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The ten worst Covid data failures | The Spectator

The ten worst Covid data failures | The Spectator

Throughout the pandemic, the government and its scientific advisers have made constant predictions, projections and illustrations regarding the behaviour of Covid-19. Their figures are never revisited as the Covid narrative unfolds, which means we are not given an idea of the error margin. A look back at the figures issued shows that the track record, eventually validated against the facts, is abysmal. This is important because major decisions continue to be taken on the strength of such data. There have been several noteworthy failings so far. 1) Overstating of the number of people who are...

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Tom Jefferson & Carl Heneghan
4d ago
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Joe Biden's one job in the presidential debate | The Spectator

Joe Biden's one job in the presidential debate | The Spectator

Former Vice President Joe Biden had one job in tonight’s final presidential debate: tread water. Don't get rattled. If President Trump talks about your son, Hunter, as if he were an influence peddler or a Chinese Communist Party crony, take a breath and don’t take the bait. And definitely don’t get so angry that you provide Trump an opening to expand upon the attacks. For the most part, the long-time politician got the job done.Of course, just because Biden saved himself from getting goaded into a long discussion about his son’s alleged business dealings doesn’t mean Trump wouldn’t return...

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4d ago
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If Biden wins, who will govern? | The Spectator

If Biden wins, who will govern? | The Spectator

Joe Biden started spouting nonsense about his background again this week. Trying to sound all man of the people, he told a rally in Ohio that he would be the first president ‘in 80 or 90 years’ who did not attend one of those fancy Ivy League schools. Well no, Joe — Reagan didn’t go to an Ivy, nor did Carter, Nixon, Johnson, Eisenhower, Truman or Hoover. Joe also likes to claim that he is ‘the first in his family to go to college’. It’s a line he famously pilfered in 1987 from a Neil Kinnock speech. It also happens to be untrue.Three decades ago, people cared when Biden lied. Now nobody...

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Oct 16
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My run-in with the New York Times | The Spectator

My run-in with the New York Times | The Spectator

It’s never a good sign when you’re watching a scene of street terror in yet another gut-churning YouTube video and you find yourself thinking: ‘Hang on a minute, that’s around the corner from my apartment!’ But there’s a now infamous video from last week where a mob of enraged millennials with their fists pumped in the air surrounded a lone young woman sitting outside a Washington restaurant where I often eat. Like a scene from the Cultural Revolution, the crowd demanded she shout certain slogans and raise her clenched fist in solidarity — or be damned as a racist. Most of her fellow diners...

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Andrew Sullivan
Oct 16
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Why can’t we talk about the Great Barrington Declaration? | The Spectator

Why can’t we talk about the Great Barrington Declaration? | The Spectator

You probably haven’t heard of the Great Barrington Declaration. This is a petition started by three scientists on 4 October calling for governments to adopt a policy of ‘focused protection’ when it comes to Covid-19. They believe those most at risk should be offered protection — although it shouldn’t be mandatory — and those not at risk, which is pretty much everyone under 65 without an underlying health condition, should be encouraged to return to normal. In this way, the majority will get infected and then recover, gradually building up herd immunity, and that in turn will mean the...

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Young
Oct 16
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Did slavery really make Britain rich? | The Spectator

Did slavery really make Britain rich? | The Spectator

'It’s a sad truth that much of our wealth was derived from the slave trade', said London’s mayor Sadiq Khan. Others agree: for Al Jazeera's , ‘Britain was built on the backs, and souls, of slaves’. But there is a problem with this analysis; it’s wrong. Just like the story told of an island nation standing alone since 1066, it’s a myth that the monstrous evil of the slave trade made Britain the wealthy country it is today.Slavery and sugar did not provide the sinews of finance that drove industrialisation. Total profits from the slave trade, had they been invested entirely in Britain, would...

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Jun 20
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I thought I’d left looting mobs behind in the Middle East | The Spectator

I thought I’d left looting mobs behind in the Middle East | The Spectator

Last week shattered all my sense of stability and permanence in New York, the city I’ve called home since 2012 (though I’ve spent some of those years in London). The looting mobs that rampaged through Gotham’s streets — including my block — put me in mind of my native Middle East; it’s a phenomenon I thought I’d left behind ‘over there’, not to be encountered except on the occasional reporting trip to Iraq or Egypt. But no. An unjust police killing in Minneapolis — combined, no doubt, with the effects of a prolonged lockdown — Arab Spring’d the United States, if you will. Or rather, the...

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Sohrab Ahmari
Jun 15
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In defence of liberalism: resisting a new era of intolerance | The Spectator

In defence of liberalism: resisting a new era of intolerance | The Spectator

It has become fashionable in recent years to talk of the death of liberalism. But as crowds high on the octane of generational self-righteousness rampage through major cities, the evidence mounts. The growing intolerance of freedom of thought, the inability to talk across divides, the way that most of the British establishment, police included, feels the need to pledge fealty to the cause — as though all terrified of ending up on the wrong side — points to a crisis of more than confidence. It is evidence of an underlying morbidity.Each day the cultural revolution is picking up a pace, with...

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Douglas Murray
Jun 12
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The NHS has quietly changed its trans guidance to reflect reality | The Spectator

The NHS has quietly changed its trans guidance to reflect reality | The Spectator

Imagine you have a child who says they believe they were born in the wrong body, describing what amounts to a fundamental and painful mismatch between their biological sex and their gender identity. Imagine the child you see as your daughter declaring that they are in fact a boy. Where would you turn for information? No doubt a lot of people in such a position would consult the NHS. That ‘mismatch’, after all, could be a sign of gender dysphoria, a condition recognised – and treated – by the health service. What would you find if you looked up this issue on the excellent and comprehensive...

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James Kirkup
Jun 12
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