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CfA Scientists Discover Mysterious Spiral Structures around a "Planet Factory"

CfA Scientists Discover Mysterious Spiral Structures around a "Planet Factory"

You must enable JavaScript to view the search results.CfA Scientists Discover Mysterious Spiral Structures around a "Planet Factory"Release No.: 2020-16Scientists at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (CfA) announced today the discovery of a complex set of spiral arms extending to 1000 astronomical units from the young variable star, RU Lup. The discovery, published in The Astrophysical Journal, reveals new details concerning the size and structure of "planet factories," the protoplanetary disks of gas and dust surrounding stars where planets are born.Observations at the...

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Jul 31
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Gum disease associated with higher gastrointestinal cancer risk

Gum disease associated with higher gastrointestinal cancer risk

MenuNews> > > > Gum disease associated with higher gastrointestinal cancer riskPeople with a history of gum disease have a 52% greater risk of stomach cancer and a 43% greater risk of throat compared to people without gum disease, according to a new led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Having lost two or more teeth also increased risk for these cancers.The study was published online in the journal Gut on July 20, 2020.“Participants with periodontal disease and a higher number of teeth lost had a higher risk of developing the two gastrointestinal cancers, even...

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Jul 31
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COVID-19 and Blood Type | Harvard Medical School

COVID-19 and Blood Type | Harvard Medical School

Olfactory support cells, not neurons, are vulnerable to novel coronavirus infectionWhat can genetics reveal about the coronavirus pandemic?To stem the coronavirus crisis, Harvard Medical School scientists forge ahead on six key fronts Image: Getty ImagesNew research shows single-shot COVID-19 vaccine protects nonhuman primatesOlfactory support cells, not neurons, are vulnerable to novel coronavirus infectionHMS faculty central to creation, operation of Boston’s postacute COVID-19 hospitalUnderstanding the science of SARS-CoV-2 infection in infants, children, teensStudy finds no relationship...

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harvardmed
Aug 1
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Getting a grip on near-field light | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Getting a grip on near-field light | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Read the latest updates on coronavirus from . For SEAS specific-updates, please visitTopics:,Join the Harvard SEAS mailing list.Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical EngineeringLeah Burrows| 617-496-1351 |New model explores the design space of twisted 2D materials,Device could improve quantum and classical communications Using turbulence to generate frequency combs from small ring lasers,

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Jul 27
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How COVID-19 Causes Loss of Smell | Harvard Medical School

How COVID-19 Causes Loss of Smell | Harvard Medical School

This article is part of Harvard Medical School’s  of medicine, biomedical research, medical education and policy related to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the disease COVID-19.Temporary loss of smell, or anosmia, is the main neurological symptom and one of the earliest and most commonly reported indicators of COVID-19. Studies suggest it the disease than other well-known symptoms such as fever and cough, but the underlying mechanisms for loss of smell in patients with COVID-19 have been unclear.Now, an international team of researchers led by neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School has...

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Jul 25
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Close to half of U.S. population projected to have obesity by 2030

Close to half of U.S. population projected to have obesity by 2030

MenuNews> > > > Close to half of U.S. population projected to have obesity by 2030For immediate release: Wednesday, December 18, 2019Boston, MA – About half of the adult U.S. population will have and about a quarter will have severe obesity by 2030, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The study also predicts that in 29 states, more than half of the population will have obesity, and all states will have a prevalence of obesity higher than 35%. The study’s researchers estimate that, currently, 40% of American adults have obesity and 18% have severe...

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Dec 18
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The causes and consequences of COVID-19 misperceptions: understanding the role of news and social media | HKS Misinformation Review

The causes and consequences of COVID-19 misperceptions: understanding the role of news and social media | HKS Misinformation Review

We investigate the relationship between media consumption, misinformation, and important attitudes and behaviours during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We find that comparatively more misinformation circulates on Twitter, while news media tends to reinforce public health recommendations like social distancing. We find that exposure to social media is associated with misperceptions regarding basic facts about COVID-19 while the inverse is true for news media. These misperceptions are in turn associated with lower compliance with social distancing measures. We thus draw a...

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Aengus Bridgman
Jun 19
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Meme factory cultures and content pivoting in Singapore and Malaysia during COVID-19 | HKS Misinformation Review

Meme factory cultures and content pivoting in Singapore and Malaysia during COVID-19 | HKS Misinformation Review

This paper is a qualitative ethnographic study of how a group of meme factories in Singapore and Malaysia have adapted their content programming and social media practices in light of COVID-19. It considers how they have fostered, countered, or challenged the rise and spread of misinformation in both countries. More crucially, the paper considers how meme factories position their contents to speak in a variety of platform-specific and age-appropriate vernaculars to provide public service messaging or social critique to their followers.This paper pivots from existing research on meme...

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Crystal Abidin
Jul 16
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Sniffing Out Smell | Harvard Medical School

Sniffing Out Smell | Harvard Medical School

New study reveals how the brain organizes information about odorsThe premiere of the movie Scent of Mystery in 1960 marked a singular event in the annals of cinema: the first, and last, motion picture debut “in glorious Smell-O-Vision.”Hoping to wow moviegoers with a dynamic olfactory experience alongside the familiar spectacles of sight and sound, select theaters were outfitted with a Rube Goldberg-esque device that piped different scents directly to seats.Audiences and critics quickly concluded that the experience stunk. Fraught with technical issues, Smell-O-Vision was panned and became...

