wired.com
wired.com
Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993. Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany.Source
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Clubhouse's Security and Privacy Lag Behind Its Explosive Growth

Clubhouse's Security and Privacy Lag Behind Its Explosive Growth

the audio-based social media app . The format feels familiar: part Twitter, part Facebook Live, part talking on the phone. But as Clubhouse continues to expand, its security and privacy failings have come under increased scrutiny—and left the company scrambling to correct problems and manage expectations.Clubhouse, still in beta and available only on iOS, offers its users “rooms” that are essentially group audio chats. They can also be set as public addresses or panel discussions where some users are “speakers” and the rest are audience members. The platform has over 10 million users and is...

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Lily Hay Newman
16h ago
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Gig Workers Gather Their Own Data to Check the Algorithm’s Math

Gig Workers Gather Their Own Data to Check the Algorithm’s Math

been biking for UberEats for a few weeks last July when he accepted a delivery he estimated would take 20 minutes, tops. But the app led him up one of the steepest hills in Pittsburgh, a 4-mile one-way trip that clocked in at an hour. Then he noticed that had only paid him for 1 mile—the distance between his origin and destination as the crow flies, but not as the man bikes.“I’d only done 20 deliveries, and this already happened to me,” Samii says. “For people who do this full-time, are they going to look this deeply into this statement? Are they ever going to find this issue?”Samii is a...

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Aarian Marshall
3d ago
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The Terrible T-Mobile/Sprint Merger Must Be Undone

The Terrible T-Mobile/Sprint Merger Must Be Undone

Division was not particularly skilled at market design. In February 2020, it convinced a judge to wave through the , under the belief—a prayer really—that the merged firm could be forced to breathe life into a nascent rival, Dish, and that the rival would invest billions in its own network. This was like trading a first-round pick in the draft for an aging journeyman with an incurable knee injury.Never mind that this experiment of using a reseller as “fixer” for a wireless merger that reduced four competitors to three had stumbled , revealing the critical role of a fourth facilities-based...

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Hal Singer
2d ago
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The Brain’s ‘Background Noise’ May Be Meaningful After All

The Brain’s ‘Background Noise’ May Be Meaningful After All

research symposium in January 2020, Janna Lendner presented findings that hint at a way to look at people’s brain activity for signs of the boundary between wakefulness and unconsciousness. For patients who are comatose or under anesthesia, it can be all-important that physicians make that distinction correctly. Doing so is trickier than it might sound, however, because when someone is in the dreaming state of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, their brain produces the same familiar, smoothly oscillating brain waves as when they are awake. reprinted with permission from , an editorially...

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Elizabeth Landau
6d ago
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Gig Workers Gather Their Own Data to Check the Algorithm’s Math

Gig Workers Gather Their Own Data to Check the Algorithm’s Math

been biking for UberEats for a few weeks last July when he accepted a delivery he estimated would take 20 minutes, tops. But the app led him up one of the steepest hills in Pittsburgh, a 4-mile one-way trip that clocked in at an hour. Then he noticed that had only paid him for 1 mile—the distance between his origin and destination as the crow flies, but not as the man bikes.“I’d only done 20 deliveries, and this already happened to me,” Samii says. “For people who do this full-time, are they going to look this deeply into this statement? Are they ever going to find this issue?”Samii is a...

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Aarian Marshall
3d ago
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Great News, America: Cheese Isn’t Bad for You

Great News, America: Cheese Isn’t Bad for You

Cheese is among the ultimate guilty pleasures. It’s gooey. It’s fatty. It’s delicious. It just has to be bad for you, right? Wrong. A large body of research suggests that cheese’s reputation as a fattening, heart-imperiling food is undeserved. When it comes to weight and other key health outcomes (and setting aside the issue of lactose intolerance, with apologies), cheese is neutral at worst, and possibly even good for you. And yet that research doesn’t seem to have broken through into common knowledge. If you Google “cheese,” the top result under “people also ask” is the ungrammatical...

