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Leukemia drug nilotinib safe, shows promise against Alzheimer's disease in trial

Leukemia drug nilotinib safe, shows promise against Alzheimer's disease in trial

The leukemia drug nilotinib is safe for use in Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found. File Photo by BillionPhotos.com/ShutterstockThe leukemia drug nilotinib, which shows promise in reducing the effects of Alzheimer's disease, is safe and has minimal side effects when used at low doses, according to a small clinical trial published Friday in the journal .The drug, known commercially as Tasigna, appears to reverse some of the effects of Alzheimer's disease brain based on , the authors said."The results of this exploratory study repurposing nilotinib are encouraging," Howard Fillit,...

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1d ago
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Ring might help detect COVID-19 outbreaks in healthcare workers, public

Ring might help detect COVID-19 outbreaks in healthcare workers, public

A new study will evaluate Oura ring's ability to help predict COVID-19 outbreaks among health workers. Photo courtesy of Oura RingResearchers at Florida Atlantic University this week announced plans to begin studying a new device that might help spot future outbreaks of and other infections among healthcare workers and, eventually, the public.The wearable technology, called the Oura ring, is intended to track the body's heart rate, temperature, movement and sleep patterns. The measurements, when combined with responses to daily symptom surveys, can assist clinicians to predict the onset of...

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2d ago
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FEMA says it's ready for hurricane season with budget boosted by COVID-19 stimulus

FEMA says it's ready for hurricane season with budget boosted by COVID-19 stimulus

President Donald Trump listens as he receives a briefing on the 2020 hurricane season Thursday in the Oval Office. Pool Photo by Doug Mills/UPI |The Federal Emergency Management Agency is "in a really great place" in terms of funding as hurricane season gets underway, the agency's chief said Thursday.FEMA Administrator Pete Gaynor said the agency typically starts hurricane season with $40 billion in disaster-relief funding. This year, though, the federal government has nearly double that."That's the result of Congress appropriating nearly $40 billion for , so we're in a really great place...

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DanielleHaynes1
1d ago
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Few in U.S. with private insurance receive opioid overdose follow-up treatment

Few in U.S. with private insurance receive opioid overdose follow-up treatment

Having health insurance is no guarantee of receiving treatment following an opioid overdose, according to a new study. Photo by /PixabayFewer than 20 percent of people with private healthcare insurance who suffered a non-fatal opioid overdose ultimately receive abuse or addiction treatment, according to a study published Wednesday by .Moreover, black and Hispanic opioid users were less likely than their white counterparts to get treatment within 90 days of experiencing an overdose, the authors found."An opioid overdose is more than an isolated event -- for people that survive, it is an...

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3d ago
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Physicists observe quantum entanglement of 15 trillion atoms

Physicists observe quantum entanglement of 15 trillion atoms

New research suggests heated, high-density atomic gas clouds can feature upwards of 15 trillion entangled atoms. Photo by IFCOScientists have observed an unexpectedly large quantum system featuring 15 trillion entangled atoms, according to a new study.Quantum entanglement describes the connection between separate particles. The phenomenon is key to the promise of quantum computing, quantum encryption and other quantum technologies.Usually, quantum entanglement features a pair of coupled atoms or electrons. Entangled states are quite delicate. To ensure entangled particles remain...

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May 15
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40% of COVID-19 patients may be asymptomatic as disease progresses

40% of COVID-19 patients may be asymptomatic as disease progresses

An employee wearing a face shield and face masks uses an infrared thermometer to check the temperature of customers at the entrance of the Matsuya Ginza department store, which partially reopened in Tokyo on Monday. Photo by Keizo Mori/UPI |As many as 40 percent of patients with may be asymptomatic, according to a small analysis of cases in China published Wednesday by .Although patients with milder, asymptomatic COVID-19 -- the disease caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 -- may suffer less damage to their immune systems, they may still be contagious, but for less time than those with...

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2d ago
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LGBTQ teens 5 times more likely to be bullied before suicide, study finds

LGBTQ teens 5 times more likely to be bullied before suicide, study finds

Among teens who die by suicide, LGBTQ teens are up to five times more likely to have been bullied before their deaths. Photo by StockSnap/PixabayMore than one in five LGBTQ teens who died by suicide suffered bullying because of their sexual orientation or gender identity, according to a study published Tuesday by .Overall, among teens who died by suicide, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender young people were nearly five times as likely to have experienced bullying than their non-LGBTQ peers, the authors found."Bullying is one factor that can contribute to suicide for all youth, but our...

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4d ago
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Workplace wellness programs don't improve overall staff health, study finds

Workplace wellness programs don't improve overall staff health, study finds

Workplace wellness programs might boost employee engagement in medical care, but won't necessarily improve overall health, a new study indicates. File photo by Susan Knowles/UPI |Workplace wellness programs designed to encourage employees to engage in activities and monitor their health might have negligible benefits, according to a study published Tuesday by .Researchers said business owners and managers should "temper their expectations" regarding the effects of these initiatives on overall health, and consider whether they are worth the effort.With employers more concerned about the...

