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Trump’s last-minute pardons included a Philly radio host

Trump’s last-minute pardons included a Philly radio host

It was 5:30 a.m. Wednesday when Gary Hendler shot up in bed in his Ardmore home to scroll through the list of the 73 people President Donald Trump had just pardoned. He’d given up hope of seeing his name. Related stories Six years ago he filled out a 90-page application to get pardoned for a drug-related crime he’d committed in the early 1980s. “I didn’t think I would get it from Trump. I’m not famous. I’m not anything.” Hendler didn’t even vote for Trump. “Then I saw Gary Evan Hendler and I got all choked up. I couldn’t believe it,” he said, his voice cracking. “It’s a miracle.” He turned...

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Barbara Laker
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Suspect in the shooting death of a man walking his dog in Brewerytown was freed on bail two weeks earlier

Suspect in the shooting death of a man walking his dog in Brewerytown was freed on bail two weeks earlier

Two weeks before he allegedly killed a man who was out walking his dog in Brewerytown, a suspect in the slaying — who had two previous robbery convictions — was released on dramatically lowered bail in an armed kidnapping and an assault case, court records show. Police said Sunday that they had arrested Davis L. Josephus, 20, in the slaying of 25-year-old Milan Loncar, who was shot Wednesday night while walking his dog about a block from his home. » READ MORE: On Dec. 29, Josephus posted $20,000 bail on charges of motor vehicle theft and kidnapping, and $12,000 on charges including...

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Chris Palmer
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Redistricting will be the definitive political fight of 2021 in Pennsylvania. Here’s how it’ll work.

Redistricting will be the definitive political fight of 2021 in Pennsylvania. Here’s how it’ll work.

This article is part of a yearlong reporting project focused on redistricting and gerrymandering in Pennsylvania. It’s made possible by the support of members and , a project focused on election integrity and voting access. HARRISBURG — With partisanship in the Pennsylvania legislature at peak levels, lawmakers this year are gearing up for the once-a-decade brawl to redraw political districts — and the stakes couldn’t be much higher. The state is set to lose a congressional seat. The representation of millions of people is on the line. And after a bruising 2020 marred by politicized court...

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Marie Albiges of Spotlight PA
6d ago
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Bill McSwain’s reign as U.S. attorney is ending. Can Biden undo the damage? | Opinion

Bill McSwain’s reign as U.S. attorney is ending. Can Biden undo the damage? | Opinion

Opinion As is customary when a Presidential administration changes, The soon-to-be former-U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, who was appointed by Donald Trump and sworn into office in 2018. Now that he’s stepping down, it is critical for the Biden administration to prioritize healing some of the wounds that his tenure created. In his time as the highest federal law enforcement officer in the region, McSwain’s office time and again sued, overstepped, and publicly denounced policies of public officials — who were elected by a majority of Philadelphia voters and represent...

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Abraham Gutman
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COVID-19 death of Original Philly Cheesesteak supervisor triggers a lawsuit against meatpacking giant

COVID-19 death of Original Philly Cheesesteak supervisor triggers a lawsuit against meatpacking giant

A trio of cases represents the first of what may become a tidal wave of thousands of COVID-related liability suits.On April 2, Brian Barker’s supervisors at the Original Philly Cheesesteak Co. plant in North Philadelphia handed him an electronic thermometer. He was ordered to scan the temperatures of his fellow employees as they arrived for work.For Barker, 61, of Northeast Philadelphia, it would be his last day on the job.The next day, plant owner Tyson Foods temporarily closed the 250-employee facility because of COVID-19. Barker was diagnosed with COVID-19 on April 7. And by April 23, he...

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Sam Wood
5d ago
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'I trusted people and lost everything.' This South Philly butcher is making a comeback.

'I trusted people and lost everything.' This South Philly butcher is making a comeback.

Column On Tuesday afternoon, butcher Raul Aguilar-Perez was carefully selecting his chiles, toasting the anchos, guajillos, pasillas, and puyas to a char on the plancha to intensify their flavor, then letting them steep as he prepared the spices, ground pork, oregano, and vinegar to make chorizo — a batch of sausage that could potentially change his life. A tasting was scheduled the next day with both the president and head chef of Di Bruno Bros., the company that gave Aguilar-Perez his first steady job as a new immigrant in the Italian Market over 20 years ago — eventually sponsoring him...

