sciencenews.org
sciencenews.org
Science News (SN) is an American bi-weekly magazine devoted to short articles about new scientific and technical developments, typically gleaned from recent scientific and technical journals. Science News has been published since 1922 by Society for Science & the Public, a non-profit organization founded by E. W. Scripps in 1920.Source
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Earth’s annual e-waste could grow to 75 million metric tons by 2030

Earth’s annual e-waste could grow to 75 million metric tons by 2030

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueThe planet’s hefty pile of discarded electronics is getting a lot heavier, a new report finds.In 2014, the world collectively tossed an estimated 44.4 million metric tons of unwanted “e-waste” — battery-powered or plug-tethered devices such as laptops, smartphones and televisions. By 2030, , according to the Global E-Waste Monitor 2020. That’s roughly equivalent to eight times the weight of...

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1719 N Street
3d ago
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Here’s how flying snakes stay aloft

Here’s how flying snakes stay aloft

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueSubscribers, enter your e-mail address to access the Science News archives.Not a subscriber?.

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1719 N Street
6d ago
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To live up to the hype, quantum computers must repair their error problems

To live up to the hype, quantum computers must repair their error problems

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueAstronaut John Glenn was wary about trusting a computer.It was 1962, early in the computer age, and a room-sized machine had calculated the flight path for his upcoming orbit of Earth — the first for an American. But Glenn wasn’t willing to entrust his life to a newfangled machine that might make a mistake.The astronaut requested that mathematician Katherine Johnson double-check the...

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1719 N Street
Jun 22
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The second-worst Ebola outbreak ever is officially over

The second-worst Ebola outbreak ever is officially over

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueThe second-largest Ebola virus outbreak ever has finally come to an end. Beginning in Congo , the outbreak sickened 3,470 people (SN: 5/18/18). Nearly two-thirds of those patients, or 2,287, died.    June 25 marks 42 days after the last patient linked to the outbreak went home from the hospital on May 14. That’s two full incubation periods for the virus. With no new cases, Congo health...

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1719 N Street
Jun 26
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An asteroid’s moon got a name so NASA can bump it off its course

An asteroid’s moon got a name so NASA can bump it off its course

June 30, 2020 at 8:00 amNewly christened “Dimorphos” is a tiny space rock with a big target on its back.The International Astronomical Union on June 23 for a unique reason: It has been marked for the first-ever asteroid deflection mission. A NASA spacecraft will ram into Dimorphos — on purpose — to alter its path through space. Although Dimorphos is not at risk of striking Earth, its nearness to the planet makes it a prime testing ground for a technique to ward off in the future (SN: 5/2/17). Dimorphos is a moonlet asteroid that orbits a larger asteroid known as Didymos. Until now, the...

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1719 N Street
5d ago
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An asteroid’s moon got a name so NASA can bump it off its course

An asteroid’s moon got a name so NASA can bump it off its course

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueNewly christened “Dimorphos” is a tiny space rock with a big target on its back.The International Astronomical Union on June 23 for a unique reason: It has been marked for the first-ever asteroid deflection mission. A NASA spacecraft will ram into Dimorphos — on purpose — to alter its path through space. Although Dimorphos is not at risk of striking Earth, its nearness to the planet makes it...

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1719 N Street
5d ago
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Fish eggs can hatch after being eaten and pooped out by ducks

Fish eggs can hatch after being eaten and pooped out by ducks

For fish eggs, getting gobbled by a duck kicks off a harrowing journey that includes a pummeling in the gizzard and an attack by stomach acids. But a few eggs can exit unscathed in a duck’s excrement, possibly helping to spread those fish, including invasive species, to different places, a new study finds. It’s been an “open question for centuries how these isolated water bodies can be populated by fish,” says fish biologist Patricia Burkhardt-Holm of the University of Basel in Switzerland, who was not involved with the work. This study shows one way that water birds may disperse fish, she...

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Carolyn Wilke
6d ago
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Colliding black holes may have created a surprising flare of light

Colliding black holes may have created a surprising flare of light

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueIn spite of their dark reputations, two black holes may have set off a cosmic light show.Subtle gravitational rumbles from a collision of two black holes may have been accompanied by a flare of light about a month later, physicists report June 25 in Physical Review Letters. It’s a surprising conclusion given black holes’ propensity to swallow up light and matter. “The normal expectation has...

