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The New Yorker is an American weekly magazine featuring journalism, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally.Source
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Donald Trump Is Attacking American Democracy at Its Core

Donald Trump Is Attacking American Democracy at Its Core

One thing you cannot accuse of is trying to disguise his nefarious intentions. For months now, legal experts and Democratic campaign officials have warned that he may reject the results of this year’s election and pronounce himself the victor regardless of the vote tally. On Tuesday, Trump virtually confirmed that this is his plan. He also indicated that rushing through the appointment of another conservative to the Supreme Court is a key element of his strategy to stay in the White House.Before Trump flew to Pittsburgh for a super-spreader campaign rally, a pool reporter asked the...

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John Cassidy
2d ago
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The Legal Fight Awaiting Us After the Election

The Legal Fight Awaiting Us After the Election

The immediate aftermath of the has taken on the air of legend. On Election Night, news organizations first called Florida for —then, about two hours later, withdrew the call and, about four hours after that, declared that , the governor of Texas, had won the state, giving him enough electoral votes to become President. Gore called Bush to concede, and left his hotel in a motorcade to announce the end of his campaign to his supporters. His aides, learning that the race in Florida was, in fact, too close to call, tried frantically to contact the Vice-President in his limousine. They reached...

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Jeffrey Toobin
5d ago
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Two Hundred Thousand Americans Are Dead

Two Hundred Thousand Americans Are Dead

At some point in 1993, the two-hundred-thousandth American died of AIDS. By that time, a decade had passed since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the emergence of a mysterious new syndrome. Freddie Mercury and Arthur Ashe had died of the virus, and Magic Johnson had announced his retirement from the N.B.A. Tom Hanks was soon to win an Oscar for his role as an H.I.V.-positive gay man, in “Philadelphia.” Still, the tragic milestone passed without much notice. H.I.V. had become the among young American men, but researchers and activists were still fighting to raise awareness...

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Dhruv Khullar
5d ago
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The Man Who Refused to Spy

The Man Who Refused to Spy

In the spring of 2017, an Iranian materials scientist named Sirous Asgari received a call from the United States consulate in Dubai. Two years earlier, he and his wife, Fatemeh, had applied for visas to visit America, where their children lived. The consulate informed him that their requests had finally been approved. The timing was strange: had just issued an executive order banning Iranians from entering the U.S. on the very kind of visa that Asgari and his wife were granted. Maybe applications filed before the visa ban had been grandfathered through, or some career State Department...

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Laura Secor
Sep 14
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How the Promise of Normalcy Won the 1920 Election

How the Promise of Normalcy Won the 1920 Election

Here in stately, spacious Kalorama, a Washington, D.C., neighborhood less familiar and storied than nearby Georgetown, politics makes strange neighbors. Over on Tracy Place, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump occupy a large, charmless house whose chief selling point, one suspects, was its fuck-you proximity to the post-Presidential residence of Barack and Michelle Obama, several houses away, on Belmont Road.A short walk from either takes you to 2340 S Street, into which Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Wilson moved after leaving the White House, in March, 1921. Wilson’s successor, Ohio’s Senator Warren G....

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Thomas Mallon
Sep 14
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Is Russian Meddling as Dangerous as We Think?

Is Russian Meddling as Dangerous as We Think?

In the summer of 2017, Nina Jankowicz, a twenty-eight-year-old American, was working in Kyiv as a communications adviser to Ukraine’s foreign ministry as part of a yearlong Fulbright fellowship. Jankowicz had an interest in digital diplomacy and in countering disinformation that was matched by a passion for musical theatre: in Washington, D.C., where she lived for several years before moving to Ukraine, she played Sally in “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” and Audrey in “Little Shop of Horrors.”So when she came across a Facebook page for a White House protest that called on “resistance...

