone thought Pluto was going to be a netball—completely flat, almost no diversity," NASA astrophysicist and planetary scientist Tanguy...

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Theresa Machemer
Feb 11
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