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Tackling food allergies at the source

Tackling food allergies at the source

Food allergies are a big problem. About 7% of children and 2% of adults in the U.S. suffer from some kind of food allergy. These allergies cost a whopping $25 billion in health care each year. Then there's the time lost at school or work. And there's the risk of serious complications, even death.It's critical to find ways to reduce the suffering caused by food allergies. Food processing companies already spend a lot of effort to label products so people can avoid items they're allergic to. But what if we could do better? What if we could enjoy the foods we like without worrying they might...

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Asa Cssa Sssa
6d ago
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Simple, no-cost ways to help the public care for the commons

Simple, no-cost ways to help the public care for the commons

Researchers from University of Wisconsin-Madison, New York Institute of Technology, University of Iowa, and Cornell University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines whether it is possible to make people feel as if the property is theirs--a feeling known as psychological ownership--and how this affects their stewardship behaviors.The study, forthcoming in the Journal of Marketing, is titled "Caring for the Commons: Using Psychological Ownership to Enhance Stewardship Behavior for Public Goods" and is authored by Joann Peck, Colleen Kirk, Andrea Luangrath, and...

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AMA_Marketing
4d ago
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Gut microbiome link to deadly lung disease

Gut microbiome link to deadly lung disease

Research led by the Centenary Institute, the University of Technology Sydney and the University of Queensland has shown for the first time a link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an often fatal lung condition, and the gut microbiome.The findings, published in the high impact science journal 'Nature Communications', suggests that the gut may be helpful in diagnosing COPD and may also be a potential source of new therapeutic targets to help treat the chronic respiratory disorder."It's already known that the lung microbiome is a contributing factor in COPD," said Professor...

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centenaryinst
5d ago
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First US nationwide estimates of sexual minority representation in STEM fields

First US nationwide estimates of sexual minority representation in STEM fields

One of the first nationwide estimates of sexual minority representation across Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) degrees and occupations in the US publishes November 18, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dario Sansone from the University of Exeter, UK, and Christopher S. Carpenter from Vanderbilt University, USA.A body of research has documented wide gaps in STEM degrees and occupations based on gender and race/ethnicity; however, relatively few studies have examined the impact of sexual orientation on STEM representation, due in part to a lack of data. This...

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6d ago
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Does air pollution affect mental health later in life?

Does air pollution affect mental health later in life?

In a study of women aged 80 years and older, living in locations with higher exposures to air pollution was associated with increased depressive symptoms. The findings are published in the .When looking at individual air pollutants, a team led by investigators from of the University of Southern California found that long-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide or fine particulate air pollution was associated with increased depressive symptoms, but with only a small effect. Results also suggested that depressive symptoms might play a role in linking long-term air pollution exposure to memory...

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6d ago
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Researchers create first map of bee species around the globe

Researchers create first map of bee species around the globe

There are over 20,000 species of bee, but accurate data about how these species are spread across the globe are sparse. However, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on November 19 have created a map of bee diversity by combining the most complete global checklist of known bee species with the almost 6 million additional public records of where individual species have appeared around the world. The team's findings support that there are more species of bees in the Northern Hemisphere than the Southern and more in arid and temperate environments than in the tropics."People...

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5d ago
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Antibiotic exposure in children under age 2 associated with chronic conditions

Antibiotic exposure in children under age 2 associated with chronic conditions

Children under age 2 who take antibiotics are at greater risk for childhood-onset asthma, respiratory allergies, eczema, celiac disease, obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a paper written jointly by Mayo Clinic and Rutgers researchers.In a study published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the researchers looked at 14,572 children born in Olmsted County, Minn., between 2003 and 2011, 70 percent of whom received at least one antibiotic prescription during their first two years, primarily for respiratory or ear infections.The findings are consistent with...

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RutgersU
Nov 16
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Identification of the SARS-CoV-2 virus features causing COVID-19 using primate model

Identification of the SARS-CoV-2 virus features causing COVID-19 using primate model

Features of the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19, which could be useful for developing vaccines and treatment strategies, were identified using a nonhuman primate model developed at the .The work was initiated in February this year by the research team led by Dr. Jung Joo Hong at the KRIBB National Primate Research Center, and resulted in successful development of a nonhuman primate model of COVID-19 infection, the fourth model reported worldwide, following China, the Netherlands, and the US. The results of the study were part of a larger research project aiming to identify key features of...

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Nov 15
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Financial penalties imposed on large pharmaceutical firms for illegal activities

Financial penalties imposed on large pharmaceutical firms for illegal activities

Some pharmaceutical companies have received criticism for engaging in illegal activities, such as providing kickbacks and bribes, knowingly shipping adulterated or contaminated drugs to pharmacies, and marketing drugs for unapproved uses. This study examined financial penalties for illegal activities among large pharmaceutical firms in relation to annual revenues.MethodsWe collected data on financial penalties for pharmaceutical firms listed on the Global 500 or Fortune 1000 lists using procedures similar to Almashat et al.1 Consistent with prior research,2 we analyzed all firms that met...

