CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
0 reviews
RECENT ARTICLES
NO RATING
Gender differences in COVID-19 attitudes and behavior: Panel evidence from eight countries

Gender differences in COVID-19 attitudes and behavior: Panel evidence from eight countries

Edited by Douglas S. Massey, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved September 2, 2020 (received for review June 17, 2020)Public health response to COVID-19 requires behavior changes—isolation at home, wearing masks. Its effectiveness depends on generalized compliance. Original data from two waves of a survey conducted in March−April 2020 in eight Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries (n = 21,649) show large gender differences in COVID-19−related beliefs and behaviors. Women are more likely to perceive the pandemic as a very serious health problem and to...

pnas.org
6d ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
The rise of COVID-19 cases is associated with support for world leaders

The rise of COVID-19 cases is associated with support for world leaders

Edited by Susan T. Fiske, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved August 23, 2020 (received for review May 8, 2020)Amid the present COVID-19 pandemic, we find that many citizens around the world “rally ‘round the flag” and increase their support for their respective political leaders. We observe these findings among countries that are culturally and geographically diverse, and even among leaders who are strongly disliked by citizens prior to the pandemic. Our findings could have important voting implications during or immediately after the pandemic. As an example, the Korean...

pnas.org
Oct 13
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Annually resolved Atlantic sea surface temperature variability over the past 2,900 y

Annually resolved Atlantic sea surface temperature variability over the past 2,900 y

Edited by Bernd Zolitschka, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany, and accepted by Editorial Board Member Jean Jouzel September 11, 2020 (received for review July 6, 2020)Atlantic multidecadal sea surface temperature variability (AMV) strongly influences the Northern Hemisphere’s climate, including the Arctic. Here using a well-dated annually laminated lake sediment core, we show that the AMV exerts a strong influence on High-Arctic climate during the instrumental period (past ∼150 y) through atmospheric teleconnection. This highly resolved climate archive is then used to produce the first...

pnas.org
Oct 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Sociopolitical stress and acute cardiovascular disease hospitalizations around the 2016 presidential election

Sociopolitical stress and acute cardiovascular disease hospitalizations around the 2016 presidential election

Contributed by David R. Williams, August 25, 2020 (sent for review June 16, 2020; reviewed by Susan Everson-Rose, Jay S. Kaufman, and Herman Taylor)Previous studies have shown a transiently higher risk of acute cardiovascular disease (CVD) events within minutes to hours after behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental triggers. Research is limited examining acute CVD surrounding sociopolitical events. We compared hospitalization rates for acute CVD before and immediately after the date of the 2016 presidential election among patients in an integrated healthcare delivery system. The rate of...

pnas.org
Oct 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Economic hardship and mental health complaints during COVID-19

Economic hardship and mental health complaints during COVID-19

Edited by Douglas S. Massey, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved September 16, 2020 (received for review May 13, 2020)This study measures the impact of the COVID-19 lockdowns on workers’ economic hardship and mental health. In data representative of the active labor force, we document two interconnected layers of rapidly exacerbating inequalities. We find that occupational ranking is highly predictive of experiencing a range of instant economic hardships, such as workload decrease and income loss. Subsequent analyses indicate that such economic hardships lead to much higher...

pnas.org
Oct 12
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Seasonality and uncertainty in global COVID-19 growth rates

Seasonality and uncertainty in global COVID-19 growth rates

Edited by Nils Chr. Stenseth, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, and approved September 16, 2020 (received for review May 1, 2020)The virus causing COVID-19 has spread rapidly worldwide. It remains unknown whether summer weather will reduce its spread and justify relaxing political interventions and restarting economic activities. We develop statistical models that predict the maximum potential of COVID-19 worldwide and throughout the year. We find that UV light, in particular, is associated with decreased disease growth rate relative to other analyzed factors. Based on these associations...

pnas.org
Oct 13
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
The turning point and end of an expanding epidemic cannot be precisely forecast

