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Are You Ready for the Quantum Computing Revolution?

Are You Ready for the Quantum Computing Revolution?

The quantum race is already underway. Governments and private investors all around the world are pouring billions of dollars into quantum research and development. Satellite-based quantum key distribution for encryption has been demonstrated, laying the groundwork for a potential quantum security-based global communication network. IBM Google Microsoft Amazon and other companies are investing heavily in developing large-scale quantum computing hardware and software.  Nobody is quite there yet. Even so, business leaders should consider developing strategies to address three main areas: 1.)...

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Sep 17
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Don’t Let the Pandemic Set Back Gender Equality

Don’t Let the Pandemic Set Back Gender Equality

A new McKinsey analysis shows that women’s jobs are 1.8 times more vulnerable during the coronavirus pandemic than men’s jobs: Women make up 39% of global employment but account for 54% of overall job losses as of May 2020. At the same time, they bear the burden of unpaid health and child care. This setback follows a five-year period in which tangible progress toward equality in work and society stagnated. Policy makers and business leaders need to act fast to push for greater gender equality, and CEOs can start with three immediate actions. First, they can track the data: Are job losses or...

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Sep 16
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How Amazon Automated Work and Put Its People to Better Use

How Amazon Automated Work and Put Its People to Better Use

Replacing people with AI may seem tempting, but it’s also likely a mistake. Amazon’s “hands off the wheel” initiative might be a model for how companies can adopt AI to automate repetitive jobs, but keep employees on the payroll by transferring them to more creative roles where they can add more value to the company. Amazon’s choice to eliminate jobs but retain the workers and move them into new roles allowed the company to be more nimble and find new ways to stay ahead of competitors.At an automation conference in late 2018, a high-ranking banking official looked up from his buffet plate...

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Sep 16
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Is CEO a Two-Person Job?

Is CEO a Two-Person Job?

Convention wisdom says corporations must have a single point of accountability — and a single CEO. This piece, by co-CEOs of a large polling organization, counters that argument. The authors maintain that the outsized expectations of a modern CEO make the job too big for any one person, and that having two people with complementary skills share the role can create more effective and accountable leadership.When Netflix announced this summer that it was elevating Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos to co-CEO, sharing the title with founder Reed Hastings, the move cut against conventional...

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Sep 15
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Remote Work Doesn’t Have to Mean All-Day Video Calls

Remote Work Doesn’t Have to Mean All-Day Video Calls

When people work from home they are often expected to be virtually present during the regular workday. This can pose problems as people juggle the realities of working from home. GitLab, which has long worked all remotely, has shown that working from home can be highly flexible, mixing asynchronous and synchronous work as appropriate according to the importance of tacit communication at the task level. GitLab’s process is enabled by respecting: (1) clear boundaries at the task level between doing tasks and declaring them done; (2) the minimum viable change principe; and (3) the need for...

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Sep 9
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The Future Economy Project: Q&A with Henry M. Paulson Jr.

The Future Economy Project: Q&A with Henry M. Paulson Jr.

Future EconomyHenry M. Paulson Jr. is the Chairman of the Paulson Institute, whose mission is to strength the U.S.-China relationship and advance sustainable economic growth in both countries. He served as U.S. secretary of the treasury from 2006 to 2009 and is a former chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesThis article is about

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harvardbiz
Nov 15
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Diversity and Inclusion Efforts That Really Work

Diversity and Inclusion Efforts That Really Work

A Stanford and Harvard professor convened a symposium on what’s actually working to improve diversity and inclusion in organizational life. In this article, David Pedulla summarizes the main findings. First, organizations should set goals, collect data, and hold people accountable for improving diversity within the organization. Second, organizations should abandon traditional discrimination and harassment reporting systems — these often lead to retaliation. Employee Assistance Plans (EAPs), ombuds offices, and transformative dispute resolution systems can play a critical role in not only...