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unccresearch
7d ago
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Bursts of exercise can lead to significant improvements in indicators of metabolic health

Bursts of exercise can lead to significant improvements in indicators of metabolic health

BOSTON - Short bursts of physical exercise induce changes in the body's levels of metabolites that correlate to, and may help gauge, an individual's cardiometabolic, cardiovascular and long-term health, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found. In a paper published in , the research team describes how approximately 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise impacted more than 80% of circulating metabolites, including pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes, thus identifying potential mechanisms that could contribute to a better understanding of...

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Nov 16
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Orbits of ancient stars prompt rethink on Milky Way evolution

Orbits of ancient stars prompt rethink on Milky Way evolution

Theories on how the Milky Way formed are set to be rewritten following discoveries about the behaviour of some of its oldest stars.An investigation into the orbits of the Galaxy's metal-poor stars - assumed to be among the most ancient in existence - has found that some of them travel in previously unpredicted patterns."Metal-poor stars - containing less than one-thousandth the amount of iron found in the Sun - are some of the rarest objects in the galaxy," said Professor Gary Da Costa from Australia's ARC Centre of Excellence in All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions (ASTRO 3D) and the...

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Arc Astro3 D
Nov 16
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Link between Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota is confirmed

Link between Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota is confirmed

Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia. Still incurable, it directly affects nearly one million people in Europe, and indirectly millions of family members as well as society as a whole. In recent years, the scientific community has suspected that the gut microbiota plays a role in the development of the disease. A team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) in Switzerland, together with Italian colleagues from the National Research and Care Center for Alzheimer's and Psychiatric Diseases Fatebenefratelli in Brescia, University...

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Nov 13
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Here's why conservatives and liberals differ on COVID-19

Here's why conservatives and liberals differ on COVID-19

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, political ideology has been perhaps the strongest predictor of consumers' perceptions of the coronavirus' threat. According to a new study from Lehigh University's College of Business, the differences between conservative and liberal responses to COVID-19 are mitigated when people perceive the virus itself to have agency -- the ability to control its own actions and thus exert power over people.Conservatives are generally more sensitive to threats that are relatively high in agency, propose , assistant professor of marketing in Lehigh University's College...

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lehighu
Nov 13
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Plastic pollution is everywhere. Study reveals how it travels

Plastic pollution is everywhere. Study reveals how it travels

Plastic pollution is ubiquitous today, with microplastic particles from disposable goods found in natural environments throughout the globe, including Antarctica. But how those particles move through and accumulate in the environment is poorly understood. Now a Princeton University study has revealed the mechanism by which microplastics, like Styrofoam, and particulate pollutants are carried long distances through soil and other porous media, with implications for preventing the spread and accumulation of contaminants in food and water sources.The , published in Science Advances on November...

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eprinceton
Nov 13
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Dogs are sensitive to their owners' choice despite their own preference

Dogs are sensitive to their owners' choice despite their own preference

Inspired by work on infants, researchers at the Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE ) investigated whether dogs' behaviors are guided by human displays of preference or by the animals' own choices. They found that dogs' looking times, but not fetching behavior, were influenced by the owner's expression of preference. Although the studies did not demonstrate that dogs override their own preferences for an object, the results suggested that the owners' expressed preference was perceived by the dogs and guided their perceptual focus.Studies on animal cognition deepen our understanding of the human...

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Nov 12
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Drawing the line to answer art's big questions

Drawing the line to answer art's big questions

Algorithms have shown that the compositional structure of Western landscape paintings changed "suspiciously" smoothly between 1500 and 2000 AD, potentially indicating a selection bias by art curators or in art historical literature, physicists from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and colleagues report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).KAIST statistical physicist Hawoong Jeong worked with statisticians, digital analysts and art historians in Korea, Estonia and the US to clarify whether computer algorithms could help resolve...

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Kaistpr
Nov 13
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Rapid test can ID unknown causes of infections throughout the body

Rapid test can ID unknown causes of infections throughout the body

UC San Francisco scientists have developed a single clinical laboratory test capable of zeroing in on the microbial miscreant afflicting patients hospitalized with serious infections in as little as six hours -- irrespective of what body fluid is sampled, the type or species of infectious agent, or whether physicians start out with any clue as to what the culprit may be.The test will be a lifesaver, speeding appropriate drug treatment for the seriously ill, and should transform the way infectious diseases are diagnosed, said the authors of the study, published November 9, 2020 in ."The...

