theatlantic.com
theatlantic.com
The Atlantic is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher. It was founded in 1857 in Boston, Massachusetts, as The Atlantic Monthly, a literary and cultural commentary magazine that published leading writers' commentary on the abolition of slavery, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. Its founders included Francis H. Underwood and prominent writers Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Greenleaf Whittier. James Russell Lowell was its first editor. It is known for publishing literary pieces by leading writers.Source
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Candy Land Was Invented for Polio Wards

Candy Land Was Invented for Polio Wards

If you were a child at some point in the past 70 years, odds are you played the board game Candy Land. the toy historian Tim Walsh, a staggering 94 percent of mothers are aware of Candy Land, and more than 60 percent of households with a 5-year-old child own a set. The game continues to sell about 1 million copies every year.You know how it goes: Players race down a sinuous but linear track, its spaces tinted one of six colors or marked by a special candy symbol. They draw from a deck of cards corresponding to the board’s colors and symbols. They move their token to the next space that...

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Alexander B. Joy
Jul 28
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What Makes Us Happy?

What Makes Us Happy?

Is there a formula—some mix of love, work, and psychological adaptation—for a good life?For 72 years, researchers at Harvard have been examining this question, following 268 men who entered college in the late 1930s through war, career, marriage and divorce, parenthood and grandparenthood, and old age. Here, for the first time, a journalist gains access to the archive of one of the most comprehensive longitudinal studies in history. Its contents, as much literature as science, offer profound insight into the human condition—and into the brilliant, complex mind of the study’s longtime...

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Joshua Wolf Shenk
Jun 1
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Why I Put My Wife’s Career First

Why I Put My Wife’s Career First

Tmy wife, Anne-Marie Slaughter, wrote in these pages about how difficult it remains for women to “—a family and a career. She’d recently left a high-powered job in Washington, D.C., to return to our home in Princeton, New Jersey, where I had been acting as lead parent to our children. Somewhat ironically, her article on work-life balance led her to increased prominence on the national stage, which reinforced my role as the lead parent of our two sons—a role I continue to fill today.Here is the other half of our family’s story.Anne-Marie and I went to college just as female graduates were...

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Andrew Moravcsik
Sep 10
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Trump Is Turning America Into the ‘Shithole Country’ He Fears

Trump Is Turning America Into the ‘Shithole Country’ He Fears

There is a lot of learned material written about nationalism—scholarly books and papers, histories of it, theories of it—but most of us understand that nationalism, at its heart, at its very deepest roots, is about a feeling of superiority: We are better than you. Our country is better than your country. Or even—and apologies, but this is the precise language deployed by the president of the United States: Your country is a shithole country. Ours isn’t.In this sense, nationalism is not patriotism, which is the desire to work on behalf of your fellow citizens, to defend common values, to...

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Anne Applebaum
Jul 3
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Australia Has a Flesh-Eating-Bacteria Problem

Australia Has a Flesh-Eating-Bacteria Problem

In the beach towns south of Melbourne, everyone, it seems, knows someone who’s been attacked.A after Steven Mikac began taking antibiotics for the strange spot on his leg, the flesh around his ankle started to tighten and swell. The moist orifice of a wound opened up and took the form of a small bullet hole. A plug of tissue had gone missing—dissolved into pus and slime. Walking was excruciating. Working, unbearable. In early October of last year, Mikac showed his ankle to a colleague at the hospital where he works in Melbourne, in the Australian state of Victoria. She suggested that it...

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Brendan Borrell
Jul 3
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The Boogaloo Tipping Point

The Boogaloo Tipping Point

On May 29, two federal security officers guarding a courthouse in Oakland, California, were ambushed by machine-gun fire as elsewhere in the city demonstrators marched peacefully to protest the killing of George Floyd. One of the guards, David Patrick Underwood, died as a result of the attack, and the other was wounded. For days, conservative news broadcasters pinned the blame on “antifa,” the loosely affiliated group of anti-fascist anarchists known to attack property and far-right demonstrators at protests. But the alleged culprit, apprehended a week later, turned out to be a 32-year-old...

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Dale Beran
Jul 4
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A College Degree Is No Guarantee of a Good Life

A College Degree Is No Guarantee of a Good Life

“” is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness.I young man, a senior in high school. His academic performance has never been over the top, but he’s done well enough. Among his classmates, the assumption is that all of them will go to college. However, just as his parents are about to send the deposit check to a college where he has been accepted, the young man admits to himself and his parents that he doesn’t want to go—not now, maybe never. To him, college sounds like drudgery. He wants to work, to earn a living, to be out on his own.What should he...

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Arthur C. Brooks
Jul 2
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Oklahomans Just Embarrassed Trump a Second Time

Oklahomans Just Embarrassed Trump a Second Time

For the second time in two weeks, Oklahomans have made President Donald Trump look bad. First there was the . Now Sooner State voters have under the Affordable Care Act.There’s an immediate, narrow problem for the White House, and a broader, more strategic one. In the short term, the very tight “yes” vote to turn Medicaid funding into a block grant from the federal government to states, using Oklahoma as a pilot.In a deeper sense, though, the vote is a warning sign for Trump, because it shows how he’s at odds with even many conservative voters on health care. Last week, the Trump...