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Gilad Edelman
5d ago
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China Hijacked an NSA Hacking Tool in 2014—and Used It for Years | WIRED

China Hijacked an NSA Hacking Tool in 2014—and Used It for Years | WIRED

More than four years after a began wantonly onto the internet, the question that debacle raised—whether any intelligence agency can prevent its "zero-day" stockpile from —still haunts the security community. That wound has now been reopened, with evidence that Chinese hackers obtained and reused another NSA hacking tool years before the Shadow Brokers brought it to light.On Monday, the security firm Check Point revealed that it had discovered evidence that a Chinese group known as APT31, also known as Zirconium or Judgment Panda, had somehow gained access to and used a Windows-hacking tool...

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Andy Greenberg
5d ago
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Billionaires See VR as a Way to Avoid Radical Social Change

Billionaires See VR as a Way to Avoid Radical Social Change

virtual reality is far more than just video games. Silicon Valley sees the creation of virtual worlds as the ultimate free-market solution to a political problem. In a world of increasing wealth inequality, environmental disaster, and political instability, why not sell everyone a device that whisks them away to a virtual world free of pain and suffering? Tech billionaires aren’t shy about sharing this. “Some people read this the wrong way and react incorrectly to it. The promise of VR is to make the world you wanted. It is not possible, on Earth, to give everyone all that they would want....

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Matthew Gault
Feb 15
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Boston Dynamics’ Robot Dog Is Now Armed—in the Name of Art

Boston Dynamics’ Robot Dog Is Now Armed—in the Name of Art

has racked up hundreds of millions of YouTube views with viral clips of its futuristic, legged robots , , and .A group of meme-spinning pranksters now wants to present a more dystopian view of the company's robotic tech. They added a paintball gun to , the company’s doglike machine, and plan to let others control it inside a mocked-up art gallery via the internet later this week.The project, called , is the work of (pronounced “mischief,” of course), an internet collective that regularly carries out meme-worthy pranks.Previous MSCHF stunts include creating to whomever could hold a button...

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Will Knight
5d ago
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The AI Research Paper Was Real. The ‘Coauthor’ Wasn't

The AI Research Paper Was Real. The ‘Coauthor’ Wasn't

co-director of a prestigious lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was scanning an in December when he noticed something odd—his name listed as an author alongside three researchers in China whom he didn’t know on two papers he didn’t recognize.At first, he didn’t think much of it. The name Cox isn’t uncommon, so he figured there must be another David Cox doing AI research. “Then I opened up the PDF and saw my own picture looking back at me,” says. “It was unbelievable.”It isn’t clear how prevalent this kind of academic fraud may be, or why someone would list as a coauthor someone not involved...

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Will Knight
Feb 19
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Sites Have a Sneaky New Way to Track You Across the Web

Sites Have a Sneaky New Way to Track You Across the Web

the first known appearance of , in inevitable but still somewhat concerning development, especially given how little time it took the bad guys to adjust to the new ARM-based architecture. Fortunately, this week , which should help security researchers and companies protect against the latest and greatest macOS and iOS threats.International hacking made the news this week as well. France tied to a campaign that , a company based there. And the this week, alleging their involvement in a sweeping series of heists and scams that includes the and attempted thefts totally $1.3 billion.Elsewhere,...

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Brian Barrett
7d ago
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Malware Is Now Targeting Apple’s New M1 Processor

Malware Is Now Targeting Apple’s New M1 Processor

always been less common than its Windows-targeting counterparts, but in recent years the threat to Apple computers has gone mainstream. There's  and even tailored to Macs, and attackers are always looking to Apple's latest defenses. Now hackers have debuted malware tailored to run on Apple's new ARM-based M1 processors, released for the , , and in November.Apple's M1 chip is a departure from the Intel x86 architecture Apple has used since 2005, and it gives Apple the opportunity to bake specific Mac security protections and features directly into its processors. That transition has required...

