sciencemag.org
sciencemag.org
Science, also widely referred to as Science Magazine, is the peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and one of the world's top academic journals. It was first published in 1880, is currently circulated weekly and has a subscriber base of around 130,000. Because institutional subscriptions and online access serve a larger audience, its estimated readership is 570,400 people.Source
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Ease restrictions on U.S. blood donations

Ease restrictions on U.S. blood donations

Unnecessary restrictions on blood donors should be removed to maximize the blood and plasma available for use.PHOTO: ISTOCK.COM/CGDEAWWith a vaccine for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) likely more than a year away, we must identify effective therapies for patients now. One promising approach is the use of plasma from patients who have recovered from COVID-19 (, ). To facilitate this strategy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently revised some of the restrictions on blood donation, including a decrease in deferral time for men who have sex with men (MSM) to 3 months ()....

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1The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience
1d ago
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Samples from famed 19th century voyage reveal ‘shocking’ effects of ocean acidification

Samples from famed 19th century voyage reveal ‘shocking’ effects of ocean acidification

Not everyone would consider 150-year-old plankton specimens a treasure with “cutting-edge” research potential. But that’s precisely what Lyndsey Fox thought when she discovered a cache of single-celled, shell-building foraminifera deep in storage at London’s Museum of Natural History. Now, the Kingston University micropaleontologist and colleagues have shown that the samples, collected during the pioneering 1872–76 expedition of the HMS Challenger, hold valuable insights about modern-day climate change: Their shells are far thicker than those of today’s foraminifera, which are thinning in...

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NewsfromScience
Feb 3
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This spider turns its web into a slingshot, flinging itself at prey

This spider turns its web into a slingshot, flinging itself at prey

When we think of how spiders hunt, we usually picture intricate webs that can ensnare passing insects. But the triangle weaver spider (Hyptiotes cavatus)—native to the United States and Canada—does something special: It creates a slingshot with its silk web to catapult itself forward and capture its prey.To watch the spiders at work, scientists recorded them using high-speed videos. They saw that the arachnids stretch and tighten their silk threads, using their body as a bridge between the anchor line and the web (as seen in the photo above) and can hold the web under tension for hours on...

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NewsfromScience
May 13
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Eye-catching advances in some AI fields are not real

Eye-catching advances in some AI fields are not real

Artificial intelligence (AI) just seems to get smarter and smarter. Each iPhone learns your face, voice, and habits better than the last, and the threats AI poses to privacy and jobs continue to grow. The surge reflects faster chips, more data, and better algorithms. But some of the improvement comes from tweaks rather than —and some of the gains may not exist at all, says Davis Blalock, a computer science graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Blalock and his colleagues compared dozens of approaches to improving neural networks—software architectures that...

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NewsfromScience
3d ago
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Sumatran rhinoceros on the brink of extinction

Sumatran rhinoceros on the brink of extinction

You are currently viewing the pdf extract.AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.Log in via OpenAthens.Log in with your institution via Shibboleth.Download and print this article for your personal scholarly, research, and educational use.Buy a single issue of Science for just $15 USD.You do not have access to the full text of this article, the first page of the of this article appears above.Vol 368, Issue 649429 May 2020Vol 368, Issue 6494© 2020 . All rights reserved....

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1Henan Agricultural University
1d ago
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Mysterious radio bursts reveal missing matter in cosmos

Mysterious radio bursts reveal missing matter in cosmos

Roughly half of the “normal” matter in the universe—the stuff that makes up stars, planets, and even us—exists as mere wisps of material floating in intergalactic space, according to cosmologists. But astronomers had no good way to confirm that, until now. A new study has used fast radio bursts (FRBs)—powerful millisecondslong pulses of radio waves coming from distant galaxies—to weigh intergalactic matter, and the results match up with predictions.“Using FRBs as a probe has been an exciting prospect for a while,” says astronomer Paul Scholz of the University of Toronto, who was not...

