inverse.com
inverse.com
Inverse is an American digital media company covering topics such as technology, science, and culture for a millennial audience.Source
New York, NY
Founded 2015
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Scientists discover brain hack that improves language abilities by 13%

Scientists discover brain hack that improves language abilities by 13%

6 hours agoWe all know that you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but what about an old human a new language?Previous suggests that it's much easier for young children to pick up a new language than it may be for their parents or even older siblings. A offers a solution to jump that evolutionary hurdle.Using small, imperceptible brain stimulation through the ear, scientists saw improvements in the abilities of adults to recognize foreign language tones compared to those without stimulation. This memory effect lasted even during trials where the stimulation was paused.This science-fiction...

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1d ago
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Ancient humans had extremely complicated sex loves, evidence shows

Ancient humans had extremely complicated sex loves, evidence shows

2 hours agoEven today's digitally expanded world of has nothing on the ancient world. Hundreds of thousands of years ago, there were roughly of ancient hominids getting it on with their contemporaries. Thanks to new genetic analysis algorithms, scientists have identified the vestiges of this free-wheeling scene, which lives on inside our DNA.This includes material from a mysterious "super archaic" ancestor.Analysis of two genomes, one genome, and four modern human genomes revealed new evidence of gene flow between these species, further confirming that suggests that they mated with one...

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1d ago
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Brightest material in existence may transform solar energy

Brightest material in existence may transform solar energy

1 hour agoThe word fluorescent might bring to mind the harsh, overhead lighting of your high school at worst, or cool, at best, but these types of brightly glowing materials actually play an important role in everything from to solar technology.But despite their wide-applications, these materials have faced a 150-year-old struggle when it comes to transferring their properties from a liquid solution to a solid. This has limited fluorescents' overall use.Chemists reports in a that this decades-long challenge is finally coming to the end thanks to a newly discovered class of materials called...

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1d ago
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PPE poses a major environmental threat. A new study proposes a solution.

PPE poses a major environmental threat. A new study proposes a solution.

9 hours agoAn unfamiliar phrase to many at the beginning of the year, personal protective equipment () — a grouping that includes , face shields, and full-body suits — has become a familiar sight during the Covid-19 pandemic. While this incredibly important equipment back in March and April, single-use PPE is now facing the opposite problem — it is seemingly everywhere, including places where it shouldn't be. Now, it's not unusual to see masks discarded on the side of the road alongside crumpled fast food bags, or littered on the beach. With an approaching tidal wave of waste from this...

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4d ago
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One type of art can help you see the bigger picture in life – study

One type of art can help you see the bigger picture in life – study

Staring into the soothing lines of an image that you can't quite describe is one of the joys of looking at abstract art. It turns out that it's also one of the style's major benefits. New research suggests that abstract art has qualities that can literally change our mindsets, and prompt us to let the minutia of day-to-day life fall away. Over the course of three experiments, scientists at Columbia University found that abstract art tends to evocative of “psychological distance.” Psychological distance is a way to represent how far away events or objects are from ourselves. For instance, a...

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Emma Betuel
4d ago
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Watch the bizarre way this animal escapes an almost certain death

Watch the bizarre way this animal escapes an almost certain death

14 hours agoWhen a beetle gets swallowed up whole by a predatory frog, it's not necessarily the end of the insect's time on Earth.New research delves into how some aquatic beetles can survive being devoured by, essentially, prompting the frog to defecate. Their journey brings a whole new meaning to the phrase, what goes in, must come out.Researcher fed five frog species water-dwelling beetles called Regimbartia attenuata. In lab experiments, 93 percent of the beetles were able to make their way from the frog's mouth to its vent — the hole small animals use to pass waste matter out of their...

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4d ago
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Strange anglerfish sex is teaching scientists about the immune system

Strange anglerfish sex is teaching scientists about the immune system

7.30.2020 6:00 PMAnglerfish is a familiar story: Boy meets girl, boy becomes attached to girl, their bodies and bloodstreams fuse as one, and the pair reproduces happily until the male fish dies. This one-of-a-kind example of sexual parasitism recently caught the curiosity of medical researchers. For most vertebrates, a merging like this would provoke a harmful, even fatal, immune response. But that doesn't happen in anglerfish. To solve this scientific puzzle, researchers took a closer look at the genes behind anglerfish immune systems. One day, the study team argues, these findings could...

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Jul 30
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Scientists shatter the accepted view of how sperm swim — in 3D

Scientists shatter the accepted view of how sperm swim — in 3D

7.31.2020 6:00 PMWhen considering how sperm move, the word "swimmers" comes to mind. The classic microscopic image is of a tiny cell swishing its tail from side to side as it propels forward. A new 3D model upends that premise and presents a sense of movement that's more twirl than shimmy. When sperm cells "swim," they are actually spinning as they move forward. This was reported Friday in the journal Science Advances. Naturally lopsided, sperm tails curve to one side. They do wiggle – but they move to one side only. From the lens of a microscope positioned above a sample, as the curved...