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Joshua Yaffa
Sep 7
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Slate Star Codex and Silicon Valley’s War Against the Media

Slate Star Codex and Silicon Valley’s War Against the Media

On June 22nd, visitors to Slate Star Codex, a long-standing blog of considerable influence, discovered that the site’s cerulean banner and graying WordPress design scheme had been superseded by a barren white layout. In the place of its usual catalogue of several million words of fiction, book reviews, essays, and miscellanea, as well as at least as voluminous an archive of reader commentary, was a single post of atypical brevity. “So,” it began, “I kind of deleted the blog. Sorry. Here’s my explanation.” The farewell post was attributed, like virtually all of the blog’s entries since its...

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Gideon Lewis-Kraus
Jul 9
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The Taste Makers

The Taste Makers

Growing up, Michelle Hagen lived near a large factory in Cincinnati that produced what she and her sisters called The Smell. The aroma was dynamic and unpredictable, almost like a living thing. On some hot summer days, it was thick and sweet, and when it drifted over Hagen’s neighborhood—a series of row houses by the interstate—it was as if molasses had been poured through the streets. At other times, the smell was protein-rich and savory. Many of the odors triggered specific associations—birthday cake, popcorn, chicken-noodle soup—and they stayed with her. In 1992, Hagen went to the...

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Raffi Khatchadourian
Nov 15
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Highlights from a “Princess Bride” Virtual Live Read

Highlights from a “Princess Bride” Virtual Live Read

“The Princess Bride,” being somehow foundational to Gen X, millennial, and Gen Z culture, is, for what seems like an overwhelming majority of people, never really far from mind. So, perhaps, it was inevitable, in this restless, screen-centric time, that someone would have the very good sense to orchestrate a virtual cast reunion. On Sunday night, from the relative safety of their individual homes, in who knows where, actors from the 1987 film came together via Webcam for a live-streamed reading of the script. (The event was a fund-raiser for the Democratic Party of Wisconsin; to gain access...

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Helen Rosner
Sep 14
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The Militias Against Masks

The Militias Against Masks

Early in the morning on May 11th, the neon “Open” sign in the front window of Karl Manke’s barbershop was dark. A crowd loitered in the parking lot. Spring had not yet arrived in Owosso, Michigan, a small town an hour and a half northwest of Detroit; people had on heavy coats and snow gloves, or sat in their trucks with the heater running. Michelle Gregoire, a twenty-nine-year-old school-bus driver and mother of three, looked unbothered by the cold. Wearing a light fleece jacket emblazoned with ’s name, she smiled and waved a “Don’t Tread on Me” flag at the passing traffic. She said of...

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Luke Mogelson
Aug 17
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How China Controlled the Coronavirus

How China Controlled the Coronavirus

Afew days before my return to classroom teaching at Sichuan University, I was biking across a deserted stretch of campus when I encountered a robot. The blocky machine stood about chest-high, on four wheels, not quite as long as a golf cart. In front was a T-shaped device that appeared to be some kind of sensor. The robot rolled past me, its electric motor humming. I turned around and tailed the thing at a distance of fifteen feet.It was May 27th, and it had been more than three months since my last visit to the university’s Jiang’an campus, which is on the outskirts of Chengdu, in...

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Peter Hessler
Aug 10
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Bob Woodward Finally Got Trump to Tell the Truth About COVID-19

Bob Woodward Finally Got Trump to Tell the Truth About COVID-19

President began the day on Wednesday engaged in a bout of self-promotion, dreaming of the Nobel Peace Prize he might soon win. Delighted with the news that a right-wing crank in the Norwegian parliament had nominated him for the honor, Trump had the White House press secretary put out an official statement that hailed the President’s “bold diplomacy and vision.” Before 10 A.M., Trump retweeted stories about the Nobel nomination—and congratulations to himself for it—nearly two dozen times. I would not be surprised if he took particular delight in the tweet he passed along from...

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Susan Glasser
Sep 10
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How My Mother and I Became Chinese Propaganda

How My Mother and I Became Chinese Propaganda

The messages wishing me a gruesome death arrive slowly at first and then all at once. I am condemned to be burned, raped, tortured. Some include a video of joyful dancing at a funeral, with fists pounding on a wooden casket. The hardest ones to read take aim at my mother, who has been immobilized by the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis since 2014. Most of the messages originate in China, but my mother and I live in New York. As the lockdown has swept the city, I find out that the health aides she depends on are to be banned from her facility and take to Twitter to...

