citylab.com
citylab.com
CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
4 reviews
USER
img-trusted
100%
19 reviews
RECENT ARTICLES
gold-cheese100%
In New York City, Density Saves Lives, Too

In New York City, Density Saves Lives, Too

This is part of an ongoing CityLab series on the debate over urban density during the coronavirus crisis. For more, go .New York’s coronavirus death toll is rawly staggering — as of are believed to have died from Covid-19-related reasons, magnitudes more than the 2,747 souls lost on 9/11. It’s easy, superficially, to blame the city’s density, and : Surely, so many people living, working, and traveling in close quarters caused Covid-19 to spread more easily. We don’t know that yet. But what we do know is that for the three decades leading up to this pandemic, New York ably used its density...

citylab.com
Nicole Gelinas
1d ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
How to Discover the History of Your Neighborhood, Without Leaving Home

How to Discover the History of Your Neighborhood, Without Leaving Home

A friend of mine once told me life is short, but it is wide. I’ve been thinking about that lately, less in terms of life, but in terms of space. Most of us aren’t going anywhere these days. Our circles are smaller, our paths closer to home. Space is short. But there’s a different way to go wide when you can’t go far, and that’s to go back.Related links:Public Library Collections:Newspaper Archives:State Historical Societies:City Archives:Online Neighborhood Groups:Postcards on eBay:(or they have a ),Expand Comments + The hyper-local social media platform Nextdoor is winning over local law...

citylab.com
Ariel Aberg
4d ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
How Nextdoor Courts Police and Public Officials

How Nextdoor Courts Police and Public Officials

Charles Husted, the chief of police in Sedona, Arizona, couldn’t contain his excitement. He had just been accepted into the Public Agencies Advisory Council for , the neighborhood social networking app.“You’re the best!!! A great Christmas present,” he wrote in a December email to Parisa Safarzadeh, Government Relations Manager for Nextdoor.com Inc., obtained by CityLab through a public records request.As part of the chosen group, he would be flown to San Francisco on President’s Day, along with seven other community engagement staffers from police departments and city offices across the...

citylab.com
Sarah Holder
4d ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
What Reopening Georgia Might Really Be About

What Reopening Georgia Might Really Be About

During the last week in March, Georgia processed more claims for unemployment insurance than the state did in all of 2019. In the span of seven days, workers made 390,000 new jobless claims, and the Georgia Department of Labor says the state issued nearly $42 million in unemployment benefits.Then the full force of coronavirus closures struck state coffers. Over the course of about three weeks in April, Georgia has paid out some $600 million in unemployment claims, according to the . The state has processed more than 1 million jobless claims, blowing past records set during the Great...

citylab.com
Kriston Capps
Apr 26
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
How Coronavirus Is Killing Off Ballot Measures

How Coronavirus Is Killing Off Ballot Measures

Right now, Melissa Lavasani expected to be going door-to-door collecting signatures for Decriminalize Nature D.C., the campaign to stop arrests for the possession or growing of psychedelic plants that she launched in the District last December. She needs to gather at least 35,000 signatures by July 6 to get the measure onto D.C.’s ballot for the November election.But with the city under a , her campaign’s on hold. Lavasani fears that without the ability to do field work, Decriminalize Nature’s 2020 campaign will fail to qualify — a looming worry shared by proponents of ballot measures,...

citylab.com
Sarah Holder
Apr 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Forget the Open Concept: It's Time to Bring Back Rooms

Forget the Open Concept: It's Time to Bring Back Rooms

If someone asked me five years ago whether or not I thought the open floor plan would still be popular, I would have said no. Domestic architecture seemed to be taking a turn toward the rustic. Today, “Farmhouse” and “Craftsman” modern designs, harkening back to the American vernacular tradition (complete with shiplap walls), are a tour-de-force.But I would have been wrong. Although these houses bring all the exterior trappings of beloved vernacular houses of the past, they do not extend that to the interior plans. In fact, the open concepts from the oversized houses of the pre-recession...

citylab.com
Kate Wagner
Apr 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Privatize the Post Office? Here's Another Idea

Privatize the Post Office? Here's Another Idea

At this very moment, U.S. Postal Service carriers are delivering masks and respirators to the front lines in the battle against the coronavirus pandemic. They are moving test kits to labs and prescription medication to seniors. Mail carriers are handing off safe ballots for upcoming elections in , , , and other states. Postal workers are ferrying millions of notices and questionnaires for the 2020 census count, an urgent yet thankless task assigned to the Postal Service. And as soon as the president gets around to attaching his John Hancock to , the Postal Service will deliver tens of...

citylab.com
Kriston Capps
Apr 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Are Suburbs Safer From Coronavirus? Probably Not.

