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‘We’ve done nothing wrong.’ EcoHealth leader fights charges that his research helped spark COVID-19

‘We’ve done nothing wrong.’ EcoHealth leader fights charges that his research helped spark COVID-19

Peter Daszak’s life took a turn for the worse on the evening of 17 April 2020. It has yet to recover. Daszak, a conservation biologist, heads the EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit research group based in New York City that aims to prevent new infectious diseases from emerging. His family had been in a COVID-19 lockdown in their home outside the city for 1 month, and Daszak had spent long days working from a wood-paneled basement office, occasionally giving interviews as a pandemic expert. That Friday evening, he went upstairs for a cup of tea with his wife, who was in the kitchen watching a...

Nov 24
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Ice shelf holding back keystone Antarctic glacier within years of failure

Ice shelf holding back keystone Antarctic glacier within years of failure

An alarming crackup has begun at the foot of Antarctica’s vulnerable Thwaites Glacier, whose meltwater is already responsible for about 4% of global sea level rise. An ice sheet the size of Florida, Thwaites ends its slide into the ocean as a floating ledge of ice 45 kilometers wide. But now, this ice shelf, riven by newly detected fissures on its surface and underside, is likely to break apart in the next 5 years or so, scientists reported today at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union. The most dramatic sign of impending failure is a set of diagonal fractures that nearly span the...

Dec 15
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Use of ‘too hot’ climate models exaggerates impacts of global warming

Use of ‘too hot’ climate models exaggerates impacts of global warming

One study suggests Arctic rainfall will become dominant in the 2060s, decades earlier than expected. Another claims air pollution from forest fires in the western United States could triple by 2100. A third says a mass ocean extinction could arrive in just a few centuries. All three studies, published in the past year, rely on projections of the future produced by some of the world’s next-generation climate models. But even the modelmakers acknowledge that many of these models have a glaring problem: predicting a future that gets too hot too fast. Although modelmakers are adapting to this...

May 4
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Paul Voosen

Paul Voosen

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Jon Cohen

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