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NewsfromScience
3d ago
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Long-acting drug acts like a short-term AIDS vaccine

Long-acting drug acts like a short-term AIDS vaccine

AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.Log in via OpenAthens.Log in with your institution via Shibboleth.Download and print this article for your personal scholarly, research, and educational use.Buy a single issue of Science for just $15 USD.Vol 368, Issue 649322 May 2020Vol 368, Issue 6493© 2020 . All rights reserved. AAAS is a partner of , , , , ,  and .Science ISSN 1095-9203.

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May 22
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The extracellular matrix protein TasA is a developmental cue that maintains a motile subpopulation within Bacillus subtilis biofilms

The extracellular matrix protein TasA is a developmental cue that maintains a motile subpopulation within Bacillus subtilis biofilms

During biofilm formation, bacterial cells switch from a motile planktonic state to a matrix-producing, adherent state. Although bacterial biofilms are generally sessile, some, such as those formed by Bacillus subtilis, can spread to overtake and kill neighboring colonies of competitor species. Steinberg et al. found that a motile subpopulation of cells within B. subtilis biofilms was required for the biofilms to spread over foreign objects. This process required the matrix protein TasA, which stimulated a subset of cells within the biofilm to revert from a matrix-producing state to a motile...

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1Department of Molecular Genetics
May 19
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IRF5 guides monocytes toward an inflammatory CD11c+ macrophage phenotype and promotes intestinal inflammation

IRF5 guides monocytes toward an inflammatory CD11c+ macrophage phenotype and promotes intestinal inflammation

Intestinal homeostasis relies on maintenance of a complex set of interactions between intestinal microbiota and the intestinal immune system. Pathogens that colonize the gut invariably disrupt these interactions and promote intestinal inflammation. Here, Corbin et al. have used a mouse pathobiont, Helicobacter hepaticus, that causes inflammation akin to human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to study the role of intestinal macrophages in driving inflammation. Using this model, they found the transcription factor IRF5 to be a critical regulator of macrophage inflammatory potential and that...

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1Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology
May 22
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T cells with dysfunctional mitochondria induce multimorbidity and premature senescence

T cells with dysfunctional mitochondria induce multimorbidity and premature senescence

AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.Log in via OpenAthens.Log in with your institution via Shibboleth.Download and print this article for your personal scholarly, research, and educational use.Buy a single issue of Science for just $15 USD.Vol 368, Issue 6493© 2020 . All rights reserved. AAAS is a partner of , , , , ,  and .Science ISSN 1095-9203.

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1Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12)
May 21
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O-GlcNAc transferase promotes influenza A virus–induced cytokine storm by targeting interferon regulatory factor–5

O-GlcNAc transferase promotes influenza A virus–induced cytokine storm by targeting interferon regulatory factor–5

In this study, we demonstrated an essential function of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP)–associated O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) signaling in influenza A virus (IAV)–induced cytokine storm. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), a key enzyme for protein O-GlcNAcylation, mediated IAV-induced cytokine production. Upon investigating the mechanisms driving this event, we determined that IAV induced OGT to bind to interferon regulatory factor–5 (IRF5), leading to O-GlcNAcylation of IRF5 on serine-430. O-GlcNAcylation of IRF5 is required for K63-linked ubiquitination of IRF5 and...

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1College of Bioscience
Apr 1
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The origin of domestication genes in goats

The origin of domestication genes in goats

You are using an old browser, click here to download PDF PDF ContainerVol 6, No. 2120 May 2020Vol 368, Issue 6493© 2020 . All rights reserved. AAAS is a partner of , , , , ,  and .Science Advances ISSN 2375-2548.