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Craig LaBan
5d ago
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Pentagon chief orders NSA to install White House official as career lawyer

Pentagon chief orders NSA to install White House official as career lawyer

WASHINGTON - Acting defense secretary Christopher Miller ordered the director of the National Security Agency to install on Saturday a former GOP political operative as the NSA’s top lawyer, according to four individuals familiar with the matter. It is unclear what the NSA will do. The agency and the Pentagon declined to comment. In November, Pentagon General Counsel Paul Ney Jr. named Michael Ellis, then a White House official, to the position of general counsel at the NSA, a career civilian post at the government's largest and most technologically advanced spy agency, The Post reported....

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Ellen Nakashima
4d ago
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A fired Philly cop who hit a Temple student with his baton during George Floyd protests was cleared of criminal charges

A fired Philly cop who hit a Temple student with his baton during George Floyd protests was cleared of criminal charges

Fired Philadelphia police inspector Joseph Bologna Jr., for beating a Temple University student with a baton at George Floyd protests, was cleared of criminal charges Friday after a judge tossed out his case at a preliminary hearing. Municipal Court Judge Henry Lewandowski III ruled that the District Attorney’s Office had not presented enough evidence to establish that Bologna’s use of his baton against Evan Gorski — captured on video — amounted to a crime. Related stories Bologna’s attorneys were quick to cast the decision as a “great victory.” And leaders in the police union — which had...

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Chris Palmer
5d ago
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Brewerytown man murdered while walking his dog is mourned as 'the kindest person'

Brewerytown man murdered while walking his dog is mourned as 'the kindest person'

The day after her brother was fatally shot while out walking his dog, Jelena Loncar sat outside her Brewerytown home Thursday, crying and still in disbelief while holding and petting the dachshund-Chihuahua mix, Roo. “He was the kindest person in the entire world. This is so screwed up,” she said of her brother, a Temple University graduate. Related stories Milan Loncar, 25, was on Jefferson Street near 31st about a block from his Brewerytown home when he was approached by two males during an apparent robbery, police said. One male pointed a handgun at the victim and then both started...

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Julie Shaw
4d ago
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The violence and conspiracy theories Trump fueled will threaten America long after he leaves | Trudy Rubin

The violence and conspiracy theories Trump fueled will threaten America long after he leaves | Trudy Rubin

Opinion The insurrectionist violence Donald Trump incited won’t end when he leaves the White House. The pro-Trump groups that sacked the Capitol on Jan. 6 pose such a threat to the inauguration on Jan. 20 that , more than twice the total in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria. But the threat won’t end on Jan. 20, either. Related stories Thanks to Trump, an array of armed white supremacist militias, conspiracy cults like QAnon, antigovernment “Patriot” movements, neo-Nazis, and garden-variety MAGA boosters have found common cause. The president’s Big Lie about a stolen election, which he, along...

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Trudy Rubin
6d ago
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Biden unveils a $1.9 trillion plan to stem the coronavirus and steady the economy

Biden unveils a $1.9 trillion plan to stem the coronavirus and steady the economy

WILMINGTON, Del. — President-elect Joe Biden unveiled a $1.9 trillion coronavirus plan Thursday to end “a crisis of deep human suffering” by speeding up vaccines and pumping out financial help to those struggling with the pandemic’s prolonged economic fallout. Called the “American Rescue Plan,” the legislative proposal would meet Biden’s goal of administering 100 million vaccines by the 100th day of his administration, and advance his objective of reopening most schools by the spring. On a parallel track, it delivers another round of aid to stabilize the economy while the public health...

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Bill Barrow
6d ago
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Retired Delco firefighter accused of injuring officers and a Del. man who paraded a Confederate flag are charged in the Capitol riot

Retired Delco firefighter accused of injuring officers and a Del. man who paraded a Confederate flag are charged in the Capitol riot

A recently retired Delaware County firefighter accused of lobbing a fire extinguisher at police and a father-and-son duo from Delaware caught on camera smashing windows and parading a Confederate flag through the Capitol surrendered to federal authorities Thursday to face charges tied to the . Prosecutors said Robert Sanford, a 26-year veteran of the Chester Fire Department who left the force in February, injured three people when he tossed the extinguisher at the head of an officer as part of a mob that broke through barricades on the Capitol’s west side. They noted that the incident was...