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David A. Graham
Jul 2
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Fear of Public Transit Got Ahead of the Evidence

Fear of Public Transit Got Ahead of the Evidence

The headline of the report read like the title of a 1950s horror film: “.” As America’s densest city became the epicenter of a national pandemic in March, New York’s subway system, which carried 5.5 million people on an average workday in 2019, emerged as the villain from central casting. Landing in mid-April, the report, written by an MIT economics professor, concluded that New York’s subway system was “a major disseminator—if not the principal transmission vehicle” in the city’s COVID-19 outbreak.Ominous articles citing the report created an uproar during the opening weeks of the...

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Janette Sadik
Jun 14
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To Avoid Integration, Americans Built Barricades in Urban Space

To Avoid Integration, Americans Built Barricades in Urban Space

George Floyd was killed by a Minneapolis police officer at the corner of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue. The location is significant. It lies in a part of the city wedged between two freeways and not far from an unofficial boundary separating neighborhoods with large populations of black and Latino residents from the mostly white neighborhoods to the south. For decades, this boundary was legally enforced through covenants limiting who could live where.America’s brand of urban inequality relies on such barricades to ensure that all kinds of problems—of which aggressive policing is just...

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Patrick Sharkey
Jun 20
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White Voters Are Abandoning Trump

White Voters Are Abandoning Trump

For most of the past three years, the only thing more futile than was expecting the American people to do so. No matter how successful the president was, or, more often, how chaotic and disorderly his administration was, nothing seemed to be able to shake up people’s views of Trump.Popular approval of Trump hovered in the same narrow range, roughly from 39 to 45 percent, through Charlottesville and tax reform, supposed border caravans and mass shootings, Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report and impeachment.As the election approaches, the president’s approval rating becomes less important...

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David A. Graham
Jun 30
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The 3 Weeks That Changed Everything

The 3 Weeks That Changed Everything

Imagine if the National Transportation Safety Board investigated America’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.C a pandemic is one of the most complex challenges a society can face. To minimize death and damage, leaders and citizens must orchestrate a huge array of different resources and tools. Scientists must explore the most advanced frontiers of research while citizens attend to the least glamorous tasks of personal hygiene. Physical supplies matter—test kits, protective gear—but so do intangibles, such as “flattening the curve” and public trust in official statements. The response...

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James Fallows
Jun 29
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Stop Firing the Innocent

Stop Firing the Innocent

A organizations of all sorts have scrambled to institute a zero-tolerance policy on racism over the past few weeks, some of them have turned out to be more interested in signaling their good intentions than punishing actual culprits. This emphasis on appearing rather than being virtuous has already resulted in the mistreatment of innocent people—not all of them public figures or well-connected individuals with wealth to cushion their fall.What happened to Emmanuel Cafferty is an especially egregious example. At the end of a long shift mapping underground utility lines, he was on his way...

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Yascha Mounk
Jun 27
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A Mysterious Rhythm Is Coming From Another Galaxy

A Mysterious Rhythm Is Coming From Another Galaxy

For about four days, the radio waves would arrive at random. Then, for the next 12, nothing.Then, another four days of haphazard pulses. Followed by another 12 days of silence.The pattern—the well-defined swings from frenzy to stillness and back again—persisted like clockwork for more than a year.Dongzi Li, a doctoral student at the University of Toronto, started tracking these signals in 2019. She works on a Canadian-led project, CHIME, that studies astrophysical phenomena called “fast radio bursts.” These invisible flashes, known as FRBs for short, reach Earth from all directions in...

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Marina Koren
Jun 26
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Julián Castro: ‘This Is the Time to Make Change’

Julián Castro: ‘This Is the Time to Make Change’

Julián Castro was ahead of the curve. The former San Antonio mayor and secretary of housing and urban development failed to get traction in the 2020 Democratic primary, but his campaign was focused on the issues of racial and economic justice that are now at the center of the national debate over discrimination in America, .When I , he was already proposing the creation of a federal database for police misconduct, the imposition of rules compelling cops to report impropriety by fellow officers, and the curtailment of qualified immunity, the legal doctrine that makes it nearly impossible for...

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Adam Serwer
Jun 26
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The Temptation of Kayleigh McEnany

The Temptation of Kayleigh McEnany

past a graffiti-covered wall and black metal security barriers, her signature cross necklace dangling above her double-breasted navy blazer. She watched as President Donald Trump held a Bible aloft in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church. When he turned to her and pointed, she scooted into the frame, taking her place by his side with her phone clutched behind her back. Stately white corbels framed the plywood-covered windows and door of the building, where a fire had been set in the nursery the night before. McEnany, Trump, and a handful of other administration officials stood silently,...

