arstechnica.com
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Ars Technica is a website covering news and opinions in technology, science, politics, and society, created by Ken Fisher and Jon Stokes in 1998. It publishes news, reviews, and guides on issues such as computer hardware and software, science, technology policy, and video games. Many of the site's writers are postgraduates and some work for research institutions. Articles on the website are written in a less-formal tone than those in traditional journals. Ars Technica was privately owned until May 2008, when it was sold to Condé Nast Digital, the online division of Condé Nast Publications.Source
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Target of first human gene editing cuts life expectancy short

Target of first human gene editing cuts life expectancy short

Late last year, a Chinese researcher shocked the scientific community when he announced that the first gene-edited humans had already been born. He Jiankui barreled past that the technology and, once it was, should be reserved for otherwise untreatable diseases. Instead of respecting those boundaries, He did much of his work without any clear institutional oversight.Rather than target an incurable genetic disorder, He Jiankui focused on something for which we have both preventative measures and treatments: HIV infection. He did so by using CRISPR gene editing to damage a gene that encodes a...

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John Timmer
Jun 5, 2019
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Coinbase doubles down on anti-politics stance with exit package offer

Coinbase doubles down on anti-politics stance with exit package offer

In the last few years, big technology companies have faced growing pressure from employees to become involved in social justice issues. This pressure intensified this summer with the George Floyd protests. But this week, CEO Brian Armstrong of the cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase staked out a contrarian stance. "While I think these efforts are well-intentioned, they have the potential to destroy a lot of value at most companies, both by being a distraction, and by creating internal division,"  in a blog post. "We've seen what internal strife at companies like Google and Facebook can do to...

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Timothy B. Lee
Sep 30
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Disney+ will be a true Netflix competitor, with non-Disney shows streaming, too

Disney+ will be a true Netflix competitor, with non-Disney shows streaming, too

The more we learn about Disney's new streaming TV and movie service, the more ambitious it sounds. Disney CEO Bob Iger told investors on the company's quarterly that the service (called Disney+) will host TV shows and movies licensed from other parties in addition to content being made in-house by Disney properties like Lucasfilm and Marvel Studios.Iger hedged a little in terms of long-term plans, though, saying that the larger strategy is focused on producing original content but that third-party content will be part of the launch strategy later this year. He said that the long-term...

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Samuel Axon
Feb 8, 2019
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“Catastrophic” hack on email provider destroys almost two decades of data

“Catastrophic” hack on email provider destroys almost two decades of data

Email provider VFEmail said it has suffered a catastrophic destruction of all of its servers by an unknown assailant who wiped out almost two decades' worth of data and backups in a matter of hours.“Yes, @VFEmail is effectively gone,” VFEmail founder Rick Romero Tuesday morning after watching someone methodically reformat hard drives of the service he started in 2001. “It will likely not return. I never thought anyone would care about my labor of love so much that they'd want to completely and thoroughly destroy it.”Yes, is effectively gone. It will likely not return.I never thought anyone...

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Dan Goodin
Feb 13, 2019
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Google’s Waymo risks repeating Silicon Valley’s most famous blunder

Google’s Waymo risks repeating Silicon Valley’s most famous blunder

Everyone in Silicon Valley knows the story of Xerox inventing the modern personal computer in the 1970s and then failing to commercialize it effectively. Yet one of Silicon Valley's most successful companies, Google's Alphabet, appears to be repeating Xerox's mistake with its self-driving car program.Xerox launched its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) in 1970. By 1975, its researchers had invented a personal computer with a graphical user interface that was almost a decade ahead of its time. Unfortunately, the commercial version of this technology wasn't released until 1981 and proved to be...

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Timothy B. Lee
Feb 16, 2019
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Facebook may face multi-billion dollar fine for Cambridge Analytica scandal

Facebook may face multi-billion dollar fine for Cambridge Analytica scandal

Facebook may have to pay a multi-billion dollar fine for violating its users' privacy—or face a lawsuit from the Federal Trade Commission.The FTC has been investigating Facebook and is negotiating with the company "over a multi-billion dollar fine that would settle the agency's investigation," The Washington Post yesterday, citing "people familiar with the probe." New York Times sources also that the current negotiations "could amount to a record, multibillion-dollar fine."The investigation focuses on whether Facebook violated the terms of a with the FTC. In the 2011 case, the FTC that...

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Jon Brodkin
Feb 16, 2019
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Deadly Superbug Outbreak in Humans Linked to Antibiotic Spike in Cows

Deadly Superbug Outbreak in Humans Linked to Antibiotic Spike in Cows

A deadly outbreak of multi-drug resistant Salmonella that sickened 225 people across the US beginning in 2018 may have been spurred by a sharp rise in the use of certain antibiotics in cows a year earlier, infectious disease investigators reported this week. From June 2018 to March of 2019, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport. The strain was resistant to several antibiotics, most notably azithromycin—a recommended treatment for Salmonella enterica infections. Before the outbreak, azithromycin-resistance...

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Beth Mole
Aug 25, 2019
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AT&T sued by Sprint, must defend decision to tell users that 4G is “5G E”

AT&T sued by Sprint, must defend decision to tell users that 4G is “5G E”

Sprint is suing AT&T, alleging that AT&T's misleading "5G E" advertising campaign violates laws prohibiting false advertising and deceptive acts and practices.AT&T renamed a large portion of its 4G network, calling it "5G E," for "5G Evolution." But as , what AT&T calls 5G E consists of technologies that are part of the years-old 4G LTE-Advanced standard and are already used by Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint on their 4G networks. Despite that, AT&T has been advertising this supposed upgrade to 5G E and even on smartphones from 4G to 5G E."By making the false claim that it is offering a 5G...

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Jon Brodkin
Feb 11, 2019
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AT&T raises DirecTV prices again despite losing millions of customers

AT&T raises DirecTV prices again despite losing millions of customers

AT&T announced another round of DirecTV and U-verse TV price increases, saying that monthly rates will rise by up to $8 per month starting on January 19. "Because our programming costs went up, we have to raise our monthly prices for select packages," AT&T said in a notice titled "." An additional $2 increase on the Regional Sports Network fee means that some customers will pay another $10 per month.The $8-per-month increase will apply to the DirecTV Premier plan that costs $189. A $7 increase will apply to the Ultimate package that costs $135 and to the Xtra package that costs $124; a $5...

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Jon Brodkin
Dec 12, 2019
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Apple pushes fix for “FacePalm,” possibly its creepiest vulnerability ever

Apple pushes fix for “FacePalm,” possibly its creepiest vulnerability ever

Apple has patched one of its creepiest vulnerabilities ever—a flaw in its FaceTime messenger app that made it possible for people to .The bug in Group FaceTime, a feature that allows conference-call-style chats, made it trivial for someone to eavesdrop on someone else simply by initiating a FaceTime call, swiping up and choosing “add person,” and entering their own number to add themselves as a participant in a Group FaceTime call. While people on the receiving end would see a call was coming through, they would have no idea that the person trying to connect could already hear nearby audio...

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Dan Goodin
Feb 8, 2019
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