scientificamerican.com
scientificamerican.com
CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
1 reviews
PUBLIC
img-trusted
88%
8 reviews
RECENT ARTICLES
gold-cheese88%
The COVID-19 Pandemic Is Changing Our Dreams

The COVID-19 Pandemic Is Changing Our Dreams

For many of us, living in a COVID-19 world feels as if we have been thrown into an alternative reality. We live day and night inside the same walls. We fear touching groceries that arrive at our doorstep. If we venture into town we wear masks, and we get anxious if we pass someone who is not. We have trouble discerning faces. It's like living in a dream.COVID-19 has altered our dream worlds, too: how much we dream, how many of our dreams we remember and the nature of our dreams themselves. Early this year, when stay-at-home directives were put in place widely, society quite unexpectedly...

scientificamerican.com
Tore Nielsen
6h ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
The Quantum Butterfly Noneffect

The Quantum Butterfly Noneffect

Chaos theory says that a tiny, insignificant event or circumstance can have outsized influence in shaping the way a large, complex system evolves into the future. Many people are familiar with this so-called butterfly effect, an idea often traced to science fiction author Ray Bradbury’s 1952 story “A Sound of Thunder.” In that tale, a man who has time-traveled into the deep past to hunt a Tyrannosaurus rex inadvertently crushes a butterfly under his foot. When he returns to the present, he discovers that this seemingly trivial act altered the course of history—and not in a good way.In the...

scientificamerican.com
Nikolai Sinitsyn
5d ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
When Politics Distorts Science

When Politics Distorts Science

I knew things had changed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in early 2018 when my routine request to interview a CDC scientist was held up for days on end. I’d been interviewing researchers there for decades and had never before hit a delay that meant missing my deadline. When I asked what was going on, I was told, off-the-record, that media requests were now being routed from the CDC press office in Atlanta up to the bosses at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in Washington, D.C., for approval.Yikes, I thought, that’s insane. And this was well before the...

scientificamerican.com
Claudia Wallis
6d ago
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Scientists Spot Giant Planet Orbiting Dead Star’s Corpse

Scientists Spot Giant Planet Orbiting Dead Star’s Corpse

We may now have direct evidence that planets can survive unscathed the violent churn that attends their host star’s death.Astronomers have spotted signs of an intact giant planet circling a superdense stellar corpse known as a , a new study reports.The white dwarf in question, called WD 1856, is part of a three-star system that lies about 80 light-years from Earth. The newly detected, Jupiter-size  candidate, WD 1856 b, is about seven times larger than the white dwarf and zips around it once every 34 hours.“WD 1856 b somehow got very close to its white dwarf and managed to stay in one...

scientificamerican.com
Mike Wall
Sep 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
How New Mexico Controlled the Spread of COVID-19

How New Mexico Controlled the Spread of COVID-19

There is a joke in New Mexico that the rest of the country does not know the state is part of the U.S. This summer, as cases of COVID-19 surged in many parts of the nation, New Mexico really did seem to stand apart. While Arizona and Texas, its neighbors to the west and east, loosened activity and business restrictions and then experienced alarming increases in COVID-19 numbers, New Mexico kept a tighter grip on the spread of the contagion. To date, Arizona has had and nearly twice as many deaths as New Mexico has per 100,000 people. The latter state also has far fewer cases and deaths per...

scientificamerican.com
Christie Aschwanden
Sep 17
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Scientific American Endorses Joe Biden

Scientific American Endorses Joe Biden

Scientific American has never endorsed a presidential candidate in its 175-year history. This year we are compelled to do so. We do not do this lightly.The evidence and the science show that Donald Trump has badly damaged the U.S. and its people—because he rejects evidence and science. The most devastating example is his dishonest and inept response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which by the middle of September. He has also attacked environmental protections, medical care, and the researchers and public science agencies that help this country prepare for its greatest challenges. That is why we...

scientificamerican.com
The Editors
Sep 16
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Cognitive Ability and Vulnerability to Fake News

Cognitive Ability and Vulnerability to Fake News

“Fake news” is Donald Trump’s favorite catchphrase. Since the election, it has appeared in some by the President, decrying everything from accusations of sexual assault against him to the Russian collusion investigation to reports that he watches up to eight hours of television a day. Trump may just use “fake news” as a rhetorical device to discredit stories he doesn’t like, but there is evidence that real fake news is a serious problem. As one alarming example, an by the internet media company Buzzfeed revealed that during the final three months of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, the...