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Jeremy Roebuck
6d ago
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Essential workers, people 75 and up, and others will be vaccinated next in Philly, while indoor dining, colleges, and theaters can reopen

Essential workers, people 75 and up, and others will be vaccinated next in Philly, while indoor dining, colleges, and theaters can reopen

Essential workers and people 75 and older in Philadelphia could begin receiving the coronavirus vaccine later this month, city officials announced Tuesday, releasing guidelines that provided the first clear information for hundreds of thousands of residents — from teachers to public transit drivers to grocery clerks — about when they might get the long-awaited shots. The city’s second stage of vaccine distribution will also include people with high-risk medical conditions and people living in group facilities and jails. It could begin as soon as Jan. 25, Health Commissioner Thomas Farley...

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Justine McDaniel
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Jan 13
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Democrats seek investigation of possible GOP ‘accomplices’ in Capitol insurrection

Democrats seek investigation of possible GOP ‘accomplices’ in Capitol insurrection

WASHINGTON — Even as Democrats on Wednesday , they turned their attention to allegations that Republican members of Congress encouraged last week’s insurrection, possibly providing help that enabled the mob that stormed the Capitol. “Their accomplices in this House will be held responsible,” Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a speech during the impeachment debate, without mentioning specific members or allegations. In the week since , immediately preceded by Trump’s remarks at a rally, a number of Democrats have pointed to speeches, tweets, and videos that they have said raised questions...

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Karoun Demirjian
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7d ago
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Troy Aikman: ‘Difference of opinion’ at Eagles quarterback position fueled Doug Pederson’s firing

Troy Aikman: ‘Difference of opinion’ at Eagles quarterback position fueled Doug Pederson’s firing

Doug Pederson’s firing Monday was good news for Carson Wentz and not-so-good news for Jalen Hurts, Troy Aikman said. The Fox Sports analyst and Hall of Fame quarterback was a guest on the Michael Irvin Podcast on PodcastOne, which drops Thursday morning. He said he spoke with Pederson after he was let go by the Eagles. Related stories Aikman said he gathered from his conversation with Pederson that “a difference of opinion in how they were going to move forward with the quarterback position” played a role in his firing. “Jeffrey Lurie has paid a lot of money to Carson Wentz, and they’re on...

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Paul Domowitch
Jan 13
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First it was ‘fraud,’ then they just didn’t like the rules: How Pa. Republicans justified overturning an election

First it was ‘fraud,’ then they just didn’t like the rules: How Pa. Republicans justified overturning an election

As Joe Biden took the lead in the vote count and then , some of the state’s top Republicans to that the election was stolen and rife with fraud. U.S. Rep. Scott Perry joined a “Stop the Steal” rally in Harrisburg and later as a “horrific embarrassment.” » LIVE UPDATES:  “They say, ‘Oh, you know, 100,000 votes just showed up, and oh by the way, they all just happen to be for Joe Biden,’” he said in one interview on Nov 6. “We had dead people voting. We had a lot of people voting two or three times,” U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly said during a Nov. 24 . And U.S. Rep. Guy Reschenthaler went on the...

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Jonathan Tamari
Jan 13
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A federal court rejected the plan for a supervised injection site in Philly

A federal court rejected the plan for a supervised injection site in Philly

In a setback to advocates who had hoped to open the nation’s first supervised injection site in Philadelphia, a federal appellate court ruled Tuesday that such a facility would violate a law known as the “crack house” statute and open its operators to potential prosecution. In a 2-1 decision, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit lauded the goals behind Safehouse — the nonprofit that, in an attempt to stem the city’s tide of opioid-related deaths, has proposed the site to provide medical supervision to people using drugs. But, Circuit Judge Stephanos Bibas...

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Aubrey Whelan
Jan 12
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Should college students be required to get the COVID-19 vaccine? It’s too early for colleges to decide

Should college students be required to get the COVID-19 vaccine? It’s too early for colleges to decide

Editor's Note News about the coronavirus is changing quickly. The latest information can be found at As president of student government at Temple University, Quinn Litsinger intends to get the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available for his age group — and he intends to encourage others to get it, too. But he also noted that Temple has a diverse student body and he understands groups that have been marginalized may be skeptical about vaccines. So, he wouldn’t want Temple to make it a requirement. Related stories Coronavirus Coverage “I don’t think it’s my place or the place of Temple to...

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Susan Snyder
Jan 10
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Gab, a Pennsylvania-based social network, is the new online hub for the far-right fringe

Gab, a Pennsylvania-based social network, is the new online hub for the far-right fringe

After Twitter banned President Trump last week and Apple, Amazon, and Google all outlined plans to deplatform Parler — the social network that became known as a home for the far right and followers of the conspiracy theory QAnon — many Parler users began to post the same notice: “Follow me on Gab.” That’s the social network born in 2016 in a Philadelphia coworking space, and now based in Clarks Summit, Lackawanna County, in northeastern Pennsylvania, . It first drew national attention in 2018, was revealed to be a Gab regular. Related stories As of April 2019, Gab claimed to have . It’s now...