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1Key Laboratory of Animal Genetics
May 1
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Court rules ‘Dueling Dinos’ belong to landowners, in a win for science

Court rules ‘Dueling Dinos’ belong to landowners, in a win for science

A legal saga that threatened to upend fossil hunting in dinosaur-rich Montana has drawn to a close, and paleontologists are breathing a sigh of relief.The Montana Supreme Court this week  that fossils are not legally the same as minerals such as gold or copper. Therefore, Montana fossils, including a dramatic specimen of two dinosaurs buried together, belong to people who own the land where they are found, rather than to the owners of the minerals underneath that land.The 4-3 decision upholds the way U.S. scientists have long approached questions of fossil ownership. It appears to defuse a...

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NewsfromScience
May 22
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Bumble bees damage plant leaves and accelerate flower production when pollen is scarce

Bumble bees damage plant leaves and accelerate flower production when pollen is scarce

You are currently viewing the abstract.AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.Log in via OpenAthens.Log in with your institution via Shibboleth.Download and print this article for your personal scholarly, research, and educational use.Buy a single issue of Science for just $15 USD.Bumble bees rely heavily on pollen resources for essential nutrients as they build their summer colonies. Therefore, we might expect that annual differences in the availability of these...

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1Department of Environmental Systems Sciences
May 22
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Horizontal gene transfer of Fhb7 from fungus underlies Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

Horizontal gene transfer of Fhb7 from fungus underlies Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by a fungus, reduces wheat crop yield and introduces toxins into the harvest. From the assembly of the genome of Thinopyrum elongatum, a wild relative of wheat used in breeding programs to improve cultivated wheat, Wang et al. cloned a gene that can address both problems (see the Perspective by Wulff and Jones). The encoded glutathione S-transferase detoxifies the trichothecene toxin and, when expressed in wheat, confers resistance to FHB.Science, this issue p. ; see also p. Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a fungal disease that devastates global wheat...

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1State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology
May 22
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SARS-CoV-2 infection protects against rechallenge in rhesus macaques

SARS-CoV-2 infection protects against rechallenge in rhesus macaques

An understanding of protective immunity to SARS-CoV-2 is critical for vaccine and public health strategies aimed at ending the global COVID-19 pandemic. A key unanswered question is whether infection with SARS-CoV-2 results in protective immunity against re-exposure. We developed a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection and observed that macaques had high viral loads in the upper and lower respiratory tract, humoral and cellular immune responses, and pathologic evidence of viral pneumonia. Following initial viral clearance, animals were rechallenged with SARS-CoV-2 and showed 5 log10...

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1Center for Virology
May 20
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Buckyball sandwiches

Buckyball sandwiches

Two-dimensional (2D) materials have considerably expanded the field of materials science in the past decade. Even more recently, various 2D materials have been assembled into vertical van der Waals heterostacks, and it has been proposed to combine them with other low-dimensional structures to create new materials with hybridized properties. We demonstrate the first direct images of a suspended 0D/2D heterostructure that incorporates C60 molecules between two graphene layers in a buckyball sandwich structure. We find clean and ordered C60 islands with thicknesses down to one molecule,...

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Faculty of Physics
Jun 1
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COVID-19 shot protects monkeys

COVID-19 shot protects monkeys

's COVID-19 coverage is supported by the Pulitzer Center.Sinovac Biotech has created a vaccine by growing the novel coronavirus in Vero monkey cells and inactivating it.PHOTO: XINHUA/ALAMY STOCK PHOTOFor the first time, one of the many COVID-19 vaccines in development has protected an animal, rhesus macaques, from the new coronavirus. The vaccine, an old-fashioned formulation consisting of a chemically inactivated version of the virus, produced no obvious side effects in the monkeys; human trials began on 16 April. And encouraging monkey results for other vaccines are close...

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May 1
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Structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from COVID-19 virus

Structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from COVID-19 virus

Many in the scientific community have mobilized to understand the virus that is causing the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Gao et al. focused on a complex that plays a key role in the replication and transcription cycle of the virus. They used cryo–electron microscopy to determine a 2.9-angstrom-resolution structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase nsp12, which catalyzes the synthesis of viral RNA, in complex with two cofactors, nsp7 and nsp8. nsp12 is a target for nucleotide analog antiviral inhibitors such as remdesivir, and the structure may provide a basis for...