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harvardbiz
May 12
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Every Business Can Be a Subscription Business

Every Business Can Be a Subscription Business

XGo Back 15 secondsPlayGo Foward 15 secondsPlayShareAll episodesRobbie Kellman Baxter, a strategy consultant, says that subscriptions aren’t just for newspapers and Netflix. She argues that they can actually help companies — from local retailers to giant industrial manufacturers — earn more consistent revenue and develop stronger customer loyalty. And she explains how even during an economic crisis, leaders can adopt a subscription business model to give their organizations a better chance of surviving and thriving. Baxter is the author of the book .CURT NICKISCH:  Welcome to the HBR...

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harvardbiz
Jul 21
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Research: Poor Health Reduces Global GDP by 15% Each Year

Research: Poor Health Reduces Global GDP by 15% Each Year

Making prudent investments in global health will not only dramatically improve people’s quality of life, it’s a $12 trillion economic opportunity, according to new research by the McKinsey Global Institute. The Covid-19 pandemic has demonstrated that rapid transformation of our health care architecture is possible. Health care providers, pharmaceutical companies, and the med-tech industry can build on recent innovations, and companies outside the health sector are learning the importance of proactively shaping healthy communities.To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up...

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harvardbiz
Jul 8
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Research: How Workers Shift from One Industry to Another

Research: How Workers Shift from One Industry to Another

Today, millions of Americans who labored in retail and hospitality jobs, which remain decimated by the stay-at-home directives issued during the Covid-19 crisis, might need to pivot to new fields in search of employment. New research highlights ways in which people from hard-hit industries, such as hospitality, retail, and transportation might transition to stronger ones through targeted upskilling.To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up for the newsletter.With unemployment claims in the United States now reaching more than , the pandemic is laying bare the great...

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harvardbiz
Jul 7
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That Discomfort You’re Feeling Is Grief

That Discomfort You’re Feeling Is Grief

During the global pandemic, a palpable sense of collective grief has emerged. Grief expert David Kessler says that grief is actually multiple feelings that we must manage. In an interview with HBR, he explains how the classic five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, sadness, acceptance) apply today, and the practical steps we can take to manage the anxiety. Those include balancing bad thoughts with good; focusing on the present; letting go of things you can’t control; and stocking up on compassion. Kessler also talks about a sixth stage of grief: meaning. After acceptance, he says,...

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harvardbiz
Mar 23
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A Way Forward for Small Businesses

A Way Forward for Small Businesses

Small businesses with fewer than 500 employees account for 48% of American jobs and 43.5% of GDP, and they are facing an existential threat in the wake of the coronavirus crisis.  To understand the economic impacts on small business, the authors surveyed roughly 5,800 companies nationwide. They found these companies to be cash-strapped, with many having shut down or laid off workers, and uncertain about whether federal assistance will work for them. They offer five recommendations for small businesses navigating an uncertain future: 1) Don’t rush decisions, but do make plans; 2) Get in line...

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harvardbiz
Apr 13
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Preparing Your Business for a Post-Pandemic World

Preparing Your Business for a Post-Pandemic World

Coronavirus has impacted the world at an unprecedented level — and unfortunately, the worst has yet to come. Companies need to act today in order to bounce back successfully in a post-corona marketplace. The authors suggest executives ask themselves the following five strategic questions: 1. Which position can you achieve during and after the coronavirus pandemic? 2. What is your action plan to bounce back? 3. How will your culture and organizational identity be changed by the crisis? 4. Which new projects do you need to launch, run, and coordinate? 5. How well prepared are you to carry out...

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harvardbiz
Apr 10
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How Digital Contact Tracing Slowed Covid-19 in East Asia

How Digital Contact Tracing Slowed Covid-19 in East Asia

East Asian countries have had striking success flattening the Covid-19 curve. The key is aggressive application of mobile contact-tracing technologies — either voluntary or mandatory — and a collectivist spirit that encourages a civic-minded embrace of and a more willing compliance with governments’ infection control efforts. These technologies work, but require privacy violations that western democracies may be unwilling to accept. Technologies that preserve privacy while permitting effective tracing may be part of the solution.To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up...