The turning point and end of an expanding epidemic cannot be precisely forecast

Edited by Eugene V. Koonin, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and approved September 11, 2020 (received for review April 23, 2020)Susceptible–infected–removed (SIR) models and their extensions are widely used to describe the dynamics of infection spreading. Certain generic features of epidemics are well-illustrated by these models, which can be remarkably good at reproducing empirical data through suitably chosen parameters. However, this does not assure a good job anticipating the forthcoming stages of the process. To illustrate this point, we accurately describe the propagation...

pnas.org
Oct 1
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
America’s electorate is increasingly polarized along partisan lines about voting by mail during the COVID-19 crisis

America’s electorate is increasingly polarized along partisan lines about voting by mail during the COVID-19 crisis

Edited by Douglas S. Massey, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved August 24, 2020 (received for review April 24, 2020)Are voters as polarized as political leaders when it comes to their preferences about how to cast their ballots in November 2020 and their policy positions on how elections should be run in light of the COVID-19 outbreak? Prior research has shown little party divide on voting by mail, with nearly equal percentages of voters in both parties choosing to vote this way where it is an option. Has a divide opened up this year in how voters aligned with the Democratic...

pnas.org
Oct 6
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Political partisanship influences behavioral responses to governors’ recommendations for COVID-19 prevention in the United States

Political partisanship influences behavioral responses to governors’ recommendations for COVID-19 prevention in the United States

Edited by Margaret Levi, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved August 4, 2020 (received for review April 22, 2020)We examine the role of partisanship in engagement in physical distancing following the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19 in the United States. We use data on daily mobility patterns for US counties along with information on county-level political preferences and the timing of state government leaders’ recommendations for individuals to stay at home. We find that state government leaders’ recommendations were more effective in reducing mobility in...

pnas.org
Sep 29
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
The origin and diversification of pteropods precede past perturbations in the Earth’s carbon cycle

The origin and diversification of pteropods precede past perturbations in the Earth’s carbon cycle

Edited by John P. Huelsenbeck, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and accepted by Editorial Board Member David Jablonski August 19, 2020 (received for review November 27, 2019)Pteropods are abundant aragonitic calcifiers, contributing up to 89% of total pelagic calcification. Because of their delicate shells, they are considered “canaries in the coalmine” to indicate impacts of ocean acidification. Their sensitivity to high CO2 levels and limited fossil record has led to the widely held view that pteropods only became abundant after the PETM. Based on phylogenomic analyses, we show...

pnas.org
Sep 24
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
The rise of COVID-19 cases is associated with support for world leaders

The rise of COVID-19 cases is associated with support for world leaders

Edited by Susan T. Fiske, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved August 23, 2020 (received for review May 8, 2020)Amid the present COVID-19 pandemic, we find that many citizens around the world “rally ‘round the flag” and increase their support for their respective political leaders. We observe these findings among countries that are culturally and geographically diverse, and even among leaders who are strongly disliked by citizens prior to the pandemic. Our findings could have important voting implications during or immediately after the pandemic. As an example, the Korean...

pnas.org
Sep 24
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Organic matter from the Chicxulub crater exacerbated the K–Pg impact winter

Organic matter from the Chicxulub crater exacerbated the K–Pg impact winter

Edited by Mark Thiemens, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, and approved August 24, 2020 (received for review March 11, 2020)This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased.Burn markers are observed in many records of the Cretaceous–Paleogene asteroid impact and mass extinction event. These materials could be derived from wildfires on land or from sedimentary rocks hit by the asteroid. We present a detailed record of molecular burn markers...

pnas.org
Sep 23
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Maximizing the value of forest restoration for tropical mammals by detecting three-dimensional habitat associations

Maximizing the value of forest restoration for tropical mammals by detecting three-dimensional habitat associations