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Lily Hay Newman
Feb 17
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A Trippy Visualization Charts the Internet's Growth Since 1997

A Trippy Visualization Charts the Internet's Growth Since 1997

security researcher Barrett Lyon was finishing college at California State University, Sacramento while working full time as a penetration tester—a hacker companies hire to find weaknesses in their own digital systems. At the beginning of each job, Lyon would do some basic reconnaissance of the customer's infrastructure; “case the joint,” as he puts it. He realized he was essentially refining and repeating a formula to map what the new target network looked like. “That formula ended up being an easy piece of software to write, so I just started having this software do all the work for me,”...

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Lily Hay Newman
6d ago
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Apple Offers Its Closest Look Yet at iOS and MacOS Security

Apple Offers Its Closest Look Yet at iOS and MacOS Security

notoriously tight-lipped and insular organization, a tendency that has often put it at odds with the security research community. The company is typically secretive on the technical details of how its products and security features work. So the resource that security researchers say they have come to rely on most for bread crumbs is Apple's annual Platform Security Guide, the new edition of which . It provides the most comprehensive and technical look at Apple's safeguards yet—including the first documentation of .Apple first offered the guide a decade ago as  a very short writeup at the...

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Lily Hay Newman
Feb 18
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Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light

Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light

of a University of Pennsylvania engineering building, Mohsen Azadi and his labmates huddled around a set of blinding LEDs set beneath an acrylic vacuum chamber. They stared at the lights, their cameras, and what they hoped would soon be some action from the two tiny plastic plates sitting inside the enclosure. “We didn't know what we were expecting to see,” says Azadi, a mechanical engineering PhD candidate. “But we hoped to see something.”Let’s put it this way: They wanted to see if those plates would levitate, lofted solely by the power of light. Light-induced flow, or photophoresis,...

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Max G. Levy
Feb 12
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Scientists Accidentally Discover Strange Creatures Under a Half Mile of Ice | WIRED

Scientists Accidentally Discover Strange Creatures Under a Half Mile of Ice | WIRED

Bivouacked in the middle of the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf—a five-hour flight from the nearest Antarctic station—nothing comes easy. Even though it was the southern summer, geologist James Smith of the British Antarctic Survey endured nearly three months of freezing temperatures, sleeping in a tent, and eating dehydrated food. The science itself was a hassle: To study the history of the floating shelf, he needed seafloor sediment, which was locked under a half mile of ice.To get to it, Smith and his colleagues had to melt 20 tons of snow to create 20,000 liters of hot water, which they then...

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Matt Simon
Feb 15
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The Grim Consequences of a Misleading Study on Disinformation

The Grim Consequences of a Misleading Study on Disinformation

esteemed Oxford Internet Institute announced a major report on disinformation and “cyber troops” with a describing an "industrial-scale problem." Worldwide press coverage echoed claims that OII had revealed the "increasing role" private firms play in spreading computational propaganda. Actual evidence presented in the annual “survey” of social media manipulation, however, is much thinner than the hype.While the report's website , "Cyber troop activity continues to increase around the world," inside the report, OII claim they show “publicly identified” cases of disinformation operations have...

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Emma Briant
Feb 18
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The LA Musician Who Designed a Microphone for Mars

The LA Musician Who Designed a Microphone for Mars

"seven minutes of terror." As the 2,300-pound, six-wheeled, nuclear-powered Perseverance rover approaches Mars on Thursday, a supersonic parachute will slow the descent vehicle to 200 mph. About 70 feet above the landing site, retrorockets will settle it into a hover, then a “sky crane” will lower NASA’s newest rock-crawler to the rust-colored dirt below. As Perseverance touches down, the descent ship will boost itself clear and crash-land nearby. Don’t worry, it’s going to be fine: Perseverance, which will explore martian geology and search for evidence of ancient microbial life there, is...

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Eric Adams
Feb 17
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Scientists Accidentally Discover Strange Creatures Under a Half Mile of Ice

Scientists Accidentally Discover Strange Creatures Under a Half Mile of Ice

middle of the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf—a five-hour flight from the nearest Antarctic station—nothing comes easy. Even though it was the southern summer, geologist James Smith of the British Antarctic Survey endured nearly three months of freezing temperatures, sleeping in a tent, and eating dehydrated food. The science itself was a hassle: To study the history of the floating shelf, he needed seafloor sediment, which was locked under a half mile of ice. To get to it, Smith and his colleagues had to melt 20 tons of snow to create 20,000 liters of hot water, which they then pumped through a...