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Samantha Melamed
Jan 11
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Philadelphia police detective subject of Internal Affairs investigation after allegedly attending D.C. rally

Philadelphia police detective subject of Internal Affairs investigation after allegedly attending D.C. rally

A Philadelphia police detective from the unit that investigates the backgrounds of potential recruits has been temporarily reassigned based on a tip that she attended the rally in Washington where President Donald Trump incited his followers to storm the Capitol. Detective Jennifer Gugger was removed from her position in the police department’s Recruit Background Investigations Unit on Saturday after Internal Affairs received social media posts indicating that she had been at the Wednesday event, departmental sources said. Sgt. Eric Gripp, a police spokesperson, confirmed that a detective...

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Mike Newall
Jan 11
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Fink’s hoagie shop appeals Philly's COVID-19 enforcement: ‘It’s shaking me down’

Fink’s hoagie shop appeals Philly's COVID-19 enforcement: ‘It’s shaking me down’

A hoagie shop was slapped with fees three separate times, and closed once, for a single mask violation in what the owner frames as a power struggle between his small business and the Philadelphia Health Department. in Tacony has been for 14 years, best known for its carefully constructed Italian hoagie, served up on a seeded Liscio’s roll slicked with homemade olive spread. Owner Dennis Fink, a and longtime resident of the Northeast, says his business has been down 40% since the coronavirus pandemic began, bringing in just enough to cover his costs: food, labor, rent, gas, electric, phone....

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Jenn Ladd
Jan 10
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Sen. Pat Toomey says Trump ‘committed impeachable offenses’

Sen. Pat Toomey says Trump ‘committed impeachable offenses’

Pennsylvania Republican Sen. Pat Toomey said Saturday that President Donald Trump “committed impeachable offenses,” becoming the third GOP senator to suggest possible support for removing the president after the this week. Furious discussion among Democrats and some Republicans in Washington continued Saturday about whether Trump should or resign from office before his term ends in 11 days, with Democrats in Congress for by his supporters. “I do think the president committed impeachable offenses,” during an interview on Fox News’ The Journal Editorial Report. “But I don’t know what is going...

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Justine McDaniel
Jan 9
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Twitter permanently suspends Donald Trump’s account after petition from hundreds of employees

Twitter permanently suspends Donald Trump’s account after petition from hundreds of employees

Twitter announced Friday evening that it has permanently suspended Donald Trump’s personal account. “After close review of recent Tweets from the @realDonaldTrump account and the context around them we have permanently suspended the account due to the risk of further incitement of violence,” the company said in a statement. Related stories The social platform had been under growing pressure to take further action against Trump following Wednesday’s deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Twitter initially suspended Trump’s account for 12 hours after he posted a video that repeated false...

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Wire Reports
Jan 9
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From USciences to Argentina and beyond, the son of filmmaker Errol Morris explores psychedelics for VICE TV

From USciences to Argentina and beyond, the son of filmmaker Errol Morris explores psychedelics for VICE TV

While the world waited breathlessly this fall for anything resembling definitive results from the Nov. 3 presidential election, one early winner seemed clear: drugs. New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, and South Dakota all voted to legalize recreational marijuana use for adults. Even more remarkable: Washington, D.C., decriminalized psychedelic drugs, while Oregon legalized psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, marking a historic statewide initiative. Indeed, the landscape around psychedelics — which include psilocybin (the active ingredient in “magic mushrooms”) and LSD, as well...

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John Semley
Jan 6
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A Philly law firm partner agrees to leave his job after taking part in Trump’s Georgia call

A Philly law firm partner agrees to leave his job after taking part in Trump’s Georgia call

Column A lawyer with the Philadelphia firm of Fox Rothschild has quit the firm after it became public that he joined President call in which Trump begged Georgia election officials to overturn the presidential election result there. The lawyer, Alex B. Kaufman, and his father, Robert J. Kaufman, both have departed Fox Rothschild “to pursue new professional opportunities,” the firm said Thursday night. They had joined Fox in its Atlanta officer after dissolving their own firm two years ago. The Kaufmans left after Fox Rothschild confirmed it had a policy preventing its lawyers from working...

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Joseph N. DiStefano
Jan 8
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