Are Suburbs Safer From Coronavirus? Probably Not.

Alexis Kaiser always planned on renting out the house that came with the 250-acre Oklahoma farm that she and her husband bought in 2015. Her sister thought the idea would never work — 65 miles from the nearest airport, the three-bedroom split-level house seemed too remote.But the listing fared well on Airbnb. Now Kaiser is tapping into a new strain of social anxiety in order to hit it bigger. As cases of a respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus spread throughout the U.S., Kaiser is advertising her abode as a “Covid-19 Safe House” on Craigslist in cities with large infection...

citylab.com
Laura Bliss
Apr 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Nebraska’s Battle Over Single-Family Homes Is Not Much of a Battle

Nebraska’s Battle Over Single-Family Homes Is Not Much of a Battle

On February 4, the battle over single-family homes came to Nebraska. A state legislative committee heard arguments about a number of bills designed to lower housing costs by lifting local bans on duplex homes, triplexes, townhouses and other options in cities across the state.This push looks similar to both the that in January, and , which has been defeated several times in Sacramento. Officials in , , and other states are currently weighing similar zoning reforms. The efforts thus far have tended to trigger pitched battles between affordability advocates and status-quo-defenders over the...

citylab.com
Kriston Capps
Apr 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
The New Geography of American Immigration

The New Geography of American Immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigration is having its effect, but in unexpected ways. Overall, immigration to the U.S. has slowed dramatically, because it has declined in coastal states. However, perhaps ironically, it is Trump-voting states and metropolitan areas that have registered the largest gains in immigrants.Those are some of the key takeaways from a of American Community Survey data by Brookings Institution demographer William Frey, a leading expert in the geography of immigration.America’s foreign-born population grew by slightly more than 200,000 people in 2017-18, the...

citylab.com
Richard Florida
Mar 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
The Doomed 1970s Plan to Desegregate New York's Suburbs

The Doomed 1970s Plan to Desegregate New York's Suburbs

Edward J. Logue (1921-2000) was a city administrator who led major urban-renewal projects on the East Coast from the 1950s into the 1980s, combining Robert Moses-like ambition with a deep commitment to progressive New Deal values. He oversaw the postwar redevelopment of New Haven’s ailing downtown and then moved on to Boston, where he built Government Center in what had been Scollay Square, and conceived the restoration of Fanueil Hall-Quincy Market.From 1968 to 1975, Logue led the New York State Urban Development Corporation, which was endowed with strong powers such as the ability to...

citylab.com
Lizabeth Cohen
Mar 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Several Years In, Is Vision Zero Actually Working?

Several Years In, Is Vision Zero Actually Working?

In 2012, Chicago ventured where no other big U.S. city had. Under then-Mayor Rahm Emanuel, the city set a mission of eliminating traffic fatalities and injuries in 10 years. The city didn’t mention “Vision Zero” by name, but its ambitious goal took inspiration from that road safety policy platform enacted 15 years prior in Sweden, leading to one of the lowest national traffic mortality rates in the world.The basic logic of Vision Zero is that any traffic collision that results in death or serious injury—whether for a pedestrian, cyclist, motorist, or any other road user—isn’t an unavoidable...

citylab.com
Laura Bliss
Mar 13
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Airlines Are Flying Empty ‘Ghost Flights’ Amid Coronavirus Fears

Airlines Are Flying Empty ‘Ghost Flights’ Amid Coronavirus Fears

As coronavirus infections rise around the globe, demand for air travel is projected to hits its lowest point since the last financial crisis. Airlines around the world could lose up to $113 billion in revenue this year if COVID-19 continues to spread, the International Air Transport Association forecast on Thursday.With travelers scarce, some carriers are turning to a troubling practice, the : flying planes with no passengers, in order to hang on to take-off and landing slots. On Thursday, the U.K.’s Secretary of State for Transport, Grant Shapps, posted a letter he sent to air travel...