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3d ago
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Dementia gene might increase risk for serious COVID-19, study says

Dementia gene might increase risk for serious COVID-19, study says

A gene linked to dementia risk raises the likelihood of serious illness from COVID-19, a new study has found. File photo by Peter DaSilva/UPI |A genetic mutation linked to dementia might increase a person's risk for serious illness from , a study published Tuesday in the said.The findings are the latest to report a possible association between genetics prognosis with the disease caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.The elderly and those with underlying health conditions, including dementia, already are at greater risk for severe disease and death from the virus, experts have...

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4d ago
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Ex-comfort woman decries 'betrayal' in South Korea activist scandal

Ex-comfort woman decries 'betrayal' in South Korea activist scandal

Former South Korean comfort woman Lee Yong-soo has spoken out against Yoon Mi-hyang, head of the Korean Council for Justice and Remembrance. File Photo by Keizo Mori/UPI |The former South Korean comfort woman who accused an activist of misappropriating funds said Monday she had been "betrayed overnight" after being "used" by lawmaker-elect Yoon Mi-hyang for three decades.-soo, 91, said Monday at a press conference in the South Korean city of Daegu her relationship with Yoon began in June 1992, Yonhap reported.Yoon had requested former comfort women who had come forward at the time to gather...

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5d ago
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Social isolation increases risk for COVID-19, other health problems, studies say

Social isolation increases risk for COVID-19, other health problems, studies say

Closed businesses on the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles. Social isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic can lead to other health problems, research says. Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI |Social distancing can help stop the spread of COVID-19, but social isolation may have the opposite effect and also lead to other health problems, two new studies concluded.The studies show that socially isolated people are nearly 50 percent more likely to die from any cause, and that older isolated people, especially those in residential nursing homes, are at much higher risk for the new...

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May 21
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Studies show significant risks to health workers during pandemic

Studies show significant risks to health workers during pandemic

Healthcare workers wearing protective face masks and medical clothing stand outside an entrance to Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in New York City in April. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI |Front-line healthcare workers are at significant risk for and can contribute to community spread, according to several new studies, including two published Thursday in JAMA Network Open.The findings -- nearly 47 percent of cases analyzed in six countries were linked to work places, most in healthcare -- suggest front-line workers need better protection, experts say."Protecting the high-risk workers ... not...

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May 21
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16% of recovered patients test positive for COVID-19 weeks after discharge: study

16% of recovered patients test positive for COVID-19 weeks after discharge: study

Pedestrians no longer practice social distancing but continue to wear protective face masks while visiting a popular entertainment area in Beijing on April 26, 2020. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI |Up to one in six people declared recovered from and discharged from the hospital still test positive for the virus up to three weeks later, meaning they still could be contagious, according to a study published Friday by .The findings reinforce that researchers still are learning about the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, including how it affects those infected and how it's spread, said Dr. M. Anthony...

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May 22
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New urine-based kidney stone test delivers results in 30 minutes

New urine-based kidney stone test delivers results in 30 minutes

A newly developed urine test might speed the diagnosis -- and treatment -- of kidney stones, a new study has found. File photo by Shutterstock/ImgingA new urine-based testing system can diagnose people with kidney stones in 30 minutes or less, a study published Friday in the journal has found.Faster test results mean those with the painful condition can start treatment -- and hopefully recover -- sooner. Current testing approaches take up to 10 days to produce results."Since the result will be available immediately, such as during an office visit, it will tell the doctor the cause of the...

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May 22
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Vaccine for COVID-19 safe, effective in first human clinical trial, study says

Vaccine for COVID-19 safe, effective in first human clinical trial, study says

A new vaccine for COVID-19 has shown promise in the first human trials. Photo by Airman 1st Class Matthew Lotz/U.S. Air ForceA potential vaccine for appears to be safe and able to generate an immune response against the virus, according to a study published Friday by .The new study marks the first time the vaccine was tested in humans.The findings are preliminary, and based on observations made over the first 28 days after the vaccine was administered. The final results are to be evaluated in six months."These results represent an important milestone," co-author Wei Chen, of the Beijing...

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May 22
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16% of recovered patients test positive for COVID-19 weeks after discharge, study finds

16% of recovered patients test positive for COVID-19 weeks after discharge, study finds

Pedestrians no longer practice social distancing but continue to wear protective face masks while visiting a popular entertainment area in Beijing on April 26, 2020. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI |Up to one in six people declared recovered from and discharged from the hospital still test positive for the virus up to three weeks later, meaning they still could be contagious, according to a study published Friday by .The findings reinforce that researchers still are learning about the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, including how it affects those infected and how it's spread, said Dr. M. Anthony...

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May 22
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Risk for MS 30% higher for those living in cities, study finds

Risk for MS 30% higher for those living in cities, study finds

Those living in cities are at higher risk for multiple sclerosis, according to a new study. Photo by Pech Frantisek/PixabayCity-dwellers are nearly 30 percent more likely to be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis than those living in more rural areas, a study presented Friday at the European Academy of Neurology Virtual Congress has found.Based on the results, which will also be published in , air pollution could be a risk factor for the development of the disease, according to the authors, who conducted their research in Italy."It is well recognized that immune diseases such as MS are...