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Jul 3
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Pandemics & propaganda: how Chinese state media creates and propagates CCP coronavirus narratives | HKS Misinformation Review

Pandemics & propaganda: how Chinese state media creates and propagates CCP coronavirus narratives | HKS Misinformation Review

To gain insight into how Chinese state media is communicating about the coronavirus pandemic to the outside world, we analyzed a collection of posts from their English-language presence on Facebook. We observed three recurring behaviors: sharing positive stories and promoting the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) pandemic response, rewriting recent history in a manner favorable to the CCP as the coronavirus pandemic evolved, and using targeted ads to spread preferred messages. Although spin is not unique to state actors, paid ad campaigns to promote government-run state media pages containing...

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Vanessa Molter
Jun 9
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Multifunctional nanofiber protects against extreme temperatures and fast-moving projectiles | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Multifunctional nanofiber protects against extreme temperatures and fast-moving projectiles | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Read the latest updates on coronavirus from . For SEAS specific-updates, please visitSince World War I, the vast majority of American combat casualties has come not from gunshot wounds but from explosions. Today, most soldiers wear a heavy, bullet-proof vest to protect their torso but much of their body remains exposed to the indiscriminate aim of explosive fragments and shrapnel. Designing equipment to protect extremities against the extreme temperatures and deadly projectiles that accompany an explosion has been difficult because of a fundamental property of materials. Materials that are...

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Jul 1
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More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early death

More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early death

MenuNews> > > More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early deathFor immediate release: June 26, 2020Boston, MA – Strengthening U.S. air quality standards for to be in compliance with current World Health Association (WHO) guidelines could save more than 140,000 lives over the course of a decade, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The , published June 26, 2020 in Sciences Advances, provides the most comprehensive evidence to date of the causal link between long-term exposure to fine particulate (PM2.5) and premature death, according to the...

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Jun 26
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Following healthy lifestyle habits at middle age may increase years lived free of chronic diseases

Following healthy lifestyle habits at middle age may increase years lived free of chronic diseases

MenuNews> > > > Following healthy lifestyle habits at middle age may increase years lived free of chronic diseasesFor immediate release: Wednesday, January 8, 2020Boston, MA – Maintaining five healthy habits—eating a , regularly, keeping a , not drinking too much , and not —at may increase years lived free of type 2 , , and , according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The study was published online January 8, 2020 in BMJ. It is a follow-up and extension of a 2018 , which found that following these habits increased overall life expectancy.“Previous studies have...

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Jan 9
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Object Origins | Harvard Medical School

Object Origins | Harvard Medical School

Every year, an estimated 48 million Americans from foodborne illnesses, resulting in some 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This public health problem is compounded by billions in economic damage from product recalls, highlighting the need to rapidly and accurately determine the sources of foodborne illnesses.With the increasing complexity of global supply chains for the myriad foods available to consumers, however, the task of tracing the exact origin of contaminated items can be difficult.In a novel solution that...

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Jun 5
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Sleep, Death and … the Gut? | Harvard Medical School

Sleep, Death and … the Gut? | Harvard Medical School

Video: Rick Groleau Virtual reality experiments reveal how visual cues reorganize direction-sensing neuronsThe neurobiology of fruit fly courtship helps illuminates human disorders of motivationScreens of resident physicians entering training miss many at risk for significant sleep impairment…A pair of studies illuminate vaccine promise, immune protection against repeat coronavirus…How the new coronavirus damages the heartGraduating HMS students hold marriage ceremony in midst of COVID pandemicStay Up to Date© 2020 by The President and Fellows of Harvard College

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Jun 4
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Black Hole Outburst Caught on Video | ChandraBlog | Fresh Chandra News

Black Hole Outburst Caught on Video | ChandraBlog | Fresh Chandra News

NASA's flagship mission for X-ray astronomy.Astronomers have caught a hurling hot material into space at close to the speed of light. This flare-up was captured in a new movie from .The black hole and its companion star make up a system called MAXI J1820+070, located in our Galaxy about 10,000 light years from Earth. The black hole in MAXI J1820+070 has a mass about eight times that of the Sun, identifying it as a so-called , formed by the destruction of a massive star. (This is in contrast to that contain millions or billions of times the Sun's mass.)The companion star orbiting the black...

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Jun 2
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Scientists Discover Brightest Supernova Ever Seen

Scientists Discover Brightest Supernova Ever Seen

You must enable JavaScript to view the search results.Scientists Discover Brightest Supernova Ever SeenRelease No.: 2020-06Scientists at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian today announced the discovery and study of the brightest, most energetic, and likely most massive supernova ever identified.SN2016aps is believed to be an example of a "pulsational pair instability" supernova, and may have formed as the result of the merging of two massive stars prior to the explosion. The explosion energy of SN2016aps was ten times that of a normal-sized supernova."SN2016aps is...

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Mar 23
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A message from President Bacow on climate change | Harvard University

A message from President Bacow on climate change | Harvard University

Dear Members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences,I write to inform you of the Corporation’s response to the resolution regarding climate change adopted at the February meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. I had promised to report back to you in person before the end of the semester, but I hope this communication will suffice.Both the faculty-authored white paper Harvard’s Response to the Climate Crisis (Chaplin et al.) and the arguments and comments it generated earlier this year reinforced our shared goal: confronting the existential threat posed by climate change through a variety...

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Apr 23
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