citylab.com
Laura Bliss
Mar 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
It's Time for Some Cheap and Boring Transportation Solutions

It's Time for Some Cheap and Boring Transportation Solutions

There’s a tension in transportation news. On one hand, cities are eager to nudge residents away from automobiles and toward modes that pose less danger, both to people and the planet. But the mobility stories that grab media attention often involve launching buzzy plans for , , , and startups — innovations that have yet to prove they can reduce driving. As , city officials touting these tech launches are often motivated more by FOMO than by a strategy to catalyze mode shift.But local leaders have a choice. Rather than racing to be the first to deploy some new technology, they can instead...

citylab.com
David Zipper
Mar 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
How to Make a Housing Crisis

How to Make a Housing Crisis

For most of American history, cities grew along a familiar pattern. Once a suburban community grew large enough, the neighboring big city would loosen its borders and swallow it up through annexation. Then in the 1950s, the developers of Lakewood, California—sometimes described as the “Levittown of the West Coast”—invented a new “municipal technology” to avoid this fate.By contracting out vital municipal services like police, fire and sanitation to the county or private entities, the 17,500-home subdivision just outside of Long Beach was able to incorporate as a city at a significantly...

citylab.com
Benjamin Schneider
Mar 2
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
What Happened When Tulsa Paid People to Work Remotely

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People to Work Remotely

TULSA, OK — Obum Ukabam sits suctioned to his laptop in the middle of an open-plan coworking space, quietly typing. With its vaulted ceilings, rows of elbow-to-elbow workbenches and a Spotify-Chill playlist, the office exudes a vibe you might find in many a major U.S. city. And Ukabam could do his job from any of them.This particular office, though, happens to be in Tulsa, Oklahoma. That’s where Ukabam and his wife moved last spring, sight unseen, after 10 years in Southern California.The transition wasn’t made on a whim. Ukabam is a member of the first inaugural class of Tulsa Remote, an...

citylab.com
Sarah Holder
Mar 2
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

MASDAR CITY, United Arab Emirates—The driverless electric vehicle that travels the streets of this pilot eco-city is royal blue and vaguely resembles a vintage VW microbus. It glides along at a cautionary speed for three blocks, then reverses direction to do it again, beeping like a microwave oven all the while. One of the many cats roaming the complex watches indifferently.It’s a lonely exercise, as the streets of Masdar City seem to be occupied mostly by tour groups coming to check out the master-planned clean-tech hub near Abu Dhabi’s international airport. A little more than 10 years...

citylab.com
Anthony Flint
Mar 2
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
What Mike Bloomberg Got Wrong About Redlining and the Financial Crisis

What Mike Bloomberg Got Wrong About Redlining and the Financial Crisis

At a Georgetown University forum in September 2008, then-New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg was asked about the major economic story of the day: the roots of the exploding global financial crisis. This was the month that Lehman Brothers had filed for bankruptcy and the federal government had placed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac into conservatorship. What was behind the bust?Bloomberg’s answer: The implosion of the nation’s housing market was the result of the prohibition of redlining, the discriminatory practice by which lenders denied African-American homebuyers access to loans in the same...

citylab.com
Kriston Capps
Feb 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Why Amsterdam’s Canal Houses Have Endured for 300 Years

Why Amsterdam’s Canal Houses Have Endured for 300 Years

A different kind of wealth distribution in 17th-century Amsterdam paved the way for its quintessential home design. Amsterdam’s canal houses may be beautiful, but we shouldn’t assume that they were always sites of a leisured, easy life. Look closely at the appearance and layout of these skinny, extremely photogenic buildings, laid out across the city’s canal belt during the Dutch Republic’s 17th century peak, and there are telltale signs that they were built not solely for living: Cranes projecting from their gables; deep, murky plots; and internal staircases almost as steep as ladders....

citylab.com
Feargus O'Sullivan
Jan 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
America After Climate Change, Mapped

America After Climate Change, Mapped

In 100 years, what will a United States transformed by climate change look like? At this point, you don’t have to use much imagination to predict what’s coming: Temperatures will continue to climb; sea levels will continue to rise. And, by the 2060s, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that global migration patterns will bring 100 million new people into the country, who will settle from coast to coast. Almost everything else about the climate of tomorrow and the nation’s ability to survive it is less inevitable, however, says Billy Fleming, the director of the University of Pennsylvania’s...

