Yuval Levin
Yuval Levin
Yuval Levin is the director of social, cultural, and constitutional studies at the American Enterprise Institute and the editor of National Affairs.Source
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Freedom for What? | National Review

Freedom for What? | National Review

The Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments today in AFPF v. Rodriquez. It’s a case arising from the state of California’s requirement that non-profit organizations disclose their donors to state officials. The state finds itself opposed (as litigants or amici) by a staggeringly diverse array of non-profits — from libertarians to progressives, from pro-life groups to NARAL, from CAIR to the Human Rights Campaign. But as William Haun and Daniel Chen , the case raises questions that run well beyond the importance of anonymity to the very nature of what has come to be called the freedom of...

Apr 26
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Biden’s First Cabinet Confirmation Snags | National Review

Biden’s First Cabinet Confirmation Snags | National Review

Generally speaking, the Senate should be willing to give the president the cabinet he wants. But that doesn’t mean that the Constitution’s assignment of a power to advise and consent on key appointments should be treated as a mere formality. Some presidential appointees are just bad choices that the Senate should reject, and deciding where to draw that line is a matter of judgment that should reach beyond simple partisan loyalties.Senators have usually been pretty good about finding a reasonable balance on this front. Most cabinet nominations get confirmed, and many are confirmed with...

Feb 22
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Sharing the Senate | National Review

Sharing the Senate | National Review

Once the two Democratic winners of Georgia’s Senate runoff races are sworn in, around January 20, the two parties will each hold 50 seats in the Senate. On the face of it, that means the Democrats will control the chamber, since the Constitution gives the vice president a vote on the floor when the Senate is equally divided. But as a practical matter, it may well mean something more like shared control of the Senate in some key respects, and exactly what that will look like will need to be worked out in short order.The Democrats can’t really count on …‘What’s the point of hiding from...

Jan 16
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Failures of Leadership in a Populist Age | National Review

Failures of Leadership in a Populist Age | National Review

For many years now, an important segment of the Republican electorate has been increasingly frustrated with the elites who lead our core institutions. The political outlook of these voters has come to be defined by that frustration — a sense that people with power and privilege in American life routinely abuse that power and privilege for personal gain and ideological advantage, that they lie to the public, look down on everybody else’s ways of life, and actively threaten the religious and cultural foundations of American society. Calling out that elite corruption and fighting back against...

Jan 4
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Our Two Minority Parties | National Review

Our Two Minority Parties | National Review

As the results of the election come gradually into sharper focus, both parties have good reason to be frustrated. Both have been rebuked in some important respects by the electorate. And both rebukes are justified. If the parties are willing to learn from them, the result might be good for our politics.In a sense, the election epitomizes our era of negative partisanship. Each party ran primarily by highlighting the danger of the other, and the public took both warnings to heart. The Democrats ran against Donald Trump, and look to have persuaded the electorate to dismiss him. The Republicans...

Nov 6
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Happy Constitution Day | National Review

Happy Constitution Day | National Review

On this date 233 years ago—September 17, 1787—the Constitution was signed by its authors, and began its challenging journey toward ratification. We are very fortunate that it succeeded on that journey. Our country has not only benefited from the wisdom underlying that document but has also been shaped by its forms and contours. We Americans identify ourselves with the structure of our government to a very unusual degree, and for that reason many of our most profound debates and disagreements take the form of constitutional arguments.This year, in particular, we might want to cherish and...

September 17, 2020
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How to Get the Pandemic Bill Negotiations Unstuck | National Review

How to Get the Pandemic Bill Negotiations Unstuck | National Review

Cross-partisan talks about another pandemic-relief bill are clearly bogged down. But the rhetoric, and even a lot of the journalism, around how that has happened tends to mask more than it reveals.Republicans say the Democrats are clinging to unreasonable demands and irresponsible spending levels. Democrats say Republicans don’t want a bill and aren’t prioritizing real needs. And the headlines in recent days have been filled with disgust at the decision of both houses (and so both parties) to leave town until after Labor Day without resolving the fate of unemployment benefits,...

August 14, 2020
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The Return of Pen-and-Phone Constitutionalism

The Return of Pen-and-Phone Constitutionalism

Saturday, President Trump put his name to four executive actions — three presidential memoranda and one executive order — intended to offer some relief to Americans dealing with the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. The premise of these actions, made explicit in the text of each, was that Congress had failed to act and now the chief executive has to step in. It is a premise fundamentally at odds with the logic of our constitutional order, and it points to a number of dangerous dysfunctions in the American system of government that are now thoroughly bipartisan. As a matter of...

August 9, 2020
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A Study in Self-Pity | National Review

A Study in Self-Pity | National Review

Chris Wallace’s , which aired on Sunday, is well worth watching if you’ve got a strong stomach.The parts about the pandemic are as terrifying as you’ve heard—a veritable catalog of unfitness, incompetence, and willful ignorance that will leave you grateful for America’s system of federalism.But I actually thought the most interesting and telling bit of the interview was at the very end, and wasn’t about the virus. Here’s the final question and answer:WALLACE: Whether it’s in 2021 or 2025, how will you regard your years as President of the United States?TRUMP: I think I was very unfairly...

July 20, 2020
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