scientificamerican.com
David Z. Hambrick
Sep 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
COVID-19 Can Wreck Your Heart, Even if You Haven’t Had Any Symptoms

COVID-19 Can Wreck Your Heart, Even if You Haven’t Had Any Symptoms

Beyond its scientific backing, the notion that a COVID-19 patient might wind up with long-term lung scarring or breathing issues has the ring of truth. After all, we hear the stories, right? The virus can leave survivors explaining how they struggled to breathe, or how it can feel, in the of actress Alyssa Milano, “like an elephant is sitting on my chest.”We’ve also known for a while that some COVID-19 patients’ hearts are taking a beating, too—but over the past few weeks, the evidence has strengthened that cardiac damage can happen even among people who have never displayed symptoms of...

scientificamerican.com
Carolyn Barber
Sep 11
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Uber Commits to 100 Percent EVs—Will It Work?

Uber Commits to 100 Percent EVs—Will It Work?

Uber Technologies Inc. yesterday pledged to use only electric vehicles by 2030 in the United States, Canada and Europe, and by 2040 in the rest of the world.The splashy climate announcement aligned Uber with rival Lyft Inc., which vowed to reach 100% EVs by 2030 in late June (, June 22).It raised questions, however, about the feasibility of both companies’ commitments, according to experts who study clean transportation.On a Zoom call with reporters yesterday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi framed the goal as a response to the coronavirus pandemic.“During the first lockdown,” Khosrowshahi said,...

scientificamerican.com
Maxine Joselow
Sep 11
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
The Idea That a Scientific Theory Can Be ‘Falsified’ Is a Myth

The Idea That a Scientific Theory Can Be ‘Falsified’ Is a Myth

J.B.S. Haldane, one of the founders of modern evolutionary biology theory, was reportedly asked what it would take for him to lose faith in the theory of evolution and is said to have replied, “Fossil rabbits in the Precambrian.” Since the so-called “Cambrian explosion” of 500 million years ago marks the earliest appearance in the fossil record of complex animals, finding mammal fossils that predate them would falsify the theory.But would it really?The Haldane story, though apocryphal, is one of many in the scientific folklore that suggest that falsification is the defining characteristic...

scientificamerican.com
Mano Singham
Sep 10
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
First U.S. Small Nuclear Reactor Design Is Approved

First U.S. Small Nuclear Reactor Design Is Approved

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the design of a new kind of reactor, known as a small modular reactor (SMR). The design, from the Portland, Ore.–based company NuScale Power, is intended to speed construction, lower cost and improve safety over traditional nuclear reactors, which are typically many times larger. Supporters of SMRs have long touted them as a way to help revive the country’s nuclear industry and widen the spread of low-carbon electricity. But some experts have expressed concerns over the potential expense and remaining safety issues that the industry...

scientificamerican.com
Dave Levitan
Sep 10
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
This Twist on Schrödinger’s Cat Paradox Has Major Implications for Quantum Theory

This Twist on Schrödinger’s Cat Paradox Has Major Implications for Quantum Theory

What does it feel like to be both alive and dead?That question irked and inspired Hungarian-American physicist Eugene Wigner in the 1960s. He was frustrated by the paradoxes arising from the vagaries of quantum mechanics—the theory governing the microscopic realm that suggests, among many other counterintuitive things, that until a quantum system is observed, it does not necessarily have definite properties. Take his fellow physicist Erwin Schrödinger’s famous thought experiment in which a cat is trapped in a box with poison that will be released if a radioactive atom decays. Radioactivity...

scientificamerican.com
Zeeya Merali
Aug 18
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Military Metaphors Distort the Reality of COVID-19

Military Metaphors Distort the Reality of COVID-19

The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.PreviousNextDiscover world-changing science. Explore our digital archive back to 1845, including articles by more than 150 Nobel Prize winners.You have free article left.Support our award-winning coverage of advances in science & technology.Already a subscriber? Subscribers get more award-winning coverage of advances in science & technology.

scientificamerican.com
Adina Wise
Aug 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
An Immune Protein Could Prevent Severe COVID-19—if It Is Given at the Right Time

An Immune Protein Could Prevent Severe COVID-19—if It Is Given at the Right Time

When the immune system fights viruses, timing is key. And this maxim may be especially true for its defense against the deadly severe form of COVID-19.Several new studies of immune response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease, suggest timing could be critical for a class of proteins known as interferons, which are being researched as potential treatments. These immune proteins suppress viral replication early in disease. Yet if they are active later, some scientists think they can exacerbate the harmful inflammation that forces some COVID-19 patients onto life support....