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harvardbiz
Apr 15
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How to Negotiate with a Procurement Team

How to Negotiate with a Procurement Team

Service providers often feel frustrated when they are funneled into a procurement process to win deals with clients. Their choice, as they see it, is either to walk away, or capitulate to procurement’s rules, thus losing the opportunity for potentially significant value creation (and future profit). They  enter a predicament called “winning the pitch but losing the negotiation.” But it doesn’t have to be this way. Rather than deciding how to respond to ultimata and threats, sellers can instead use two key moves to improve their fortunes: Analyze the set-up and shape the process.Imagine the...

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harvardbiz
Mar 10
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What It Takes to Run a Great Virtual Meeting

What It Takes to Run a Great Virtual Meeting

Not being able to work together in the same room with colleagues may become a major challenge due to the coronavirus outbreak. To make virtual meetings work, you might need to adjust how your team conducts them. Prioritize video, but offer a dial-in option. Test the technology ahead of time and make sure faces can be seen. Follow general meeting best practices, such as having a clear objective and circulating an agenda. Minimize presentation length, use an icebreaker to get everyone talking, assign a facilitator, call on participants, and capture real-time feedback via polling systems to...

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harvardbiz
Mar 10
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The Essential Clayton Christensen Articles

The Essential Clayton Christensen Articles

Clayton M. Christensen is best known for his theory of “disruptive innovation,” but he published a number of seminal articles on management, exploring everything from organizational structure to product innovation; financial tools to mergers and acquisitions. Here is a collection of 11 essential articles.Editor’s note: Clayton Christensen died on Jan. 23, 2020. Here we present some of his seminal HBR pieces through an adaptation of the introduction to the book The Clayton M. Christensen Reader.Clayton M. Christensen is best known for his theory of disruptive innovation, in which he warns...

hbr.org
Jan 30
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Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?

Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?

It’s possible to fake emotional intelligence. Well-intended leaders can go into interactions armed with what they believe is a combination of deep empathy, attuned listening, and self-awareness but is, in fact, a way to serve their own emotional needs. There are three common counterfeit emotions to watch out for. First, there’s rescuing disguised as empathy: When expressing empathy for those you lead, pay attention to any need you might have to be the hero. Compassionate understanding for the challenges of others is emotionally intelligent. Rescuing them from the consequences of those...

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Ron Carucci
May 26
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What It Takes to Think Deeply About Complex Problems

What It Takes to Think Deeply About Complex Problems

The problems we’re facing often seem as intractable as they do complex. But as Albert Einstein famously observed, “We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” So what does it take to increase the complexity of our thinking? To cultivate a more nuanced, spacious perspective, start by challenging your convictions. Ask yourself, “What am I not seeing here?” and “What else might be true?” Second, do your most challenging task first every day, when your mind is fresh and before distractions arise. And third, pay attention to how you’re feeling. Embracing...

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Tony Schwartz
May 13
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The Amazon–Whole Foods Deal Means Every Other Retailer’s Three-Year Plan Is Obsolete

The Amazon–Whole Foods Deal Means Every Other Retailer’s Three-Year Plan Is Obsolete

When Amazon announced last week that it will acquire Whole Foods Market, a grocery chain with over 450 retail stores and deep industry talent, for $13.7 billion, Amazon’s stock price rose 2.4% on the news, increasing its market capitalization by $11 billion. At the same time, the price of SuperValu plummeted 14.4%, Kroger dropped 9.2%, and Sprouts fell 6.3%. You could almost hear the three-year plans of every grocer, and nearly every other traditional retailer, grinding through the shredding machines.Nobody in the industry should be surprised that the future of retailing is moving toward...

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Darrell K. Rigby
Jun 22
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Tony Schwartz

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