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Phys.org is a science, research and technology news aggregator where much of the content is republished directly from press releases and news agencies-in a practice known as churnalism. It also produces some science journalism.Source
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Not bot, not beast: Scientists create first ever living, programmable organism

Not bot, not beast: Scientists create first ever living, programmable organism

A remarkable combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and biology has produced the world's first "living robots". This week, a research team of roboticists and scientists published their recipe for making a new lifeform called xenobots from stem cells. The term "xeno" comes from the frog cells (Xenopus laevis) used to make them. One of the researchers described the creation as "neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal", but a "new class of artifact: a living, programmable organism". Xenobots are less than 1mm long and made of 500-1000 living cells. They have various...

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Mar 1
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What's in your water? Researchers identify new toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water

What's in your water? Researchers identify new toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water

January 28, 2020byMixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says Carsten Prasse from Johns Hopkins University and his collaborators from the University of California, Berkeley and Switzerland.The researchers' findings were published this past week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology."There's no doubt that chlorine is beneficial; chlorination has saved millions of lives worldwide from diseases such as typhoid and cholera since its arrival in the early 20th...

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Feb 11, 2020
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Smallest Homo erectus cranium in Africa and diverse stone tools found at Gona, Ethiopia

Smallest Homo erectus cranium in Africa and diverse stone tools found at Gona, Ethiopia

March 5, 2020by Jim Erickson,An international research team led by scientists from the U.S. and Spain, and including a University of Michigan geologist, has discovered a nearly complete cranium of an early human ancestor, estimated to about 1.5 million years ago, and a partial cranium dated to about 1.26 million years ago, from the Gona study area in Ethiopia's Afar State.Both crania, assigned to Homo erectus, were associated with simple Oldowan-type (Mode 1) and more complex Acheulian (Mode 2) stone tool assemblages. This suggests that H. erectus had a degree of cultural/behavioral...

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Mar 5, 2020
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Nanocontainers introduced into the nucleus of living cells

Nanocontainers introduced into the nucleus of living cells

January 27, 2020byAn interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel in Switzerland has succeeded in creating a direct path for artificial nanocontainers to enter into the nucleus of living cells. To this end, they produced biocompatible polymer vesicles that can pass through the pores that decorate the membrane of the cell nucleus. In this way, it might be possible to transport drugs directly into the cell's control center.In order to combat diseases, different therapies strive to intervene in pathological processes that occur in the . Chemotherapies, for example, target that are...

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Feb 11, 2020
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Northern Hemisphere faces 4-fold rise in extreme heat periods: study

Northern Hemisphere faces 4-fold rise in extreme heat periods: study

February 11, 2020by Patrick GaleyThe number of extreme hot days and nights in the Northern Hemisphere could quadruple by the end of the century even if humanity brings down emissions to meet the Paris climate deal goals, scientists said Tuesday.So-called compound hot extremes, 24-hour periods where daytime and nighttime temperatures stay exceptionally high, pose a significant risk to as the body doesn't get a chance to cool off after the Sun sets.Researchers in China analysed data from the Northern Hemisphere—home to 90 percent of humanity—stretching back to 1960.They found a clear upward...

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Feb 11, 2020
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'A wasted decade': Time left for climate action has shrunk two-thirds in 10 years

'A wasted decade': Time left for climate action has shrunk two-thirds in 10 years

March 5, 2020by"A wasted decade." That is how the past decade is called because of insufficient political action on climate change. It means that nations must now do four times the work—or do the same work in one-third of the time—to comply with the climate pact they made in Paris. These conclusions by Niklas Höhne (NewClimate Institute in Cologne and Wageningen University & Research), and international colleagues in a "Comment' in Nature are based on a synthesis of all ten editions of the Emissions Gap Report produced by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).Each year for the...

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Mar 5, 2020
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Media 'impartiality' on climate change is ethically misguided and downright dangerous

Media 'impartiality' on climate change is ethically misguided and downright dangerous

January 31, 2020by Denis Muller,In September 2019, the editor of The Conversation, Misha Ketchell, declared The Conversation's editorial team in Australia was henceforth taking what he called a "zero-tolerance" approach to climate change deniers and skeptics. Their comments would be blocked and their accounts locked.His reasons were succinct: "Climate change deniers and those shamelessly peddling pseudoscience and misinformation are perpetuating ideas that will ultimately destroy the planet."From the standpoint of conventional media ethics, it was a dramatic, even shocking, decision. It...

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Feb 11, 2020
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Rats avoid hurting other rats

Rats avoid hurting other rats

March 5, 2020by Netherlands Institute for NeuroscienceMost humans feel bad about hurting others. This so-called "harm aversion" is key to normal moral development and is reduced in violent antisocial individuals. Unfortunately, little is known about what makes people harm-averse, and medical practitioners lack effective pharmacological treatments for violence in psychopathic criminals characterized by a lack of harm aversion.In a new paper published in Current Biology, a team of neuroscientists of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) shows that male and show harm aversion. This...

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Mar 5, 2020
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Ocean changes almost starved life of oxygen

Ocean changes almost starved life of oxygen

March 2, 2020byChemical changes in the oceans more than 800 million years ago almost destroyed the oxygen-rich atmosphere that paved the way for complex life on Earth, new research suggests.Then, as now, the planet had an "oxidizing" atmosphere, driven by phytoplankton—the "plants" of the ocean—releasing oxygen during photosynthesis.However, new research from an international team including the University of Exeter and spanning Toulouse, Leeds, London and Nanjing, suggests ocean changes in the early Neoproterozoic era (from one billion to 800 million years ago) may have locked away...

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Mar 5, 2020
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Himalayan glacier shows evidence of start of Industrial Revolution

Himalayan glacier shows evidence of start of Industrial Revolution

February 10, 2020by Laura Arenschield,Human beings altered one of the highest peaks in the Himalayas hundreds of years before a person ever set foot there, new research has found.The study, publishing today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicates that the byproducts of burning coal in Europe in the late 18th century made their way to the Dasuopu glacier in the central Himalayas, some 6,400 miles as the crow flies from London, the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution."The Industrial Revolution was a revolution in the use of energy," said Paolo Gabrielli, lead...

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Feb 11, 2020
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