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Jiayang Fan
Sep 7
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Miss America’s History-Makers and Rule-Breakers

Miss America’s History-Makers and Rule-Breakers

To the long-standing annoyance of people involved with the Miss America contest, which bills itself as “first, and foremost, a scholarship program,” the general public often confuses it with Miss U.S.A., which freely admits to being a beauty pageant. As annual tournaments of unmarried, childless women in their late teens and twenties, the two events have much in common. In fact, one emerged out of the other. In 1950, Yolande Betbeze, a convent-educated coloratura soprano from Mobile, Alabama, entered the Miss America contest and performed an aria from “Rigoletto” as her talent. She returned...

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Lauren Collins
Aug 31
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Can Biden’s Center Hold?

Can Biden’s Center Hold?

“Welcome to my mom’s house,” called from the bottom of the stairs, an instant before his sweep of white hair rose into view.The former Vice-President of the United States and the Democratic nominee for President reached the second floor of a cottage at the foot of his property in Greenville, Delaware, a wooded, well-to-do suburb of Wilmington. He wore a trim blue dress shirt, sleeves rolled to the elbows, a pen tucked between the buttons, and a bright-white N95 mask. It was ninety-nine days to the election. The death toll from the was approaching a hundred and fifty thousand, three times as...

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Evan Osnos
Aug 23
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Joe Biden, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the Shaky Unity of the Democratic National Convention | The New Yorker

Joe Biden, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the Shaky Unity of the Democratic National Convention | The New Yorker

On Day Two of the Democratic National Convention, the Party’s recent past kept ghosting in and out. Before the networks had even begun their broadcasts, the Party rolled through half a century of its own history: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter, from Georgia, and then Caroline Kennedy and her son in front of the unpainted shingles of a Cape Cod home, and, finally, , sitting on a flowered couch at his home in Chappaqua, New York. Clinton and form generational bookends—one moderate icon hailing another. But there was nothing especially historic, or historical, about Clinton’s praise of the nominee....

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Benjamin Wallace
Aug 19
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The Importance of the Post Office to American Democracy

The Importance of the Post Office to American Democracy

This November, record numbers of people are expected to vote by mail, in large part because of the . But a new Postmaster General, Louis DeJoy, recently made major cuts to the Postal Service, raising fears that Republicans are trying to defund the Post Office, delay deliveries, and cause late-arriving ballots to go uncounted in November. The Postal Service, which was experiencing delays even before the latest cuts, recently warned forty-six states that it may not be able to deliver ballots in time for them to be counted. And, last Thursday, in an interview on Fox Business Network, said...

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Isaac Chotiner
Aug 17
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As Newsrooms Close Across the Country, Remembering Why They Matter

As Newsrooms Close Across the Country, Remembering Why They Matter

Mortimer Matz, a New York press agent who turned ninety-six this summer, is one of the few people who remember what it was like to work at the Daily News in its glory days. Matz started at the News as a copyboy in 1949. When the photo assignment editor was called up to fight in Korea, Matz was promoted to take his place. Back then, the newspaper occupied several floors in an Art Deco skyscraper on East Forty-second Street. A bas-relief carving in the building’s granite street wall depicts a crowd of New Yorkers beneath the words “He Made So Many of Them.” The quote is attributed to Lincoln,...

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Tom Robbins
Aug 14
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Ellen DeGeneres’s Relatability Crisis

Ellen DeGeneres’s Relatability Crisis

“I’m a good person,” Ellen DeGeneres says in her standup special “Relatable,” which came out on Netflix at the end of 2018. “I know I am. But I’m a human being, and I have bad days.” This wasn’t an apology for some perceived offense but a mild pushback against her genial public persona, epitomized by DeGeneres’s sign-off on her daytime talk show: “Be kind to one another.” In “Relatable,” she says of the catchphrase, “It’s a wonderful thing, it is. But here’s the downside: I can never do anything unkind ever now. Ever. I’m the ‘be kind’ girl.”In the year and a half since, DeGeneres’s be-kind...