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Jun 25
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Strokes and mental state changes hint at how COVID-19 harms the brain

Strokes and mental state changes hint at how COVID-19 harms the brain

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueCOVID-19 cases described by U.K. doctors offer a sharper view of the illness’s possible effects on the brain. among a group of 125 people hospitalized with infections of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind the pandemic.   The results, described June 25 in Lancet Psychiatry, come from a group of severely sick people, so they can’t answer how common these types of neurological symptoms may be...

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Jun 26
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LIGO and Virgo detected a collision between a black hole and a mystery object

LIGO and Virgo detected a collision between a black hole and a mystery object

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueRipples in spacetime have revealed a distant collision between a black hole and a mystery object, which appears too massive to be a neutron star but not massive enough to be a black hole.At first glance, the event — detected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors on August 14, 2019 — looked like a collision (SN: 8/15/19). But a new analysis of the gravitational waves emanating...

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Jun 24
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Physicists spot a new class of neutrinos from the sun

Physicists spot a new class of neutrinos from the sun

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueNeutrinos spit out by the main processes that power the sun are finally accounted for, physicists report.Two sets of nuclear fusion reactions predominate in the sun’s core and both produce the lightweight subatomic particles in abundance. Scientists had previously detected neutrinos from the most prevalent process. Now, for the first time, neutrinos from the second set of reactions have been...

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Jun 24
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Smoke from Australian fires rose higher into the ozone layer than ever before

Smoke from Australian fires rose higher into the ozone layer than ever before

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueAustralia’smost recent wildfire season was so severe that smoke from the fires reached newheights in the atmosphere — and showed some very weird behavior while it was upthere.Aparticularly intense series of bushfires in southeastern Australia fromDecember 29 to January 4 spurred the formation of huge (SN: 10/22/10). Thosefire-fueled thunderstorms launched between 300,000 and 900,000 metric...

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Jun 15
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A Siberian town hit 100 degrees, setting a new record for the Arctic Circle

A Siberian town hit 100 degrees, setting a new record for the Arctic Circle

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueThe remote Siberian town of Verkhoyansk is known for its extreme cold: Winter temperatures often dip below –50° Celsius. But on June 20, temperatures in the town soared to a high of 38° C (100.4° Fahrenheit). , that marks the hottest temperature ever recorded north of the Arctic Circle.Verkhoyansk has experienced extreme heat before: On July 25, 1988, the town hit a then-record of 37.3° C...

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Jun 23
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COVID-19 lockdowns helped people get more, but not necessarily better, sleep

COVID-19 lockdowns helped people get more, but not necessarily better, sleep

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueLockdowns haven’t just — they’ve also helped people get more sleep (SN: 6/9/20).Two studies, both published June 10 in Current Biology, report that people began sleeping more and more regularly every night after countries imposed stay-at-home orders to slow the spread of the coronavirus. But that sleep may not have been of the best quality, one of those studies finds.In one study,...

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Jun 16
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Machine learning helped demystify a California earthquake swarm

Machine learning helped demystify a California earthquake swarm

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueCirculating groundwater of tiny earthquakes that rumbled beneath the Southern California town of Cahuilla, researchers report in the June 19 Science. By training computers to recognize such faint rumbles, the scientists were able not only to identify the probable culprit behind the quakes, but also to track how such mysterious swarms can spread through complex fault networks in space and...

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Jun 18
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Black hole plasma jets are shaped like bell-bottoms

Black hole plasma jets are shaped like bell-bottoms

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueJets of high-energy plasma shootingaway from supermassive black holes resemble bell-bottom pants — starting outnarrow but ending with a flare. The shape can help astrophysicists ,researchers report in the July Monthly Notices of the Royal AstronomicalSociety.“From studying this regionwhere the geometric transition happens, we can understand the black hole better,”says astrophysicist Yuri...

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Jun 18
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A dark matter experiment's unexpected result may signal new particles

A dark matter experiment's unexpected result may signal new particles

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueAn experiment searching for cosmic dark matter may have finally detected something. But it’s not dark matter.Scientists with the XENON1T experiment reported data June 17 showing an unexpectedly large number of blips within their detector. “We observe an excess … and we don’t know what it is,” said physicist Evan Shockley of the University of Chicago, who described the result .The blips could...