Edited by Arun Agrawal, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, and approved July 28, 2020 (received for review February 4, 2020)Forest restoration has become a global conservation priority, particularly in the tropics where a significant proportion of remaining forest ecosystems are degraded. To achieve ambitious restoration targets via limited conservation funds, areas that will deliver the greatest biodiversity value must be prioritized. Here, we combine airborne laser scanning with an extensive camera trap dataset to target conservation and restoration across a degraded logged forest...

pnas.org
Sep 23
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Speech can produce jet-like transport relevant to asymptomatic spreading of virus

Speech can produce jet-like transport relevant to asymptomatic spreading of virus

Edited by Parviz Moin, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved August 27, 2020 (received for review June 12, 2020)Medical reports and news sources raise the possibility that flows created during breathing, speaking, laughing, singing, or exercise could be the means by which asymptomatic individuals contribute to spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. We use experiments and simulations to quantify how exhaled air is transported in speech. Phonetic characteristics introduce complexity to the airflow dynamics and plosive sounds, such as “P,” produce intense vortical structures that behave...

pnas.org
Sep 25
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Assessing the ecological niche and invasion potential of the Asian giant hornet

Assessing the ecological niche and invasion potential of the Asian giant hornet

Edited by Carl Folke, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, and approved August 15, 2020 (received for review June 3, 2020)The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia) was recently detected in western British Columbia, Canada and Washington State, United States. V. mandarinia are an invasion concern due to their ability to kill honey bees and affect humans. Here, we used habitat suitability models and dispersal simulations to assess potential invasive spread of V. mandarinia. We show V. mandarinia are most likely to establish in areas with warm to cool annual mean temperature,...

pnas.org
Sep 22
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Transmission dynamics reveal the impracticality of COVID-19 herd immunity strategies

Transmission dynamics reveal the impracticality of COVID-19 herd immunity strategies

Edited by Alan Hastings, University of California, Davis, CA, and approved August 27, 2020 (received for review April 26, 2020)Confronted with escalating COVID-19 outbreaks, countries at the leading edge of the pandemic have had to resort to imposing drastic social distancing measures which have serious societal and economic repercussions. Establishing herd immunity in a population by allowing the epidemic to spread, while mitigating the negative health impacts of COVID-19, presents a tantalizing resolution to the crisis. Our study simulating SARS-CoV-2 spread in the United Kingdom finds...

pnas.org
Sep 22
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Circulation of gut-preactivated naïve CD8+ T cells enhances antitumor immunity in B cell-defective mice

Circulation of gut-preactivated naïve CD8+ T cells enhances antitumor immunity in B cell-defective mice

Contributed by Tasuku Honjo, July 31, 2020 (sent for review May 30, 2020; reviewed by Daisuke Kitamura and Di Yu)This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased.Accumulating evidence supports important roles for the microbiota in health and disease. The absence of IgA induces microbial dysbiosis, leading to inflammation in the gut environment. Here, we found that the strong antitumor immunity of B cell-deficient mice is due to their microbial dysbiosis,...

pnas.org
Sep 22
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
The 17-y spatiotemporal trend of PM2.5 and its mortality burden in China

The 17-y spatiotemporal trend of PM2.5 and its mortality burden in China

Edited by George F. Gao, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China, and approved August 15, 2020 (received for review November 8, 2019)This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased.Estimation of the chronic health effects of PM2.5 exposure has been hindered by the lack of long-term PM2.5 data in China. To support this, high-performance machine-learning models were developed to estimate PM2.5 concentrations at 1-km resolution in...

pnas.org
Sep 16
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Treatment of mental illness in American adolescents varies widely within and across areas

Treatment of mental illness in American adolescents varies widely within and across areas

Contributed by Janet Currie, August 6, 2020 (sent for review April 20, 2020; reviewed by Jay Bhattacharya, Jonathan Gruber, and Jonathan Skinner)This study uses a large national database of insured adolescent children who have an initial insurance claim for a mental illness. Many of these children either fail to receive follow-up care within 3 mo, or receive care that appears to fall short of standard guidelines for the initial treatment of mental illness in children. The majority do not receive therapy, and many children receive drugs that raise a red flag, such as benzodiazepines,...