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1Laboratory of Structural Biology
May 15
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World’s biggest volcano is barely visible

World’s biggest volcano is barely visible

Science’s extensive COVID-19 coverage is free to all readers. To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today.Two small, guano-covered islands that peek above the waves in the central North Pacific Ocean are merely the tips of our planet’s largest single volcano, new research reveals.Pūhāhonu—Hawaiian for “turtle surfacing for air”—lies about 1100 kilometers northwest of Honolulu. It is a shield volcano—a broad dome that rises about 4500 meters from the sea floor from a single source of molten rock. In an analysis reported this month in Earth and...

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NewsfromScience
May 12
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The death-inducing activity of RIPK1 is regulated by the pH environment

The death-inducing activity of RIPK1 is regulated by the pH environment

AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.Log in via OpenAthens.Log in with your institution via Shibboleth.Download and print this article for your personal scholarly, research, and educational use.Buy a single issue of Science for just $15 USD.Vol 13, Issue 63112 May 2020Vol 368, Issue 6492© 2020 . All rights reserved. AAAS is a partner of , , , , ,  and .Science Signaling ISSN 1937-9145.

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1Department of Pathology
May 12
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Thief ants steal—and eat—the young of other ants, decimating their populations

Thief ants steal—and eat—the young of other ants, decimating their populations

Science’s extensive COVID-19 coverage is free to all readers. To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today.Even ants have to deal with pests. One of those is the pesky, poppy seedsize thief ant, which steals and eats the young of larger ants. A new study reveals such foraging exacts a heavy toll on other ant species, with damage so severe it can cascade up the entire food chain.“It’s just staggering,” says Andrea Lucky, an ant systematist at the University of Florida, who was not involved with the work, but who now advises the author of the paper....

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NewsfromScience
May 15
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Saber-toothed anchovies roamed the oceans 45 million years ago

Saber-toothed anchovies roamed the oceans 45 million years ago

Science’s extensive COVID-19 coverage is free to all readers. To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today.When dinosaurs and other large predators went extinct some 66 million years ago, lots of creatures evolved to take their place. But unlike the plankton-hunting anchovies we eat in Caesar salads today, some ancient anchovies evolved into fish-eating predators, according to a new study.Researchers examined a 30-centimeter-long fossil embedded in a rock formation near Chièvres, Belgium, and another partial fossil from Pakistan’s Punjab province....

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NewsfromScience
May 12
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Video: Hoverflies 'Shift Gears' to Fly

Video: Hoverflies 'Shift Gears' to Fly

Science’s extensive COVID-19 coverage is free to all readers. To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today.Dissect the hoverfly (also known as the Syrphidae family), and where the wing meets the body of this small brown insect, you'll find a tangle of tiny muscular bands and cogs forming one of the most complex hinge mechanisms known to biology. The actual mechanics of this transmission system have been impossible to observe, however, since they move inside the insect's body. Now, using a high-speed camera, researchers have filmed the wingbeats of...

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NewsfromScience
Nov 9
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From Black Death to fatal flu, past pandemics show why people on the margins suffer most

From Black Death to fatal flu, past pandemics show why people on the margins suffer most

Science’s extensive COVID-19 coverage is free to all readers. To support our nonprofit science journalism, please make a tax-deductible gift today.When the Black Death arrived in London by January 1349, the city had been waiting with dread for months. Londoners had heard reports of devastation from cities such as Florence, where 60% of people had died of plague the year before. In the summer of 1348, the disease had reached English ports from continental Europe and begun to ravage its way toward the capital. The plague caused painful and frightening symptoms, including fever, vomiting,...

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NewsfromScience
May 14
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