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Jun 17
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The steroid dexamethasone is the first drug shown to reduce COVID-19 deaths

The steroid dexamethasone is the first drug shown to reduce COVID-19 deaths

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueA low-cost steroid may save the lives of some people who are on ventilators or supplemental oxygen because of COVID-19, preliminary data from a large clinical trial suggest.Dexamethasone, a steroid in use for decades, of COVID-19 patients on ventilators by about a third compared with standard care, researchers reported in a news release June 16. Deaths of COVID-19 patients on supplemental...

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Jun 17
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A critically ill COVID-19 patient just got a double lung transplant

A critically ill COVID-19 patient just got a double lung transplant

June 11, 2020 at 6:55 pmThe successfultransplantation of a donor’s lungs to a severely ill COVID-19 patient may offerothers with irreversibly damaged lungs a means of survival.A young woman whose lungswere inflamed and scarred beyond repair because of COVID-19 has received , doctors at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicagosaid in a news briefing June 11. It’s believed to be the first time thisprocedure has been used for a coronavirus patient in the United States. Similartransplants have been reported in Austria and China.“If she didn’t get thetransplant, she would not be alive,” said...

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Jun 12
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Clues to the earliest known bow-and-arrow hunting outside Africa have been found

Clues to the earliest known bow-and-arrow hunting outside Africa have been found

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinuePeople hunted with bows and arrows in a rainforest on aSouth Asian island starting around 48,000 years ago, a new study suggests.Small bone artifacts with sharpened tips unearthed in a SriLankan cave represent , says a team led byarchaeologist Michelle Langley of Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia.Microscopic analyses of 130 of those bone points revealed surfacecracks and other...

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Jun 12
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Fossil footprints show some crocodile ancestors walked on two legs

Fossil footprints show some crocodile ancestors walked on two legs

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueFossil tracks preserved in a South Korean rock formation are the first footprint evidence that some ancient ancestors of modern crocodiles walked on two legs. The size and spacing of the 106-million-year-old tracks suggest the crocodylomorph was 2 to 3 meters long — , researchers report June 11 in Scientific Reports.The tracks were found in thefossil-rich Jinju Formation, home to the remains...

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Jun 12
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How giving cash to poor families may also save trees in Indonesia

How giving cash to poor families may also save trees in Indonesia

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueLast year marked the thirdyear in a row of when Indonesia’s bleak rate of deforestation has slowed inpace. One reason for the turnaround may be the country’s antipovertyprogram. That initiative is associated with , researchers report June 12 in Science Advances.In 2007, Indonesia started phasingin a program that gives money to its poorest residents under certain conditions,such as requiring...

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Jun 12
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A Milky Way flash implicates magnetars as a source of fast radio bursts

A Milky Way flash implicates magnetars as a source of fast radio bursts

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueAstronomersthink they’ve spotted the first example of a superbright blast of radio waves,called a fast radio burst, originating within the Milky Way.Dozensof these bursts have been sighted in other galaxies — all(SN: 2/7/20). But the outburst in ourown galaxy, detected simultaneously by two radio arrays on April 28, was closeenough to see that it was generated by a highly magnetic neutron...

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Jun 4
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Rapid sea level rise could drown protective mangrove forests by 2100

Rapid sea level rise could drown protective mangrove forests by 2100

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueMangrove forests can onlytake so much. The famously resilient, salt-tolerant and twisty trees have sofar managed to keep pace with rising sea levels, providing a valuable buffer tocoastal communities against pounding storm surges. Now, researchers have foundthe forests’ limit.  than about 7 millimeters per year, the scientistsreport in the June 5 Science. at an average rate of about 3.4...

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Jun 4
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A new device can produce electricity using shadows

A new device can produce electricity using shadows

Society for Science & the Public, which publishes Science News, uses cookies to personalize your experience and improve our services. For more information on how we use cookies on our websites, .ContinueSomeday, shadowsand light could team up to provide power.A new deviceexploits the contrast between bright spots and shade to create a current thatcan power small electronics. “We can harvest energy anywhere on Earth, not justopen spaces,” says Swee Ching Tan, a materials scientist at the NationalUniversity of Singapore.Tan and histeam created the device, called a shadow-effect energy...

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Jun 3
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