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Michael Schulman
Aug 7
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Trump’s Attack on the Postal Service Is a Threat to Democracy—and to Rural America

Trump’s Attack on the Postal Service Is a Threat to Democracy—and to Rural America

I’ve lived most of my life in small towns in pretty remote rural areas. Some were in red regions, some were purplish-blue—but every last one of them centered on the local post office. I remember years of picking up the mail from a little window in the postmaster’s living room. (If you called her the postmistress, she would tartly reply, “Uncle Sam can’t afford mistresses.”) Eventually, she needed her parlor back, to have room to work on her genealogy projects, so the community built a small freestanding building. Where I live now, the local post office takes up a third of the space in the...

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Bill McKibben
Aug 11
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How Suffering Farmers May Determine Trump’s Fate

How Suffering Farmers May Determine Trump’s Fate

Last October, Jerry Volenec, a dairy farmer from southwestern Wisconsin, took the morning off to go to Madison for the World Dairy Expo, an annual cattle-judging contest and trade show. Volenec wanted to hear a town-hall discussion led by Sonny Perdue, ’s Secretary of Agriculture, to learn how the Administration planned to address the economic crisis gripping Wisconsin’s family dairy farmers.Volenec’s farm sits atop Bohemian Ridge, a jagged plateau named for the Czech immigrants who settled there in the late nineteenth century. Among them was Joseph Volenec, Jerry’s great-great-grandfather,...

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Dan Kaufman
Aug 10
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North Dakota Oil Workers Are Learning to Tend Wind Turbines—and That’s a Big Deal

North Dakota Oil Workers Are Learning to Tend Wind Turbines—and That’s a Big Deal

“I enjoy big machinery, and it punched all those buttons,” Jay Johnson told me. “They really are big, and, if you like machinery, then there you go.” Johnson has one of the jobs that might, with luck, come to define our era. At Lake Region State College, in Devils Lake, North Dakota, he trains former oil workers for new careers maintaining giant wind turbines. The skills necessary for operating the derricks that frack for crude in the Bakken shale, he says, translate pretty directly into the skills required for operating the machines that convert the stiff winds of the high prairies into...

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Bill McKibben
Aug 6
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How to Counter Trump’s Attempt to Manipulate the Election and the Census

How to Counter Trump’s Attempt to Manipulate the Election and the Census

With the showing no signs of abating before November 3rd, Democrats and civil-rights groups are increasingly concerned that a slew of new mail-in voters will overwhelm states, leading to delayed counts and large numbers of rejected ballots. They are particularly about the role of the U.S. Postal Service. In May, the Republican-majority Postal Service Board of Governors appointed a new Postmaster General, a Trump campaign donor named Louis DeJoy, who made operational changes that appear to have led to slowed delivery. Meanwhile, the President has repeatedly attacked the reliability of...

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Isaac Chotiner
Aug 9
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The Woeful Inadequacy of School-Reopening Plans

The Woeful Inadequacy of School-Reopening Plans

School isn’t due to start in New York City until after Labor Day, but in Georgia some districts began opening last week, even though the state is averaging upward of three thousand new cases of COVID-19 a day—more than France, Germany, and the United Kingdom combined. Schools opened in Paulding County, outside Atlanta, despite there being an outbreak among members of a high-school football team. Students posted photographs of the first days of the term at the high school, showing teen-agers jammed in two-way corridor traffic, most of them without masks. Brian Otott, the county’s school...

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Amy Davidson Sorkin
Aug 9
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The Trump Campaign Tries to Change the Subject

The Trump Campaign Tries to Change the Subject

With less than three months to go until Election Day, Donald Trump’s campaign this week tried again to hit the reset button. “We’re going to run like we’re the underdog,” Trump’s new campaign manager, Bill Stepien, Fox News on Monday. Before Stepien spoke, the Trump team released two new television ads targeting Joe Biden, who, thus far, has proved an elusive foe. One of Biden with Senator Bernie Sanders and Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar, and claims that Biden “has embraced the policies of the radical left.” The other a woman of color silently holding up printed...

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John Cassidy
Aug 8
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