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Emma Green
Jun 25
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The Decline of the American World

The Decline of the American World

Other countries are used to loathing America, admiring America, and fearing America (sometimes all at once). But pitying America? That one is new.“He hated America very deeply,” John le Carré wrote of his fictional Soviet mole, Bill Haydon, in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. Haydon had just been unmasked as a double agent at the heart of Britain’s secret service, one whose treachery was motivated by animus, not so much to England but to America. “It’s an aesthetic judgment as much as anything,” Haydon explained, before hastily adding: “Partly a moral one, of course.”I thought of this as I...

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Tom McTague
Jun 24
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It All Happened In Full View

It All Happened In Full View

F Watergate scandal offered the country a mystery that followed the pattern of a traditional detective story. A crime had been committed. Who did it, and why? First the media, and then Congress and prosecutors, followed the clues for two years—until, at last, evidence was discovered proving that the culprit was indeed President Richard Nixon.The Trump-Russia scandal, by contrast, offers an update on the old formula, much as the innovative Columbo series did in the 1970s. The offense and the perpetrator were revealed to the audience in full at the very beginning of the story. The question is...

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David Frum
Jun 24
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DACA Isn’t What Made Me an American

DACA Isn’t What Made Me an American

When the Supreme Court announced its ruling in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals case on Thursday, I—like many other DACA recipients in America—felt an incredulous relief. For months, the possibility that our lives in America would be upended by just five people’s votes hung over us. Indeed, a central part of the undocumented experience for the past eight years has been to weather constant whiplash from a never-ending cycle of highs and lows across all three branches of government. But now, it seemed, the law would make room for what had always been true for us: Home is here.These...

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Jin K. Park
Jun 23
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It Didn’t Have to Be Like This

It Didn’t Have to Be Like This

W took office in 2017, he pointed to “mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation,” and vowed to end this “American carnage.” From now on, he said, “every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and American families.” And he made a promise: “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”More than three years later, tens of millions of the Americans Trump promised not to forget are out of work, many of...

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Adam Serwer
Jun 16
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The Second Great Depression

The Second Great Depression

The American economy is reopening. In Alabama, gyms are back in business. In Georgia, restaurants are seating customers again. In Texas, the bars are packed. And in Vermont, the stay-at-home order has been lifted. People are still frightened. Americans are still dying. But the next, queasy phase of the coronavirus pandemic is upon us. And it seems likely that the financial nadir, the point at which the economy stops collapsing and begins growing again, has passed.What will the recovery look like? At this fraught moment, no one knows enough about consumer sentiment and government ordinances...

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Annie Lowrey
Jun 23
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You’re Showering Too Much

You’re Showering Too Much

Iwhen the Canadian air starts drying out, the men flock to Sandy Skotnicki’s office. The men are itchy. Skotnicki studied microbiology before becoming an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Toronto. She has been practicing for 23 years, always with an eye to how the environment—including the microbial one on our skin—affects health. “I say to them, ‘How do you shower?’ ” she told me. “They take the squeegee thing and wash their whole body with some sort of men’s body wash. They’re showering twice a day because they’re working out. As soon as I get them to stop doing that...

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James Hamblin
Jun 22
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The Dark Soul of the Sunshine State

The Dark Soul of the Sunshine State

F , plastic state, state of swamp and glitz, state as object of the lust and ridicule of the other 49, state dangling off the body of the continent like—well!—a hanging chad. Seek to encapsulate Florida in a single narrative, and you’ll find yourself thwarted. What is normal in the backwoods of the panhandle or on the of north-central Florida is ludicrously alien in Miami Beach. Even the stories that have lured the majority of Floridians to this place are largely empty promises, gusts of devilishly hot and humid air. Because most of us have come from elsewhere, including me, and because the...

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Lauren Groff
Jun 21
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Since I Met Edward Snowden, I’ve Never Stopped Watching My Back

Since I Met Edward Snowden, I’ve Never Stopped Watching My Back

After receiving a trove of documents from the whistleblower, I found myself under surveillance and investigation by the U.S. government.“W does your clock say?” asked the voice on the telephone, the first words Edward Snowden ever spoke to me aloud. (Our previous communications had all been via secure text chats over encrypted anonymous links on secret servers.) I glanced at my wrist—3:22 p.m. “Good. Meet me exactly at four. I’ll be wearing a backpack.” Of course he would; Snowden would never leave his laptop unattended.The rendezvous point Snowden selected that day, December 5, 2013, was a...

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Barton Gellman
May 18
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The 'Silent Majority' Didn't Show Up For Trump

The 'Silent Majority' Didn't Show Up For Trump

Rarely has a single campaign rally drawn as much hype as the one President Donald Trump held Saturday night at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma—a relaunch of his reelection bid that, , more than 1 million people had requested tickets to attend. Rarely has a presidential event of the community it was held in. And rarely has a spotty crowd made such a statement.It turns out Oklahomans might care more about their own health than the president does.Trump had hailed this rally as something more than a return to the campaign trail. His insistence on speaking to a packed, indoor arena full of...

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Russell Berman
Jun 21
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