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Jul 31
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A solution to pollution is actually a problem, “forever chemicals” study reveals

A solution to pollution is actually a problem, “forever chemicals” study reveals

7.29.2020 12:00 PMWhen we release substances that don't biodegrade into the environment they are, eventually, bound to end up even in the most remote parts of the Earth. Take , which has been detected from to the heights of the . Another pervasive group of , called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or , are making the similar rounds. In a new , researchers identify 29 types of PFAS in the . The chemicals include a newer material, called HFPO-DA. It was created to replace old compounds (PFOA and PFOS) determined to cause cancer and other health problems. Subsequently, this material has...

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Jul 29
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First-of-its-kind study finds a counterintuitive use for prescription CBD

First-of-its-kind study finds a counterintuitive use for prescription CBD

Mind and Body"This is a large and unmet clinical need."7.28.2020 10:30 PMAs of now, there are no scientifically treatments for , an issue for those fighting a dependence on the drug. The need is there: Studies indicate that 47 percent of people who quit using marijuana experience , while other research suggests of people who use marijuana will become dependent on it. A solution, however, could be on the horizon. In a recent double-blind randomized controlled trial, researchers discovered that (CBD), a chemical compound found in cannabis, can actually help people quit. The study team found...

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Jul 28
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Gorilla cliques mirror human relationships — study

Gorilla cliques mirror human relationships — study

17 hours agoOur daily interactions — whether they be in-person or — can involve dozens of other people. But chances are, you only consider a few of those people to be your closest friends. The same seems to be true for gorillas, new research on their social circles suggests. The findings add to growing evidence of between human and gorilla social networks. A published Tuesday in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B examines social relationships among 13 groups over 12 years. The gorillas studied live in a national park in Rwanda.Gorillas typically live in groups of 12 to 20...

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Jul 28
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Sleep tech allows scientists to control dreams

Sleep tech allows scientists to control dreams

11 hours agoThe average person will spend a whopping of their life asleep, which means nearly a quarter of our time on Earth is spent exploring dreamworlds of our own creation. Dating back to in the early 20th century, sleep scientists have speculated that these dreams are our minds' way of assessing and sorting through .But how exactly our minds do this and what dreaming's impact is on our waking lives has long eluded scientists. To dig deeper into our dreams and their potential, scientists from MIT, Harvard, Boston College, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have designed a sleep...

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Jul 28
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Ancient microbes in the "deadest" part of Earth redefine boundaries of life

Ancient microbes in the "deadest" part of Earth redefine boundaries of life

1 hour agoImagine you're running a — but instead of a route that loops, you run the distance in a straight line from start to finish. Now, conceptualize that, instead of traveling horizontally, you're running straight down, burrowing into the Earth. That's how far beneath the ocean's surface scientists dug to explore whether life can persist in ancient sediment — a region that was previously believed to be lifeless. They found not only life but whole communities of microbes that have lived for more than 100 million years. A team of Japanese and American scientists reports this discovery in...

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Jul 28
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Landmark study on 11,196 couples pinpoints what dating apps get so wrong

Landmark study on 11,196 couples pinpoints what dating apps get so wrong

If you have ever labored over how to convey your personality through a dating app bio — or judged someone else's through theirs — research on romance suggests you place your efforts elsewhere. It's taken 20 years of relationship science to get here, but scientists now argue that there's something far more important than your personality or even your partner's when it comes to cultivating happy relationships. The most powerful predictors of relationship quality are the characteristics of the relationship itself — the life dynamic you build with your person. This is according to an analysis...

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Emma Betuel
Jul 27
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Longevity study reveals why ancient trees can stave off death

Longevity study reveals why ancient trees can stave off death

1 hour agoFor at least 2,500 years — possibly much longer — the tree , a Japanese cypress, has lived on the legendary in Japan. In Sicily, the is an estimated 2,000 to 4,000 years old. Meanwhile, the world’s oldest tree is a bristlecone pine named in eastern California. For the tree's safety, its exact location is a . It is 4,851 years old. Through a special combination of biological defenses, these elder florae are able to escape some of the most taxing effects of aging. New research illuminates why. To deal with environmental stress like extreme temperatures, drought, and nutrient...

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Jul 27
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This squid-inspired protein is the future of PPE

This squid-inspired protein is the future of PPE

just nowAs infections continue to spread, the importance of keeping a with you at all times is unparalleled. But after repeated wear and washing, these masks can become tattered and leave you exposed to the virus through tiny, threadbare holes. Scientists are looking to solve this problem before it becomes commonplace by synthesizing special proteins found in squids to create a self-healing material that can extend the life of both masks and ventilators. In a published Monday in the journal Nature Materials, a team of material scientists and engineers from Germany, Turkey, and Penn State...

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Jul 27
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Ancient human sex changed how some people feel pain

Ancient human sex changed how some people feel pain

6 hours agoBetween 40,000 and 60,000 years ago, humans and Neanderthals before the latter . We probably didn't feel their pain then, but about 0.4 percent of Britons probably feel it now, thanks to a genetic gift from those the hominids. A gene variant that can be traced all the way back to , but is still present in about 0.4 percent of modern humans in Britain, may make pain feel even sharper. Out of the 362,944 British citizens in the study, those who had that Neanderthal-derived gene were 7 percent more likely to report at least one pain symptom, compared to those who didn't have the...

