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Study: E-Cigarettes Trigger Inflammation in the Gut

Study: E-Cigarettes Trigger Inflammation in the Gut

Touted by makers as a “healthy” alternative to traditional nicotine cigarettes, new research indicates the chemicals found in e-cigarettes disrupt the gut barrier and trigger inflammation in the body, potentially leading to a variety of health concerns. In the study, published Jan. 5, 2021 in the journal , Soumita Das, PhD, associate professor of pathology, and Pradipta Ghosh, MD, professor of cellular and molecular medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues, found that chronic use of nicotine-free e-cigarettes...

ucsd.edu
Jan 14
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Youth Using E-cigarettes Three Times as Likely to Become Daily Cigarette Smokers

Youth Using E-cigarettes Three Times as Likely to Become Daily Cigarette Smokers

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ucsd.edu
Jan 10
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Researchers discover a new superhighway system in the Solar System

Researchers discover a new superhighway system in the Solar System

Researchers have discovered a new superhighway network to travel through the Solar System much faster than was previously possible. Such routes can drive comets and asteroids near Jupiter to Neptune’s distance  in under a decade and to 100 astronomical units in less than a century. They could be used to send spacecraft to the far reaches of our planetary system relatively fast, and to monitor and understand near-Earth objects that might collide with our planet.In their paper, published in the Nov. 25 issue of Science Advances, the researchers observed the dynamical structure of these...

ucsd.edu
Dec 11
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I See You: Honey Bees Use Contagious and Honest Visual Signal to Deter Attacking Hornets

I See You: Honey Bees Use Contagious and Honest Visual Signal to Deter Attacking Hornets

Nieh believes that the findings provide a cautionary tale about fake news for all of us.“Individuals in a honey bee colony are completely interdependent. They can’t go out and make it on their own. Cooperation is paramount, especially when faced with a large, heavily armored predator like hornets,” said Nieh. “A couple of hornets can kill thousands of bees in a single day. Yet through teamwork that correctly produces synchronized, massed ISY signals, they can get the hornet to back off without harming a single bee. Maybe that’s a lesson for us all.”Mario Aguilera,858-822-5148,UC San Diego’s...

ucsd.edu
Dec 11
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Virus-Like Probes Could Help Make Rapid COVID-19 Testing More Accurate, Reliable

Virus-Like Probes Could Help Make Rapid COVID-19 Testing More Accurate, Reliable

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe.The positive controls, made from virus-like particles, are stable and easy to manufacture. Researchers say the controls have the potential to improve the accuracy of new COVID-19 tests that are simpler, faster and cheaper, making it possible to expand testing outside the lab.“Our goal is to make an impact not necessarily in the hospital, where you have...

ucsd.edu
Dec 11
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Excessive Fructose Consumption May Cause a Leaky Gut, Leading to Fatty Liver Disease

Excessive Fructose Consumption May Cause a Leaky Gut, Leading to Fatty Liver Disease

Excessive consumption of fructose — a sweetener ubiquitous in the American diet — can result in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is comparably abundant in the United States. But contrary to previous understanding, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that fructose only adversely affects the liver after it reaches the intestines, where the sugar disrupts the epithelial barrier protecting internal organs from bacterial toxins in the gut.Developing treatments that prevent intestinal barrier disruption, the authors conclude in a study...

ucsd.edu
Aug 26
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UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering

UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering

Our leaders are working closely with federal and state officials to ensure your ongoing safety at the university. Stay up to date with the latest developments.

ucsd.edu
May 3
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Call for Citizen Scientists to Contribute to COVID-19 Studies

Call for Citizen Scientists to Contribute to COVID-19 Studies

, a crowdsourced research effort based at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, has expanded its capabilities to now allow citizen-scientists around the world to help collect crucial information about SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus causing a COVID-19 pandemic.“We are now positioned to collect data that will help drive epidemiological studies of where the virus is and isn’t, and help researchers determine who is at greatest risk, who is already immune, how the virus is transmitted and how it spreads through a population,” said Rob Knight, professor and director of the...

ucsd.edu
Apr 17
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A Deep Look into the Biology and Evolution of COVID-19

A Deep Look into the Biology and Evolution of COVID-19

Of the hundreds of coronaviruses known to exist, many are relatively harmless. Coronaviruses infect your nose, sinuses and upper throat but often result in nothing more than a common cold (see ).So what makes the new SARS-CoV-2, the virus that has caused a global pandemic, such a society-altering threat?Probing the biological basis of the novel virus and evolutionary spread of the COVID-19 disease it causes, a panel of UC San Diego biologists gathered for a special roundtable analysis hosted by UCTV. The program is available here:Roundtable moderator Suresh Subramani, distinguished...

ucsd.edu
Apr 17
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Loss of Smell and Taste Validated as COVID-19 Symptoms

Loss of Smell and Taste Validated as COVID-19 Symptoms

Loss of smell and taste has been anecdotally linked to COVID-19 infections. In a study published April 12, 2020 in the journal , researchers at UC San Diego Health report the first empirical findings that strongly associate sensory loss with COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus.  “Based on our study, if you have smell and taste loss, you are more than 10 times more likely to have COVID-19 infection than other causes of infection. The most common first sign of a COVID-19 infection remains fever, but fatigue and loss of smell and taste follow as other very common...

ucsd.edu
Apr 17
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Loss of Smell and Taste Validated as COVID-19 Symptoms

Loss of Smell and Taste Validated as COVID-19 Symptoms

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UCSDHealth
Apr 13
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