pnas.org
Sep 16
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Microbial biomarkers reveal a hydrothermally active landscape at Olduvai Gorge at the dawn of the Acheulean, 1.7 Ma

Microbial biomarkers reveal a hydrothermally active landscape at Olduvai Gorge at the dawn of the Acheulean, 1.7 Ma

Edited by Thure E. Cerling, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, and approved August 14, 2020 (received for review April 10, 2020)This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased.Molecular fossil biomarkers illuminate a geothermally active oasis landscape at Olduvai Gorge 1.7 Ma at the emergence of the Acheulean technology. This study on the local paleolandscape reveals a mosaic ecosystem with great biodiversity, rivers, edible resources, and...

pnas.org
Sep 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Plants sense temperature with help of elegant protein | National Academy of Sciences

Plants sense temperature with help of elegant protein | National Academy of Sciences

Work in Arabidopsis thaliana plants demonstrates that at high temperatures, an active version of the protein ELF3 suppresses flowering (left). An inactive version, with a region resembling a prion, allows for flowering (right). Image credit: Philip WiggeHow plants sense temperature is a longstanding and little-understood question. Researchers have discovered some of the mechanisms involved. A recent in Nature adds a new mechanism—among the first in which the biophysical behavior of a single protein regulates the temperature response of the entire plant, says coauthor Philip Wigge, a plant...

pnas.org
Sep 19
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Restoration of fragmentary Babylonian texts using recurrent neural networks

Restoration of fragmentary Babylonian texts using recurrent neural networks

Edited by Emilie Pagé-Perron, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, and accepted by Editorial Board Member Elsa M. Redmond July 7, 2020 (received for review February 27, 2020)This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased.The documentary sources for the political, economic, and social history of ancient Mesopotamia constitute hundreds of thousands of clay tablets inscribed in the cuneiform script. Most tablets are damaged, leaving gaps in the texts...

pnas.org
Sep 15
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Open science, communal culture, and women’s participation in the movement to improve science

Open science, communal culture, and women’s participation in the movement to improve science

Edited by Susan T. Fiske, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved July 27, 2020 (received for review December 7, 2019)Science is rapidly changing with the current movement to improve science focused largely on reproducibility/replicability and open science practices. Through network modeling and semantic analysis, this article provides an initial exploration of the structure, cultural frames of collaboration and prosociality, and representation of women in the open science and reproducibility literatures. Network analyses reveal that the open science and reproducibility...

pnas.org
Sep 9
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
Late lactation in small mammals is a critically sensitive window of vulnerability to elevated ambient temperature

Late lactation in small mammals is a critically sensitive window of vulnerability to elevated ambient temperature

Contributed by John R. Speakman, July 27, 2020 (sent for review May 6, 2020; reviewed by Kimberly Hammond and Craig R. White)This article requires a subscription to view the full text. If you have a subscription you may use the login form below to view the article. Access to this article can also be purchased.Models of future climate change have tended to focus on changes in average temperature, which in physiological terms are relatively trivial. Of more physiological importance is the future elevated risk of heat waves. We show here that during peak lactation in two species of small...

pnas.org
Sep 9
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
NO RATING
An artificial aquatic polyp that wirelessly attracts, grasps, and releases objects

An artificial aquatic polyp that wirelessly attracts, grasps, and releases objects

Edited by David A. Weitz, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved June 17, 2020 (received for review March 12, 2020)Wirelessly controlled, multitasking soft devices active in aqueous environments are highly required for applications in microfluidics and organ-on-a-chip and as medical devices. Inspired by marine organisms, we present an approach to achieve such devices by utilizing stimuli-responsive material assemblies capable of untethered object manipulation in an enclosed aqueous environment. Our soft robot assembly integrates a magnetically controlled stem with a...

pnas.org
Jul 28
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
AUTHORS