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Jul 23
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How mosquitos got their taste for human blood — study

How mosquitos got their taste for human blood — study

1 hour agoCertainly one of the worst — and definitely the itchiest — parts of is an increase in bites. But of the 3,500 species of , only a few are prone to hunting humans. New research looks at why the needle-nosed bloodsuckers gain a preference for people in the first place. Climate and population are the major factors that drive mosquitoes to develop a taste for human blood, finds a published Thursday in the journal Current Biology. As places , local mosquitoes become more likely to bite humans — but only in regions with significant dry seasons. Through genetic analysis, researchers...

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Jul 23
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23andMe study untangles the brutal history of American slavery

23andMe study untangles the brutal history of American slavery

1 hour agoBetween the 16th and 19th centuries, ships of enslaved people sailed to the Americas — an abhorrent chapter that lives on in and genetic code. In a published Thursday in the American Journal of Human Genetics, researchers carried out the "most comprehensive genetic investigation of the transatlantic slave trade" to date. The team combined historical records and shipping manifests, modern scholarship, and genetic data of more than 50,000 people living in the Americas and across the Atlantic coastline of Africa.The genetic data was collected by the consumer personal genetics...

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Jul 23
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The Boring Company: Elon Musk shares stunning station image and bus details

The Boring Company: Elon Musk shares stunning station image and bus details

The Boring Company, Elon Musk's tunnel-digging venture, is getting ready to unveil its first public tunnel. On Wednesday, Musk shared a new image with his 37 million Twitter followers. The new concept render appears to show one of the three stations planned for the Las Vegas Convention Center project. The two tunnels are designed to take 4,400 attendees per hour in one of two directions over a distance of nearly a mile. The work is part of a planned redevelopment of the center, and the tunnels are expected to be ready for the annual Consumer Electronics Show early next year. In a response...

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Mike Brown
Jul 22
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20 science and tech predictions for 2020s

20 science and tech predictions for 2020s

7.18.2020 2:15 PMIt's the dawn of a new decade — and that means a new era of science and technology to excite and delight. Here at Inverse, we know that predicting the future is a fool's errand. Heck, we can't even predict the weather all that well. But we can look at the trends already in motion and map out a forecast for the future.These are our top 20 predictions for science and technology for the 2020s, from artificial intelligence passing the Turing test to what we expect from the NASA Mars 2020 mission, and everything we see on the horizon for gene-editing.20.

inverse.com
Jan 28
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Musk Reads: SpaceX Starlink beta test details emerge

Musk Reads: SpaceX Starlink beta test details emerge

7.21.2020 9:26 AMStarlink starts taking addresses and Crew Dragon prepares to return home. The Boring Company on Mars? It’s Musk Reads: SpaceX Edition #187.A version of this article appeared in the “Musk Reads” newsletter. .Musk quote of the week“Congratulations MHI & UAE!”What part of the Covid-19 pandemic do you think causes the most confusion? We want to know. SpaceX StarlinkStarlink, SpaceX’s internet connectivity constellation that promises high speeds and low latency in remote areas, is getting closer. Last week saw the unveiling of several key details after a website update. A new...

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Jul 21
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Study on over 17,000 Black women shows how racism changes the brain

Study on over 17,000 Black women shows how racism changes the brain

Mind and Body"The health costs are monumental."12 hours agoDecades of data show experiencing racism can wage a serious , jeopardize health, and even accelerate biological aging. Racism isn't just a social disease — it actually harms mental and physical well being over time. New , analyzing the cognitive function and everyday experiences of over 17,000 Black women, adds another harmful side effect to the list: cognitive deficits linked to racial discrimination. Racism can hamper brain function in detrimental and lasting ways, scientists report. Experiencing both daily and institutional...

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Jul 21
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Melting permafrost linked to impending environmental disaster — study

Melting permafrost linked to impending environmental disaster — study

5 hours agoScientists are worried about . When permanently frozen ground turns out to be not so permanent, structures built on permafrost can catastrophically — and the bizarre, ranging from abandoned to , can be revealed. Now, there's another issue to be concerned about: A massive release of carbon dioxide. In a natural effect called rhizosphere priming, the roots of plants accelerate the rate of decomposition in soil microbes — which, in turn, releases carbon dioxide. It's no small feature: This effect can increase decomposition fourfold. Still, current climate projections don't...

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Jul 20
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Cells die in 2 ways — scientists may have found a life-extending workaround

Cells die in 2 ways — scientists may have found a life-extending workaround

No buts about it, aging is a journey towards a universal destination: death. Though we all get there eventually, we don't always take the same route. New research suggests that there are two major highways the body usually takes towards that final destination. Its findings also suggest that, with intervention, we may soon open up a longer, scenic route that could extend the journey. Ultimately, aging is just a decline in the function of all the bits and pieces within your body. Protective caps on chromosomes shorten, muscle cells struggle to recover from damage, and DNA gains unwanted...

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Emma Betuel
Jul 16
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