scientificamerican.com
Esther Landhuis
Aug 14
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Claims of ‘Ocean’ inside Ceres May Not Hold Water

Claims of ‘Ocean’ inside Ceres May Not Hold Water

After , NASA’s Dawn spacecraft revealed a bizarre world . In the last phase of the mission, , Dawn’s orbit swept within 35 kilometers (22 miles) of Occator Crater, a 92-kilometer-wide feature dotted with and other minerals. The mission team’s analysis of the data, published on Monday in a set of seven papers in three of Nature’s journals, paints the fullest picture yet of and substantiates earlier suspicions that a reservoir of liquid water exists beneath the surface of Ceres. The extent of that supposedly watery region, however, remains unknown.“This is the last set of papers that really...

scientificamerican.com
Scott Hershberger
Aug 13
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Claims of ‘Ocean’ inside Ceres May Not Hold Water

Claims of ‘Ocean’ inside Ceres May Not Hold Water

After , NASA’s Dawn spacecraft revealed a bizarre world . In the last phase of the mission, , Dawn’s orbit swept within 35 kilometers (22 miles) of Occator Crater, a 92-kilometer-wide feature dotted with and other minerals. The mission team’s analysis of the data, published on Monday in a set of seven papers in three of Nature’s journals, paints the fullest picture yet of and substantiates earlier suspicions that a reservoir of liquid water exists beneath the surface of Ceres. The extent of that supposedly watery region, however, remains unknown.“This is the last set of papers that really...

scientificamerican.com
Scott Hershberger
Aug 12
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Russia’s Fast-Track Coronavirus Vaccine Draws Outrage over Safety

Russia’s Fast-Track Coronavirus Vaccine Draws Outrage over Safety

Russia’s president Vladimir Putin announced on August 11 that the country’s health regulator had become the world’s first to approve a coronavirus vaccine for widespread use — but scientists worldwide have condemned the decision as dangerously rushed. Russia hasn’t completed large trials to test its safety and efficacy, and rolling out an inadequately vetted vaccine could put at risk people who receive it, researchers say. It could also impede global efforts to develop quality COVID-19 immunizations, they suggest.“That the Russians may be skipping such measures and steps is what worries our...

scientificamerican.com
Ewen Callaway
Aug 12
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Could We Force the Universe to Crash?

Could We Force the Universe to Crash?

These are the days of fever dreams, whether induced by an actual virus or by the slow-motion stresses of a world dealing with a pandemic. One kind of dream in particular that I know I’ve had has to do with discovering that this was all, well, a dream. Except, when I really do wake up, I remember that there are ideas about the nature of reality that go beyond even this. The trickiest variant of these concepts is the simulation hypothesis, which is that we far more likely exist within a virtual reality than in a physical reality.The proposition that the world is a sham is not new; it’s been...

scientificamerican.com
Caleb A. Scharf
Aug 12
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Inside Joe Biden’s Network of Climate Advisers

Inside Joe Biden’s Network of Climate Advisers

Former Vice President Joe Biden had already assembled a task force of activists and liberal officials to rewrite his climate plan. But there was a problem: Organized labor hadn't been invited to the weekly Zoom calls.Biden had tailored his presidential campaign to accommodate the unions that build and maintain natural gas projects, and unions had returned the favor by boosting Biden's candidacy during his lowest points in the Democratic primary.They were unhappy about being shut out from drafting his new energy plan.So the campaign quietly added a member to its climate task force:...

scientificamerican.com
Adam Aton
Aug 8
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
Wayward Satellites Test Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity

Wayward Satellites Test Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity

In August 2014 a rocket launched the fifth and sixth satellites of the Galileo global navigation system, the European Union's $11-billion answer to the U.S.'s GPS. But celebration turned to disappointment when it became clear that the satellites had been dropped off at the wrong cosmic “bus stops.” Instead of being placed in circular orbits at stable altitudes, they were stranded in elliptical orbits useless for navigation.The mishap, however, offered a rare opportunity for a fundamental physics experiment. Two independent research teams—one led by Pacôme Delva of the Paris Observatory in...

scientificamerican.com
Megan Gannon
Aug 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
The Risks of Rushing a COVID-19 Vaccine