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May 22
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Chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine linked to higher death risk in COVID-19

Chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine linked to higher death risk in COVID-19

A new study with data from 15,000 patients found limited benefit and increased risks for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in patients with COVID-19. UPI File Photo  |Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine offer no clinical benefit for people with and might cause serious heart-related side effects, according to a study published Friday in .People with severe illness caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, treated with either drug -- either alone or with an antiviral medication -- were up to twice as likely to die than those in the control group, which received standard, supportive care, the...

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May 22
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Testing, quarantining can prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in senior facilities, study finds

Testing, quarantining can prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in senior facilities, study finds

Wilma Grove uses a cell phone to talk to her children, Judy Kekich and Ed Grove, during their visit to Delmar Gardens on the Green in Ballwin, Mo., in March. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI |Proactive testing and strict quarantining procedures at assisted-living facilities can help prevent outbreaks of among residents and the staff, a study published Thursday by found.Taking this approach at an unnamed facility in Seattle effectively limited cases of the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, to six -- four among 80 residents and two among 62 staff members -- researchers said."Assisted-living facilities...

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May 21
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Appeals court blocks execution of Ohio man convicted in 1986 murder

Appeals court blocks execution of Ohio man convicted in 1986 murder

A federal appeals court on Wednesday ruled that Ohio cannot execute a man sentenced to death in the rape and murder of a 12-year-old boy as he is intellectually disabled.The three-judge panel for the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reversing and remanding Danny Hill's death sentence in the 1986 murder of 12-year-old Raymond Fife.The court ruled that executing Danny Hill would be unconstitutional under the 2002 decision in Atkins vs. Virginia, which bars the execution of the intellectually disabled."No person looking at this record could reasonably deny that Hill is intellectually disabled...

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May 21
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Primary care doctor visits down 60% since start of COVID-19 pandemic

Primary care doctor visits down 60% since start of COVID-19 pandemic

Eight year-old Kayden Tree grimaces as a swab is inserted into his nose by nurse Nellie Smith (L) and Ebonie Hearn during a COVID-19 test at a CareSTL Health testing Site in St. Louis on May 11. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI |Visits to primary care doctors declined by as much as 60 percent as the outbreak took hold in the United States in early April, an analysis has found.The impact on health, even as practices begin to reopen for non-coronavirus patients, has been significant, experts say.In research conducted by The Commonwealth Fund, a non-profit focused on healthcare access and...

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May 20
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Controlling blood pressure may reduce dementia risk by 7%

Controlling blood pressure may reduce dementia risk by 7%

Effectively controlling blood pressure may also reduce risk for dementia, a new analysis has found. Photo by agilemktg1/FlickrTreating high blood pressure may also reduce risk for dementia or cognitive impairment later in life, an analysis published Tuesday by has found.Researchers report that treating high blood pressure, or hypertension, with medications such as beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and ARB blockers lowers a person's likelihood of developing dementia by more than 7 percent, and some forms of cognitive decline by more than 20 percent.Scientists in Ireland, Scotland and Canada...

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May 19
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Mobile app effective for 60% of people with depression, anxiety

Mobile app effective for 60% of people with depression, anxiety

A suite of mobile apps shows promise for helping people with depression and anxiety manage their symptoms. Photo by sasint/PixabayAn app designed to help primary care physicians manage patients with mental health conditions is easy to use and successfully assisted in the delivery of treatment, according to a study published Wednesday by .The study assessed a mobile app called Intellicare, finding that more than half the patients using it to manage symptoms and engage in self-care reported "recovery" from depression and anxiety.Researchers said study participants found their symptoms...

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May 20
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States start to expand COVID-19 testing as country reopens

States start to expand COVID-19 testing as country reopens

States have begun to expand testing, but more is needed to safely reopen, experts say. File Photo by Sarah Silbiger/UPI |The United States might be getting up to speed with testing, experts say, as several states announced plans Wednesday to expand access to diagnostic evaluations.Hawaii, Maryland and Missouri, among others, have indicated that they will make testing available to more people in the weeks ahead as the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, continues to spread in parts of the country.Testing large segments of the population is seen as key to containing the outbreak, as well as allowing...

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May 20
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U.S. birth rate declines to 35-year low

U.S. birth rate declines to 35-year low

The latest CDC figures show the U.S. birth rate fell 1 percent in 2019. Photo by /PixabayThe birth rate dropped for the fifth year in a row in the United States, bringing the number of babies born across the country to a 35-year low, according to figures by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The report reveals that the number of births in 2019 was 3.745 million, down 1 percent from 2018. The general fertility rate in 2019 was 58.2 births per 1,000 among women between 15 and 44 years of age, down 2 percent from 2018.Apart from a slight rise in the birth rate in 2014, U.S. births...

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May 20
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