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Matt Simon
Feb 15
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Don’t Tell Einstein, but Black Holes Might Have ‘Hair’

Don’t Tell Einstein, but Black Holes Might Have ‘Hair’

nothing on black holes. Twins may grow from the same genetic blueprints, but they can differ in a thousand ways—from temperament to hairstyle. Black holes, according to Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity, can have just three characteristics—mass, spin and charge. If those values are the same for any two black holes, it is impossible to discern one twin from the other. Black holes, they say, have no hair. “In classical general relativity, they would be exactly identical,” said Paul Chesler, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University. “You can’t tell the difference.” reprinted with...

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Jonathan O'Callaghan
Feb 14
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Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light | WIRED

Researchers Levitated a Small Tray Using Nothing but Light | WIRED

In the basement of a University of Pennsylvania engineering building, Mohsen Azadi and his labmates huddled around a set of blinding LEDs set beneath an acrylic vacuum chamber. They stared at the lights, their cameras, and what they hoped would soon be some action from the two tiny plastic plates sitting inside the enclosure. “We didn't know what we were expecting to see,” says Azadi, a mechanical engineering PhD candidate. “But we hoped to see something.”Let’s put it this way: They wanted to see if those plates would levitate, lofted solely by the power of light. Light-induced flow, or...

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Max G. Levy
Feb 12
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NASA Wants to Set a New Radiation Limit for Astronauts

NASA Wants to Set a New Radiation Limit for Astronauts

Biden administration has for NASA’s Artemis mission to the moon, maybe we should think about the risks astronauts will face when they get there, and what might happen during a longer trip to Mars.Of all the things to worry about while traveling in space—equipment malfunctions, the , , and —one the most difficult to deal with is the health effects of radiation from the sun or cosmic events. This radiation consists of atoms that have lost their electrons as they accelerate in interstellar space, approaching the speed of light—something that happens right after a star explodes, for example. It...

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Eric Niiler
Feb 11
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The Unreal, Eerie Emptiness of China's 'Ghost Cities'

The Unreal, Eerie Emptiness of China's 'Ghost Cities'

of Ordos, China is a marvel of urban planning, 137-square miles of shining towers, futuristic architecture and pristine parks carved out of the grassland of Inner Mongolia. It is a thoroughly modern city, but for one thing: No one lives there. Well, almost nobody. Kangbashi is one of hundreds of sparkling new cities sitting relatively empty throughout China, built by a government eager to urbanize the country but shunned by people unable to afford it or hesitant to leave the rural communities they know. Chicago photographer visited Kangbashi and two other cities for his ongoing series . The...

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Laura Mallonee
Feb 4
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As Robots Fill the Workplace, They Must Learn to Get Along

As Robots Fill the Workplace, They Must Learn to Get Along

work at Changi General Hospital in Singapore that until recently it wasn’t uncommon to find two delivery bots sitting in a hallway or outside an elevator in a standoff. Such impasses used to happen “several times a day,” says Selina Seah, who directs the hospital’s . Unsure how to move around another object, or human passersby, the would simply freeze, each waiting for the other to move first. “The humans would have to actually go down and pull them apart,” she says.Seah says Changi has about 50 robots, from eight manufacturers. As at other hospitals, robotic systems assist professionals...

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Will Knight
Feb 2
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Finally, an Interesting Proposal for Section 230 Reform

Finally, an Interesting Proposal for Section 230 Reform

of last year, there were few better symbols of bad-faith politics than Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the law that gives online platforms legal immunity for user-generated content. After a fairly sleepy existence since its passage in 1996, Section 230 turned into an unlikely for a subset of Republican politicians who disingenuously blamed it for letting social media platforms discriminate against conservatives. (In fact, the law has nothing to do with partisan balance, and if anything allows platforms to keep more right-wing content up than they otherwise would.) Down the...

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Gilad Edelman
Feb 5
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