The Risks of Rushing a COVID-19 Vaccine

Read more about the coronavirus outbreak . And read coverage from our .Discover world-changing science. Explore our digital archive back to 1845, including articles by more than 150 Nobel Prize winners.You have free article left.Support our award-winning coverage of advances in science & technology.Already a subscriber? Subscribers get more award-winning coverage of advances in science & technology.

scientificamerican.com
William A. Haseltine
Aug 7
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
NASA’s Ingenuity—the First Ever Off-World Helicopter—Is Set for a ‘Wright Brothers Moment’ on Mars

NASA’s Ingenuity—the First Ever Off-World Helicopter—Is Set for a ‘Wright Brothers Moment’ on Mars

The SUV-sized due to launch to Mars this week has a sidekick: a svelte four-pound helicopter with four-foot-long rotor blades that weigh as light as feathers. It will attempt to make the first powered flight on another planet, a potential game-changer for deep-space exploration.If all goes as planned, dispatching the helicopter from Perseverance’s belly will be an early first step for the Mars 2020 mission after the rover’s parachute, retro-rocket and sky crane descend onto the flat floor of the planet’s in early 2021. Intended solely as a technology demonstration, the rotorcraft, named...

scientificamerican.com
Irene Klotz
Aug 4
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
With Fires, Heat and a Cyclone, Arctic Breaks Melting Record

With Fires, Heat and a Cyclone, Arctic Breaks Melting Record

Arctic sea ice hit an all-time low for July against a backdrop of record-breaking temperatures and raging wildfires at the northern reaches of Earth.Then a cyclone began swirling over the thinning ice this week.Taken together, those conditions have made scientists concerned about what the rest of the season may hold as thousands of miles of sea ice melts away every day.Ice cover in the Arctic Ocean hit an all-time low for this time of year on July 15, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Sea ice was disappearing at a rate of more than 56,400 square miles a day earlier this...

scientificamerican.com
Chelsea Harvey
Aug 1
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
The Mystery of Titan’s Expanding Orbit

The Mystery of Titan’s Expanding Orbit

Seen through the eyes of some omnipotent time traveler, our solar system—like any planetary system—is a heaving, pulsing thing. Across millions and billions of years its contents ebb and flow. Planetary orbits shift in shape and orientation, and billions of ancient asteroidal pieces shuffle through the skeletal disk that defines the major architecture of all that surrounds the sun, itself a star that sheds mass and energy as it gradually climbs an-ever brightening staircase of thermonuclear fusion.But some things are assumed to be comparatively dull and unchanging. Saturn’s largest moon,...

scientificamerican.com
Caleb A. Scharf
Jul 30
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
gold-cheese88%
GDP Is the Wrong Tool for Measuring What Matters

GDP Is the Wrong Tool for Measuring What Matters

Since World War II, most countries around the world have come to use gross domestic product, or GDP, as the core metric for prosperity. The GDP measures market output: the monetary value of all the goods and services produced in an economy during a given period, usually a year. Governments can fail if this number falls—and so, not surprisingly, governments strive to make it climb. But striving to grow GDP is not the same as ensuring the well-being of a society.In truth, “GDP measures everything,” as Senator Robert Kennedy famously said, “except that which makes life worthwhile.” The number...

scientificamerican.com
Joseph E. Stiglitz
Jul 30
Worthy
Share
Save
Give Tip
Review
AUTHORS
Lee Billings

Lee Billings

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Kat McGowan

Kat McGowan

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Dhananjay Khadilkar

Dhananjay Khadilkar

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Sophie Bushwick

Sophie Bushwick

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Andrew Rosenberg

Andrew Rosenberg

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Eben Bayer

Eben Bayer

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Thomas Frank

Thomas Frank

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Abishur Prakash

Abishur Prakash

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Geoffrey Supran

Geoffrey Supran

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Philip Goff

Philip Goff

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Jeremy Deaton

Jeremy Deaton

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Chelsea Harvey

Chelsea Harvey

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Bill Hanage

Bill Hanage

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Caroline Delbert

Caroline Delbert

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
John Horgan

John Horgan

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Jeremy Samuel Faust

Jeremy Samuel Faust

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Avi Loeb

Avi Loeb

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Riley Black

Riley Black

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Adam Popescu

Adam Popescu

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Robin George Andrews

Robin George Andrews

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Jennifer Frazer

Jennifer Frazer

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Paige Embry

Paige Embry

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Adam Becker

Adam Becker

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Joshua P. Howe

Joshua P. Howe

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A
Amy Maxmen

Amy Maxmen

CRITIC
img-contested
N/A
PUBLIC
img-contested
N/A