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ucsf
Nov 10
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New approach to circuit compression could deliver real-world quantum computers years ahead of schedule

New approach to circuit compression could deliver real-world quantum computers years ahead of schedule

A major technical challenge for any practical, real-world quantum computer comes from the need for a large number of physical qubits to deal with errors that accumulate during computation. Such quantum error correction is resource-intensive and computationally time-consuming. But researchers have found an effective software method that enables significant compression of quantum circuits, relaxing the demands placed on hardware development.Quantum computers may still be far from a commercial reality, but what is termed "quantum advantage"-the ability of a quantum computer to compute hundreds...

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Nov 12
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Researchers present wild theory: Water may be naturally occurring on all rocky planets

Researchers present wild theory: Water may be naturally occurring on all rocky planets

The emergence of life is a mystery. Nevertheless, researchers agree that water is a precondition for life. The first cell emerged in water and then evolved to form multicellular organism. The oldest known single-cell organism on Earth is about 3.5 billion years old.So far, so good. But if life emerged in water, where did the water come from?"There are two hypotheses about the emergence of water. One is that it arrives on planets by accident, when asteroids containing water collide with the planet in question," says Professor Martin Bizzarro from the Centre for Star and Planet Formation at...

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Nov 9
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More economic worries mean less caution about COVID-19

More economic worries mean less caution about COVID-19

VANCOUVER, Wash. - Workers experiencing job and financial insecurity are less likely to follow the CDC's guidelines for COVID-19, such as physical distancing, limiting trips from home and washing hands, according to a Washington State University study.The researchers, who surveyed 745 workers in 43 states, also found that state unemployment benefits and COVID-19 policies affected the connection between economic concerns and compliance with COVID-19 precautions.The study shows that a scarcity mindset can play a role in how well people are able to focus on responding to the pandemic, said...

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Nov 9
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New cancer drugs saved over 1.2 million people in the US over 16 years, new study shows

New cancer drugs saved over 1.2 million people in the US over 16 years, new study shows

More than 1.2 million people in the US prevented facing death following a cancer diagnosis, between the year 2000 and 2016, thanks to ever improving treatment options - a large new national study shows.Published in the peer-reviewed , the new findings highlight how new drugs commissioned during this period to target the 15 most common cancer types helped to reduce mortality by 24% per 100,000 people in the States.The study, carried out by experts at PRECISIONheor and Pfizer, also show that 106 new treatments were approved across these 15 most common tumours - including colorectal cancer,...

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Nov 9
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NYUAD study finds stellar flares can lead to the diminishment of a planet's habitability

NYUAD study finds stellar flares can lead to the diminishment of a planet's habitability

Fast facts:Abu Dhabi, UAE, November 9, 2020: In a new study researchers, led by Research Scientist Dimitra Atri of the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD), identified which stars were most likely to host habitable exoplanets based on the calculated erosion rates of the planetary atmospheres.In the paper titled , published in the journal Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society: Letters, Atri and graduate student Shane Carberry Mogan present the process of analyzing flare emission data from NASA's TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) observatory.It was found that...

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nyuniversity
Nov 8
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Indian fossils support new hypothesis for origin of hoofed mammals

Indian fossils support new hypothesis for origin of hoofed mammals

New research published today in the describes a fossil family that illuminates the origin of perissodactyls - the group of mammals that includes horses, rhinos, and tapirs. It provides insights on the controversial question of where these hoofed animals evolved, concluding that they arose in or near present day India.With more than 350 new fossils, the 15-year study pieces together a nearly complete picture of the skeletal anatomy of the Cambaytherium - an extinct cousin of perissodactyls that lived on the Indian subcontinent almost 55 million years ago.Among the findings includes a...

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Nov 6
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China meets ultra-low emissions in advance of the 2020 goal

China meets ultra-low emissions in advance of the 2020 goal

China is working hard to reduce emissions and mitigate global climate change despite the significant challenges it faces as an emerging economy. A recent study shows the country has achieved notable success by beating its own rigorous timetable.Scientists from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), along with other collaborators, recently revealed that China's coal-fired power plants met ultra-low emission (ULE) standards ahead of schedule and also achieved substantial emission reductions between 2014 and 2017.The study, entitled...

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Nov 5
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Awakening after a sleeping pill

Awakening after a sleeping pill

Patient with serious brain injury can temporarily talk, walk, and recognize family membersAwakening after a sleeping pillA patient who could not move and talk spontaneously for eight years started to do so again after being administered a sleeping pill. The spectacular but temporary effect was visualized with brain scans, giving researchers from Radboud university medical center and Amsterdam UMC a better understanding of this disorder's underlying neurophysiological processes. The article has been published in Cortex.Eight years ago, Richard, at the time a man in his late 20s, was...

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Oct 2
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