citylab.com
Sarah Holder
Dec 29
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
In Japan’s Vanishing Rural Towns, Newcomers Are Wanted

In Japan’s Vanishing Rural Towns, Newcomers Are Wanted

Facing declining birthrates and rural depopulation, hundreds of “marginal villages” could vanish in a few decades. But some small towns are fighting back. On a recent afternoon in the rural Japanese town of Kanna-machi, all seemed well. Children splashed in the town’s namesake river; their parents relaxed nearby at a bankside summer beer garden. A gaggle of laughing teenagers in muddy uniforms strolled home along the town’s main road after an afternoon baseball practice. Set against lush mountain views, life here seems idyllic. But Kanna-machi, deep in Japan’s central Gunma Prefecture, is...

citylab.com
Allan Richarz
Nov 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
The Disappearing Hospitals of Rural America

The Disappearing Hospitals of Rural America

Presidential candidates and other politicians have talked about the rural health crisis in the U.S., but they are not telling rural Americans anything new. Rural Americans know all too well what it feels like to have no hospital and emergency care when they break a leg, go into early labor, or have progressive chronic diseases, such as diabetes and congestive heart failure. More than 20 percent of our nation’s rural hospitals, or 430 hospitals across 43 states, are near collapse. This is despite the fact that rural hospitals are not only crucial for health care but also for the survival of...

citylab.com
Jane Bolin
+1
Oct 2
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
Why Calling the Police About Homeless People Isn’t Working

Why Calling the Police About Homeless People Isn’t Working

Donald Trump announced he’d take in California this month, vowing to clear San Francisco’s “filthy” streets, and potentially rehouse Los Angeles’ Skid Row residents in a government-run detention center. It seems he's taking steps to follow through: that the federal government has discussed leasing a building just outside Los Angeles to use as a homeless facility, and Department of Housing and Urban Development secretary Ben Carson last week. Trump’s attention brings with it the specter of federal law enforcement, and his remarks have received the condemnation of liberal city leaders. But as...

citylab.com
Sarah Holder
Sep 25
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese100%
I Collect Rat DNA to Figure Out How Rodents Move Through Cities

I Collect Rat DNA to Figure Out How Rodents Move Through Cities

It’s dark and I’m parked in an alley near a lopsided compost bin. I have a notepad, binoculars and a lukewarm cup of coffee—everything needed for a successful stakeout. I am waiting for them. They appear approximately one hour before dawn, skittering from dumpster to dumpster along old paths they have worn down with time. I am trying to track their movements, to understand how far they go and how often. But it’s clear to me that the traditional detective approach isn’t going to work. There are too many and they move in places where I can’t follow. I’ll have to track them a different...

citylab.com
Kaylee Byers
Aug 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese50%
The New Servant Class

The New Servant Class

In an age of persistently high inequality, work in high-cost metros catering to the whims of the wealthy—grooming them, stretching them, feeding them, driving them—has become one of the fastest-growing industries. The MIT economist David Autor calls it “wealth work.” Low-skill, low-pay, and disproportionately done by women, these jobs congregate near dense urban labor markets, multiplying in neighborhoods with soaring disposable income. Between 2010 and 2017, the number of manicurists and pedicurists doubled, while the number of fitness trainers and skincare specialists grew at least...

citylab.com
Derek Thompson
Aug 13
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
AUTHORS
Jane Bolin

Jane Bolin

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Laura Bliss

Laura Bliss

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Anthony Flint

Anthony Flint

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Claire Tran

Claire Tran

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Allan Richarz

Allan Richarz

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Lizabeth Cohen

Lizabeth Cohen

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Nancy Dickey

Nancy Dickey

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
David Zipper

David Zipper

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Nicole Gelinas

Nicole Gelinas

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Benjamin Schneider

Benjamin Schneider

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Kaylee Byers

Kaylee Byers

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Ariel Aberg

Ariel Aberg

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Feargus O'Sullivan

Feargus O'Sullivan

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Bree Watzak

Bree Watzak

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Sarah Holder

Sarah Holder

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
img-trusted
100%
Derek Thompson

Derek Thompson

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
img-contested
50%
Kate Wagner

Kate Wagner

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating
Richard Florida

Richard Florida

CRITIC
N/A
No Rating
USER
N/A
No Rating